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Full text of "Microcosm"

'49 




SIMMONS COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 



Digitized by tine Internet Arcliive 

in 2012 witli funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://arGhive.org/details/microGOsm1949simm 



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MHT .no The ?enway, Boston, 



Massachusetts 



(Microcosm 



1949 



40* 

Y 



(3/InniversaR 



SIMMONS 




BOSTON 



MASSACHUSBTTS 




t;ihyiMnw<v rr\t i tree 1 uioufsw 



f 




th 



NTS 



► ADMINISTRATION : f'^ :„f; ":%:'r, 



►SCHOOLS 



We go to class at 
times - - Page 30 



► ACTIVITIES: 



Our life begins at 
4:10 - - - Page 50 



^f^T AQQThQ- fo*^!" '^ears with a 



50 Years of Training Young Women 




John Simmons, Founder. 



1902, this idea of John Simmons was actu- 
alized. 

Dr. Henry Lefavour, the first president 
of Simmons College, thanked the students 
that October morning for the courage they 
exhibited in registering in this new, un- 
proven college, for their confidence in the 
School and, implicitly, in themselves. For, 
as the second president of the College, Dr. 
Bancroft Beatley, has said, the final judg- 
ment of an educational institution is deter- 
mined by the characters of its graduates. 
Dr. Lefavour continued that every educa- 
tional undertaking expresses in good meas- 
ure "the ideals of the place from which it 
springs." 

In terms of this statement the source of 



It was the will of John Simmons that 
there should be a school in Boston in 
which young women would be educated 
in those arts, sciences, and industries 
which would prepare them for an eco- 
nomically independent life. On October 9, 




^f -1 -I -1 T 1_t " 





Henry Lefavour, First President. 



to "Gain an Independent Livelihood. 



f) 




Sarah Louise Arnold, First Dean. 



Simmons College is twofold, and there is 
double-dutied responsibility charged to 
every young woman graduated from Sim- 
mons College. John Simmons worked 
within an area of industry that he per- 
sonally revolutionized, and his contacts 
in this industry brought him into touch 
with many women left destitute, without 
skill or training, after the Civil War, and 
with that economic class of women, seam- 
stresses, who made his own economic 
position possible. 

He was not one of the "solid men" of 
literary Boston, and he had no accurate 
conception of academic curricula. But he 
had "extended his business to meet the 



new order of things", and now he made 
education a part of his business. In his will 
he commanded that part of his estate be 
invested in the training of young women 
for "an independent livelihood." The in- 
dustry of John Simmons, then, is one 
source of our College. 

Dr. Lefavour is the second source, or an 
indication of the source. He recognized 
the inadequacy of duplication, and in his 
recommendations to the Corporation in 
1901 he outlined a completely new com- 
bination of course units that based voca- 



Tech's Walker, where Simmons first held classes. 




After looking back on 50 years 




Miss Jatie Louise Mesick, Second Dean of Simmons. 
Bancroft Beatly, when he became Second President. 




tional training on "the best in the tradi- 
tion of liberal arts". 

He led the way with standards of the 
future without alienating those of the 
past. He is representative of the courage, 
wisdom, and foresight of the early fac 
students, and the first dean, Miss 
Louise Arnold, who were the builde^uf 
the very firm foundation of Simmons 
lege on what was then not very 
ground — anticipation of the changi 
the changing world. 

It is to the world of which Boston^ 
microcosm that we owe our twofol 
sponsibility, the world of liberal ar 

industries. Durins this first half'-di 

oil 

over twelve thousand young womeS^havl; 

Simmons College today and the area 






. . . We look ahead. 



been graduated from Simmons College 
into this world, and that they were trained 
to meet the needs of the changing world is 
accurate proof of the successful mainte- 
of a program that combines cultural 
ocational education. 
fl^flsljitffiflie ideals of Boston and of New Eng- 
igl^^g IKHflj the place from which in essence the 
lege has sprung, are thrift, industry, 
.-fjfSf helpfulness. These are the qualities 
cii John Simmons possessed. These are 
Inequalities which Dr. Lefavour recom- 
SSfed to his first class in 1902. And these 
he qualities which have sustained the 
M^: of an independent livelihood in fact 
pirit. 
fifty years, through two wars, 

■that will he used for new buildings. 






Evans Hall, typical of the new cai/ipus of the future. 



Today we are acquainting ourselves with 



through a depression, and through periods 
of swiftest change, Simmons has adapted 
and developed its capacities, and planned 
always for the future. For twenty-five 
years Miss Jane Louise Mesick has served 
as Dean, and for sixteen years Dr. Bancroft 
Beatley has served as President. During 
their administrations the early faculty has 
been completely replaced, the School of 
English has been established, the School 
of Social Work has been made a graduate 
school and the School of Preprofessional 
Studies instituted to take its place on an 
undergraduate level and to provide a 
wider scope of preprofessional studies. 
Placement service has been centralized, 
standards of admission and guidance have 
been revised and developed, the library 
facilities have been expanded and the 
library contains over 100,000 volumes. 

From the original four schools and 125 
students, the College has grown to include 



At Olde English Dinner seniors and faculty join in 
Christmas festivities . 

At Stu-G open meetings we air our opinions and listen to 
others. 





10 



our college, our classmates^ and our world. 





Student-faculty teas are one of the many ways we meet our 
instructors . 

NSA has -proved a growing influence both among students 

on the Simmons campus and our relation to students in 

the country and the world. 



nine schools and over 1600 registered stu- 
dents from almost every state in the coun- 
try and more than fourteen foreign coun- 
tries. Extensive plans have been made to 
enlarge the outgrown buildings, to build 
a new library, a new science building, a 
social and health unit, new residence 
halls and refectory. These are some of the 
plans for the future, for the second half- 
century for which the work of John Sim- 
mons, Dr. Lefavour, President Beatley, 
Miss Arnold, Dean Mesick, of all the 
faculty and students, will bear more and 
richer fruit. 




11 




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tJMicm:osrrL^ 



For the past forty years Microcosm has been the official yearbook of Si 
lege. During that time it has reflected the changes and developments in t 




ns Col- 
College, 



its students, its curricula, and its relation to the outside world. Its jc ry name 
was chosen at that time to express this relationship of the Simmo 
to the world about her. "A little world within a world" had been 
behind the series of yearbooks and the College and activities that 
This year the fortieth volume in that series endeavors to show 
and changes that have ensued during this period of Simmons 
many instances we find accounts of the same schools and eve 
read of in the first yearbook. In many other, though, th 
changes and additions that were required by changes in 
the college. And in some cases we have even looked to 
of Simmons. But throughout the whole history of S 



we find the same interest and ideal to train, te, 
Simmons girl to meet the problems and needs o 
of which she is a part. In this anniversary ed 
we have attempted to show this whole n 
forty years of a yearbook and forty-seven years 
We have told of the history of its foundi 
growth, the awareness of its changes 
future. And above all, the correlatio 
cosM and the outside world. 





I iiri) will k; (|..' s.iKi 

iialK waul. Twcii- 

il, ilic somcthinn 

I ; lir Siminons 

niiiif^ ihcif 

liif l:il>oi'a- 

i^ciloi-s, as 

and ill 



vvi-- 1 ' 




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^Bmtt^'' " -ff' liomc-work, 
** ,.jis lia\'f helped with 

I >\iirk. blood-tldii.iting, firsl- 
spnttiiig, lali fesearcli, social 
)ii can Ccdi il work — hostessing 

unions is still Tech, liut only 
tint;; in only one \-oie behinc 
weekends, no doubt; y 
1 ( )\roid, C'o)>' 
id oih' 



les may 

•nbers,' 

)thin(r 

as a 

• lo 
ek- 

(T 



tiiinici' 

'Moiiieiii oj Darkness, directed by Jan Blanchaixl and 
lUizabcth Bfimley. I'he Sopliomores gave Aaeiil mi 
Rereii<;i', directed by Thehna Santoro, and the 
Freshmen, .glplj^ii^jiiiiiljllimjiii^niiiii',., ted 
l;:d>the Da| 

The Cbj^^mmainr/Kimiem^^^m^m lovcuesi 



There are now thirty-seven Acaden 
and tlie club has great expectations 
classmen will soon swell the ranks. 



Olli 



cers 



foT the \car were: 



pe 
Idi 

,)o 
R 

'ov 



lif 
.anc 

' as a 






id Mis 

■ Nati\ - 



the big 

iiieni, di- 

".ngland 

resciita- 

ham as 

gwall as 

illcy as 

nd Don- 

ergwal' 




:h featured a skit, 

: OPEN DOOR pc)lic;y 
. from all divisi 



ot .'Mmmor 
under the 
Margarci 
it) with M 

Spring 
eature o 
cted b\ 
.servatc 
The J 
ora, 
^, Je= 
atrl 
ids! 
CI 
by 
b oHicers for 1946-47 were: President, 
he Ehlers; Vice-President, Mary Chapin: 
easurcr, Thelma Sanf 
anchard; Tea Chairman/ 

ANDLELICiliT IN THE 

Tiust he coming!" Uppe, 
the Dean at dinner man 
of the year, and the presf/ 
on the table is the sure/ 
Mesick is in the vicini? 
Though the light is 
Dean rc>- "' see the' 
dart .' 

nods with a friendly twinkle. At 

> those same eyes are never still — 

"l as she speaks, and they shine 

"tains with tales of her myriad 

hes" she has manoeuvred; 

her car; committees and 

on; her trips back to her 



l.anib; Secretary, lalliati 
SharcofF; Junior Represe^ 
Senior Represenlali\'e, ]> 

vital, and represct 
1 )orm Board chc 
ofdormitor)- i 
effective jud- 

Honor ^l^iX .^^.^>v ^ l>o 

develo "% -^ \ >J| evei 

stud -^-^^^1^^ ■ 1^ ffi she 

transfi 
The Faculi 
out its princ 
to reach the f'resl 
^^C)pportunitics, and a s\stem 1 
^i... u.ncs instituted to l)c signed by each student ; 
'^f" vcar. 'I'his way, and by meat 
Hnnor Board rounde 
#" )| ' "onscious of tl 




^**^^ % 







nos 
/ch 
je g 

sele 



J'he blue ■•,. 

few Jiiniors and Seii.. 

ighten an acadei... 
't is a member of Simmi 
1 — Academy. 

in 1 91 9, Academy was originally n 

iety, but a grotip which aimed at pr 

nderstanciing of the arts. Membersh 

roficiencv in tl 



r^i^ Acadcn 



-me Dra 
T^conomics Clul 



have this extra oppoi-- 
" Dean, commuters lic- 
-o rt'ell — at conferences, and 
...iiig line of the many formals given 
taring the college year. 

Raconteur, match-maker, counselor, friend. 
Ihis is Jane Louise Mesick, Dean of Simmons. 




olely on 
al subj 
recog: 
ege 
ud 
and non-piT)fessi( 

Toda\-, in\w 
a better than 
at least a tv\^ 
honfirs. She r 
well as the 
New me 
formal rece 
Hall. Tl 
Belgian 
spoke o 
cation, 
chatted w 

Academy sponsr 
\ear's Clirisimas 




ometime in her four years at Simmons the average student becomes 
aware of the awe-inspiring term "administration." It may be at the time 
during orientation week of her freshman year when the President or 
the Dean address the incoming class — or it might be when the President of 
Student Government or the Chairman of Honor Board explains the system 
of self-government by the student at Simmons or the responsibility of the 
Honor System. But through her four years at College each student 
is reminded of the guiding hand in back of her. A conference with the Dean 
or with the Guidance Director, a talk with the Placement Director in 
her senior year before she leaves Simmons to go on to work. 
All these help to tie the Simmons girl in closer relationship with the ad- 
ministration of the College. The Stu-G open meetings let her 
know what is going on in the Council and what plans are being made that 
will affect her and future students. Even after she is graduated, 
the Alumnae Office and the Kevieiv keep her in touch with the College 
and her classmates. In her four years at College each student 
comes to realize the warm, human, and lasting friendship that is Simmons. 




The front of the building ivas still the same when students 
and faculty tvalked in to class in the morning many years 



'.'■®S3> 



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[y 



/i 



tf-- 






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A 



'Ht*'*^- "tff*^ 



^ 



y*- 



'ihe Atadm 



Ever ready to counsel and guide us, 




Dean Mesick, retirhig in June, 1949, the very best friend 
we have at Simmons. 



From the students' point of 
view the administration of the 
business of Simmons College is a 
formidable job done with admi- 
rable suavity, and this over-all 
impression is created only because 
of the individuals who are the 
Officers of Administration. 

We must say good-by this June 
to Dean Jane Louise Mesick, who 
has announced her retirement 
after twenty-five years in office. 
Officially Miss Mesick is Dean, 
but unofficially to every girl with 
trouble or triumph she is friend 
and counselor. Miss Mesick's ab- 
sence will be keenly felt. 

Before President Bancroft Beat- 
ley came to Simmons in 1932 he 
was associate professor of educa- 
tion in the Graduate School of 
Education of Harvard University. 
This superior academic background 
combined with his understanding, 
as a parent and a teacher, of stu- 
dent life makes President Beatley's 



Mr. Batchelder watches one set of books i 



• librarians another. 




16 



we find and welcome friends as freshmen . . . 




Miss Clapp and Miss Hanson make sure we put our training to u'ork. 



major task of coordinating the 
academic, administrative, and so- 
cial aspects of the College a second- 
ary one from the students' view- 
point. We know President Beatley 
not as the executive force on the 
second floor, but as the one to go 
to for advice and active help in 
student projects, and for under- 
standing and solutions of student 
problems. 

President Beatley is assisted in 
the great job of coordinator and 
executor of Corporation and Col- 
lege policies by Vice-President 
J. Garton Needham. Dr. Needham 
is in close touch with students 
through his position as professor 
of psychology. 

Dr. George Nye Steiger, as 
Dean of the Graduate Division, 
follows the progress of many stu- 
■ dents through their four under- 
graduate years and beyond, to 
their study in the library, social 



President Beatley, as enthusiastic about Simmons girls as 
he is about trains. 



work, nursing, and other fields in 
which graduate work is provided. 
Guidance during these four 
years and policies of admission 
are very capably administered by 
Miss Doris M. Sutherland, and 
with the approach of graduation 



17 



The administration who have a watchful 




Miss Anna M. Hanson attends 
to the perennial questions of jobs, 
qualifications, and wages, as Di- 
rector of Placement. 

Financially, Mr. Richmond K. 
Bachelder is at the helm, and his 
staff complies with student de- 
mands, from making change for 
candy bars to auditing club treas- 
urers' accounts. 

Dr. Marjorie E. Readdy is our 
doctor whose patience matches 
her patients and whose sincere at- 
tention to each individual prob- 
lem makes a visit to her office a 
pleasure. 

Registration each year has been 
Mrs. Margaret K. Gonyea's big- 



Miss Sutherland who hitervieit's us before ice enter Sim- 
mons and helps shape our studies through jour years. 



M.iss Wry to guide; Mrs. Gorsk, and Dr. Keaddy to check; the Registrar's 

Office to keep check. 





18 



eye and a very sympathetic ear. 




gest headache, but we've never 
seen her with a bottle of aspirin, 
or without her famous smile. 
Then when registration is over 
and done for the last time we're 
alumnae, and Miss Helen L. Dea- 
con keeps us in touch with each 
other. 

Before or after graduation Miss 
Marie LaPorte, with those lovely 
flowers on her desk, takes care of 
our questions and our phone calls; 
and Miss Frances J. Weaver, with 
more lovely flowers in the lunch- 
room, takes care of our perpetual 
appetites. 

If we want publicity, and who's 
ever refused it, Miss Pauline A. 
Sidman is the woman to see, in her 
Office of Public Relations. And if 



Always an ansiver from AI. LaPorte, help and aid jrom lArs. Chapman 
and Miss Heivitt. 



we need books we have two very 
pleasant choices, Mrs. Helen M. 
Bradstreet's Book Store, or the 
libraries, whose staff, directed by 
Kenneth R. Shaffer and Miss Mar- 
garet J. Arnold, will find any book 
you ask for, whether it's right 
under your nose or among the 
overflow in the New England 
Deposit Library. 

Over on campus Miss Ruth H. 
Danielson and Mrs. Frank Cooper 
complete the administrative pic- 
ture as directors of residence who 
smooth the emotional and social 
rough spots of dorm life. 



U. S. Company Formed 
To Finish Panama Canal 

The Female Tech Opens 



19 



Faculty and Staff: Together they spell 




Joe Fink — St. Nicholas for the day. 



Lunchroom Line-up . 




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20 



JULES VERNE • EDVARD GRIEG • JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER 



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Miss Granara, our favorite woman instructor. 




Cafeteria Causerie. 








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help, aid and entertainment . . . 




The first adjective that pops into a Simmons 
girl's mind when you mention her faculty to her is 
"friendly," for in her four years at Simmons she 
has found that no matter what the course, what the 
assignment, or what the problem, she can always 
count on her instructor for advice and cooperation. 
Whether it is in the conference rooms or in a private 
office the men and women of the faculty are Sally's 
best friends during her four years. 

From her first introduction to the members of 
the faculty at the freshman reception to the last 
good-by after graduation, she has probably seen 
as much of the faculty outside the classroom as 
in it. Student-faculty teas offer one type of social 
get-together and back-step talks over a cigarette 
another. The annual softball game between the girls 
and the faculty show up their athletic prowess 
and it's not unusual for some wiry freshman to out- 
play one of her instructors in the ping-pong tourna- 
ment held each spring. 

And where would her date see her favorite profs 
if not at a Simmons dance as they bow in the receiv- 
ing line. Even as all Sallies know "music hath 
charm" when heard at Pops with her soc. 10 in- 
structor and classmates. 



Otir Favorite Prof — Mr. Sypher — We knew he was 
' but did he have to use three handsl 



Joe Pink — everybody s helper. 





Which one has the puppet^ 



21 



JOSEPH JEFFERSON • HENRIK IBSEN • SAMUEL L CLEMENS 




Mrs. Berger advises. 



ABBOTT, DIANA BALLIN, S.B,, A.M., M.P.H. 
(Mrs. John A, Abbott") 
Special Instructor in Nutrition 
ABBOTT, MARGIA HAUGH, Ph.B. 
(Mrs. Arthur H. Abbott) 
Associate Professor of Textiles 
ACKERMAN, ISABELLE FLORINA MAY 

Special Lecturer on Public Health Nutrition 
ADAMS, HELEN GOLLER, S,B., A.M. 
(Mrs. Frank W. Adams) 
Associate Professor of Secretarial Studies 
ALLAN, EUNICE FLANAGAN, A.B., M.S.S. 
(Mrs. Malcolm S. Allan) 
Special Instructor in Psychiatric Social Work 
AMES, LOUISE BATES, Ph.D. 
(Mrs. Louise B. Ames) 
Special Lecturer on Medical Information 
ANDERSON, MARGARET INA, R,N., S.B. 

Special Instructor in Industrial Nursing 
ANGYAL, ALICE FELLNER, Ph.D. 
(Mrs. Andris Angyal) 
Special Instructor in Psychology 
ANTHONY, ELIZABETH STEVENS, A.M. 

Instructor in Biology 
BACHELDER, RICHMOND KNOWLTON, B.B.A. 
Treasurer and Comptroller 

AILEY, MARGARET BURTON, A.M., S.M. 
Associate Professor of Social Economy 
BANDLER, LOUISE SILBERT, A.B., M.S.S. 
(Mrs. Betnard Bandler) 
Lecturer on Psychiatric Social Work 
BARRY, ELIZABETH EVANS. S.B,, B.N., R.N. 

Special Lecturer on Rheumatic Fever 
BARTLETT, HARRIETT MOULTON, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Social Economy 
BEAN. H. CLIFFORD. A.B. 

Special Lecturer on Labor Relations 
BECKLEY. DONALD K., A.B., S.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Retailing and 
Director of Prince School of Retailing 
BENJAMIN, EVELYN MAY. A.B., S.M. 

Instructor in Home Management and Child Development 
BERGER, KATHLEEN, SB., EdM. 
(Mrs. Walter M. Berger) 
Assistant Professor of Secretarial Studies 
BIBRING. CRETE LEHNER, M.D. 
(Mrs. Edward Bibring) 
Special Lecturer on Analytic Psychology 
BICKFORD, ELAINE MILDRED. S.M. 

Instructor in Chemistry 
BLAKESLEE, DAVID WHITNEY. S.M. 

Assistant Professor of Retailing 
BLISS, ALLEN DOUGLASS, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
BOOTH, PAULINE PRANCES 

Assistant in the Office, School of Home Economics 
BOSWORTH, RAYMOND FRANCIS, S.B.. A,M. 
Professor English, and Director of the School of English 
BRATTON. VIRGINIA LOUISE, S.B. 

Assistant in Publishing 
BRONNER, AUGUSTA FOX, S.B., Ph.D. 
(Mrs. William Healy) 
Special Lecturer on Mental Hygiene 
BROTHERTON, NINA CAROLINE, A.M. 
Professor of Library Science 



BUSH, LYLE KENNETH, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Art 
BYERS, EDWARD ELMER, SB., Ed.M. 

Assistant Professor of Secretarial Studies 
CAMERON, SALLY ANN. A.B. 

Assistant in the Libraries of the School of Social Work' and the 

Prince School of Retailing 
CASO. ELIZABETH KINGSBURY, S.M. 

(Mrs. Pasquale A. Caso) 

Special Lecturer on Public Health Nutrition 
CHAMBERS, IRENE McALLISTER, Ph.B., A.M., S.B. 

Associate Professor of Retailing 
CHANNING, ALICE, A.B., S.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Social Economy 
CLAPP, RUTH, B.S. in Ed-. A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Child Detelopment, and Director of the 

Nursery School 
COGLAND. SHIRLEY MERRILL, A.B. 

Special Instructor in Physical Therapy 
COLVIN. LAURA CATHERINE. A.B.. A.M.L.S. 

Associate Professor of Library Science 
COOK. MARVIN WILMOTH. A.B., S.T.B. 

Special Instructor in Philosophy 
COOMBS, MILDRED LALIDER, A.B,. S.M. 

(Mrs. Mildred L, Coombs) 

Instructor in Bioloe,y 
COULTER. ISABELLA KELLOCK, SB., A.M. 

(Mrs. Jeremy A. Coulter) 

Associate Professor of Advertising 
DAVIDSON, MARY JOHNSTON, SB. 

Director of Residence, Executive Dietitian, and Lecturer on 

Institutional Management 
DERRY, MARGUERITE BOND, S.B. 

(Mrs. C. Malcolm Derry) 

Lecturer on Biolog y 
DEUTSCH, FELIX, M.D. 

Special Lecturer on Social Psychiatry 
DICKINSON, TILLY SVENSON, S.B., Ed.M. 

(Mrs. H. Donald Dickinson) 

Associate Professor of Secretarial Studies 
DODGE. QUINDARA OLIVER, S.M. 

(Mrs. Chester C. Dodge) 

Associate Professor of Institutional Management 
DOERR. CATHERINE MARY, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Clothinz, and Design 
DUNPHY, EDWIN BLAKESLEE, M.D. 

Lecturer on Orthoptics and Ophthalmology, and Medical Di- 
rector of the Program in Orthoptics 
DWYER. MARY LELLA. B.S. in Ed. 

Special Instructor in Physical Therapy 
EDGE. SIGRID ANDERSON, A.B., S.M. 

Professor of Library Science 
EDGELL. DAVID PALMER, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Enr^lish 
ENGLER. VIOLA GR.\CE, S.B., M.B.A. 

Associate Professor of Accounting 
FARBER. SIDNEY, SB., M.D. 

Lecturer on Patholog y 

FAVOUR, CUTTING B., A.B., M.D. 

Lecturer on Medicine 
FESSENDEN, DONALD LeSURE. A.B. 

Lecturer on Journalism 
FINESINGER, JACOB ELLIS, A.M.. M.D. 
Special Lecturer on Social Psychiatry 



Not just a list of 



FISHER, LUCY ELLIS, S.M. 

Assistant Professor of Foods 
FLEMING. FRANCES GEORGE-ANN, B.A.. SB. 

Assistant in Library Science 
FOREMAN, KATHLEEN FRANCES, B.A. 

Lecturer on Orthoptics, and Technical Director of the Program 

in Orthoptics 
FRECHETTE. ALFRED LEO, M.D., M.P.H. 

Lectureron Public Health 
GOLDMANN, FRANZ, M.D. 

Lectureron Public Health 
GRANARA, INA MARY. SB., A.M. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
GREEN, WILLIAM THOMAS, A.M., M.D. 

Lecturer on Orthopedic Surgery, and Medical Co-Director of the 

Program in Physical Therapy 
GREENBLATT, MILTON, A.B., M.D. 

Special Instructor in Psychiatry 
GREENE. ANNE MacLEOD,' B.S. in Phys. Ed. 

(Mrs. ArthurL. Greene) 

Special Instructor in The Dance 
GREENE, KENNETH MYRON, A.M. 

Instructor in English 
GRICE, DAVID STEPHEN. A.B.. M.D. 

Lecturer on Anatomy and Orthopedic Surs^ery 
GRINDELL. PRISCILLA LEACH. S.B.' 

Assistant to the Director, Prince School of Retailing 
GROSSMAN, WALTER, A.M. 

Instructor in History 
HANNA, JOHN GREIST. S.B., A.M. 

Assistant Professor of English 
HARASZTI, ZOLTAN, j.S.D., A.M. 

Lecturer on the History of the Book 
HARDWICK, KATHARINE DAVIS, A.B. 

Professor of Social Economy, and Directory of the School of 

Social Work 
HARLEY. HARRISON LeROY, S.B., Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophy and Psychology, Director of the School 

of Preprofessional Studies, and Chairman of the Division oj 

Philosophy, Psychology, and Education 
HART, ELIZABETH LOUISA, S.B., R.N. 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
HELMAN, EDITH FISHTINE, Ph.D. 

(Mrs. Bernard Helman) 

Professor of Spanish 
HEMENWAY, HARRIET SOUTHGATE. Ph.D. 

(Mrs. Leiand D, Hemenway) 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
HEMENWAY, LELAND DAVID, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
HIBBETT, TOMI KUWAYAMA, S.B., A.M. 

(Mrs. Howards. Hibhett, Jr.) 

Special Lectureron Public Health Nutrition 
HILLIARD, CURTIS MORRISON, A.B. 

Professor of Biolog y and Public Health 
HINTON, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS, S.B., M.D. 

Lecturer on Wassermann Technique 
HORD, NELLIE MARIA, S.B., A.M. 

Associate Professor of Foods and Nutrition 
HOSKINS. ROY GRAHAM, Ph.D., M.D. 

Special Lecturer on Social Psychiatry 
HOWE, RUTH WHITE, S.B. 

(Mrs. Percy R. Howe) 

Special Instructor in Nutrition 
HURD, YORICK GORDON, II, S.M. 

Instructor in Physics 
HURLBURT, LYDIA DELPHA, A.M. 

Special Instructor in Ent^lisb 
IFFT. JOHN DEMPSTER. Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Biolog y 
ISHIMOTO, CAROL FUMIYE. S.B. 

Assistant in Library Science 
ENKINSON, VERA LOUISE, S.B. 

Assistant to the Director, School of Social Work 
JOHNSON, HARRY MORTON, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Sociolog y 
JOHNSON. MARY PARKER, S.B. 

(Mrs. Beniamin T. Johnson) 

Special Instructor in Biology 
JOHNSON, ROGER, S.B.. M.B.A. 

Special Instructor in Statistics 
JONES, CHENEY CHURCH, A.B., LL.B., LL.D. 

Special Lectureron Child Welfare 
JONES, HELEN MARGARET, A.B., Ed.M. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
JOSKO, WILLIAM JOHN, S.B., Ed.M. 

Assistant Professor of Retailing 
KAHL, WILLIAM FREDERICK, A.M. 

Instructor in History 
KANN, PAUL JAMES. A.M. 

Assistant Professor of French 
KELLEY. MINNIE EMMETT, S.B. 

Lectureron Child Welfare 



22 



names, hut a list of friends. 



KINNEY, MARY RAMON. A.B., B.S. in L.S., S.M. 

Associate Professor of Library Science 
KLEIN, MANFRED, A.M. 

Associate Professor of German 
KRIDL, ELIZABETH CAMPBELL, S.B. 

(Mrs. Andrew G, Kridl) 

Assisiatit in Chcmtstry 
KRULEE, GILBERT KOREB. S.B.. Ed.M. 

Special Instructor in Group Work 
LAKE. ELVA MARION, Ph.B. 

Assistant to she Director, School of Nursing 
LaPORTE. MARIE C. 

Assistant in the Office of Iiiforinatioii 
LeBLANC, MARY THERESE, SB. 

Assistant in the Office, School of Business 
LEONARD, RUTH SHAW. S.M, 

Associate Professor of Library Science 
LEWIS. GERDA JOHANNA, A.B. 

Instructor in French and German 
LINDEMANN, ERICH, Ph.D., M.D. 

Special Lecturer on Social Psychiatry 
McCARROLL. LYNDON MARGARET, R.N. ,S.B., Ed.M. 

Professor of Nursim^, and Director of (he School of Nursing 
McCOMBS, ROBERT PRATT, S.B., M.D. 

Lecturer on Medical Information 
MacKAY, ELLEN HUGHES 

Assistant in the Office, School of Preprofessional Studies and 

Department of Biolog \ 
MacRAE, IRIS RUGGLES, A.B., S.M. 

(Mrs. Charles M. MacRae) 

Assistant in Social Work 
MAGUIRE, ELINOR WHELAN, S.M. 

(Mrs. FrancisJ. Maguire) 

Special Instructor in Home Economics Education 
MATLACK, JUDITH, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Em,ltsh 
MATTHEWS, PATRICIA MILNOR, A.B. 

(Mrs. H. Burtis Matthews) 

Assistant in the Office, School of Social Work 
MERRIL, JANET BOYD 

Lecturer on Physical Therapy, and Technical Director of the 

Program in Physical Therapy 
MERRITT, THOMAS PARKER, A.B., S.M. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
MILLER, EDWIN HAVILAND. A.M. 

Instructor in English 
MILLIKEN, MARGARET BONNEY, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of English 
MODIGLIANAI, ANNA MARIA, A.M. 

Instructor in Spanish 
MONTAGUE, OUIDA GROUSE, S.B. 

(Mrs. Ouida C. Monatague) 

Special Instructor in Hospital Laboratory Methods 
MORANG, KENNETH ELLSWORTH 

Special Instructor in Layout and Design 
MORRIS, EVANGELINE HALL, B.A., B.N., R.N. 

(Mrs. Cecil R. Morris) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
MOSELEY, ALFRED LOWELL, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
MURRAY, GRACE TOMLINSON, B.S. in Phys. Ed. 

(Mrs. David B. Murray) 

instructor in Physical Education 
NEAL, RAYMOND ELWOOD, S.B. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
NEEDHAM, JOSEPH GARTON, Ph.D. 

Vice-President and Professor of Psychology 
NESBITT, MARY EWING, B.S. in Ed. 

Special Instructor in Physical Therapy 
NICHOLS, MALCOLM STRONG, A.B. 

Special Lecturer on Family Welfare 
NICHOLS, PAUL RAYMOND, S.B,, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Economics 
NICOLL. DOROTHEA ELIZABETH, B.S. in Ed. 

Special Lecturer on Public Health Nutrition 
NITCHIE, GEORGE WILSON, A.M. 

Instructor in English 
NORTHRUP, SHIRLEY TUCK, A.M. 

(Mrs. Norman E, Northtup) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
NORTON, HELEN RICH, a'B. 

Professor of Retailing, Emerita 
O'BRIEN, HELENA VERONICA, SB., LL.B. 

Special Instructor in Business Law 
O'CONNOR, ELEANOR MANNING, S.B. 

(Mrs. Johnson O'Connor) 

Special Instructor in Housing 
PALMER, WALDO EMERSON, A.B, 

Professor of History 

PAVENSTEDT, ELEANOR, M.D. 
Special Instructor in Social Psychiatry 



PERSONS, MARIE ELLITHORPE 

(Mrs. Millard F. Persons) 

Resident Head, Francis Street Houses 
POOR, PATRICIA CRUMLEY. S.B., A.M. 

(Mrs. John L- Poor) 

Instructor in Bioloe, y 
PRATT, LALIA CHARLTON. S.B. 

(Mrs. Lawrence H. Pratt) 

Special Instructor in Chemistry 
PRENTiS. MARENDA ELLIOTT, A.M., S.B. 

Special Instructor in Socioloe, y 
QUARRINGTON. EDWARD FRANK. A.B, 

Special Instructor m Journalism 
RADCLIFFE, IRMASENKOVITS, A.B-, S.M. 

(Mrs. RobertJ, Radcliffe) 

Instructor in Bioloe, y 
RANKIN. ROBERT CARTER, LittB., Ph D. 

Associate Professor of History 
RICHARDSON PHILIP MORRISON, SB.. PhD, 

Professor of Biolog y 
ROBB, ELDA, SB., PhD., D.Sc. 

Professor of Nutrition, and Director of the School of Home 

Economics 
ROBERTS. HELEN LUCILE, A.B., M.D., M.P.H, 

(Mrs.John W. Strieder) 

Lecturer on Biolog y 
RODES, JOHN EDWARD, A.M. 

Special Instructor in German 
RODWELL, DOROTHY, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Biolog, y 
ROSENBERG, PEARL POLLACK, A.M. 

(Mrs. Murray D. Rosenberg) 

Special Instructor in Psychohg y 
ROWE, MARGARET.Ed-M' 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 
SALSGIVER. PAUL LOUGHRY, B.S. in Ed,, A.M. 

Professor of Business Economics, and Director of the School of 

Business 
SARGENT, FLORENCE CELIA, S.B., A.M. 

(Mrs. Sydney P. Sargent) 

Associate Professor of Chemistr y 
SAVAGE, JANE RAMSDELL, S.B. 

Assistant in Chemistry 
SELIGSON, ISAAC, A.M., S.M. 

Lecturer on Social Work and Government 
SHAFFER, KENNETH RAYMOND, A.B., B.S. in L.S. 

Professor of Ltl/rary Science, Director of the School of Library 

Science, and Director of the Library 
SILK, LEONARD SOLOMON, A.B,, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Economics 
SLONIMSKY, NICOLAS 

Lecturer on Music 
SMITH, RUSSELL TRAIN, A.B., M.Arch. 

Lecturer on Fine Arts, and Art Director of the Prozram in 

Graphic and Publishine, Arts 
SOLINGER,JULIAN LOUIS, Ph.B., S.M. .Ph.D.. B.Ed. 

Associate Professor of Biolog y 
SOLOMON, HARRY CAESAR, S.B., M.D. 

Lectures on Clinical Psychiatry 
SOLOMON, MAIDA HERMAN, A.B., SB. 

(Mrs. Harry C. Solomon) 

Associate Professor of Social Economy 
SPAULDING, MARGARET FRENCH, SB, 

Assistant m Institutional Management 
STARR. MARY CATHARINE, Ed, B. A.M. 

Associate Professor of Home Economics Education 
STEARNS. HOWARD OLIVER, S.M. 

Associate Professor of Physics 



STEIGER, GEORGE NYE, Ph.D. 

Professor of History, Chairman of the Division of Social 

Studies, and Dean of the Guidance Division 
STIMSON, MARJORY, R.M., S.B., A.M. 

Professor of Public Health Nursing 
STUART, JESSIE MILDRED, B.S. in Ed., A.M. 

Associate Professor of Retailing 
SULLIVAN. MARY ALICE 

Assistant in the Office, School of Social Work 
SWEENEY, CLARE LOUISE. A.B., S.B., Ed.M. 

Assistant Professor of Office Management 
SWENSON, ORVAR, A.B,, M.D. 

Lecturer on Surgery 
SYPHER. WYLIE, Ph.D. 

Professor of English, and Chairman of the Division of Lan- 
guage, Literature, and the. Arts 
TANENBAUM, SYBIL, A.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
TARTAKOFF, HELEN HERLIHY, Ph.B , M.D. 

(Mrs. Joseph TartakofF) 

Special Lecturer on Analytic Psychology 
TIMM, JOHN ARREND, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Director of the School of Science, and 

Chairman of the Division of Science 
TOSDAL, BARBARA, S.B. 

Instructor in Retailing 
TOWNSEND. S, PAUL 

Technical Assistant in Physics 
TROTMAN. LENA LORETTA 

Assistant in the Office of the Medical Training, Project 
TURNER, WALLACE MANAHAN, A.M. 

Professor of Accountancy, Emeritus 
UPDEGRAFF, ALICE BETTY, B.N., R.N., A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Public Health Nursing 
VAL2, DINO GRIS, A.B. 

Lecturer on Book and AUgazine Publishing 
n'AUGHN, JAMES ABBOTT, LL.B., M.BA- 

Directorof Public Relations, and Lectureron Economics 
WARREN, CATHERINE, B.S. in Phys. Ed, 

Special Instructor in Physical Therapy 
WATKINS, ARTHUR LANCASTER, AB.. M.D. 

Lectureron Physical Medicine and Electrotherapy, and Medical 

Co-Director of the Program in Physical Therapy 
WEAVER, FRANCES JEAN, S.B. 

Manager of the Lunchroom, and Special Instructor in Institu- 
tional Management 
WELFLING, WELDON. Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics 
WHITE, BLANCHE DIMOND, S.B. 

(Mrs. George L. White) 

Special Lectureron Public Health Nutrition 
WHITE, EVA WHITING, S.B. 

(Mrs, W. D. White) 

Professor of Social Economy 
WILLIAMS, DOROTHY' FRANCES. S.B. 

Managing Editor of the Simmons Review, and Special 

Instructor in Aiaga^ine Publishing 
WISSING, EGON GEORGE. M.D. 

Roentgenologist 
WITTON, CATHERINE JONES, A.M. 

(Mrs. Catherine J. Witton) 

Associate Professor of Biolog y 
ZNAMENSKY, GEORGE ALEXANDROVICH, B.D. , 
Ed.M. 

Lectureron Russian 

■Director of the Fiftieth Anoiversary Appeal, 1948-49 



Arizona Becomes State; 
Forty-eight States Now 

Honor System A Success 



23 



From the tea 




Vaughn and Sals giver watch. 



And Tony just waits. 




24 



CHARLES WILLIAM ELLIOT • THOMAS EDISON • G. B. SHAW 



table to the baseball diamond. 



More behind the scenes but always ready to help 
our Simmons girl in a time of need are the members 
of the staff at Simmons. A helpful word from a de- 
partment secretary or a conference with a class 
assistant smooths the four years along. And when 
our ski-minded Sally comes back with a broken leg 
or ankle Tony is always ready to ride her to the 
fourth-floor library in the elevator. 

If there is a movie that has to be shown in the 
lounge at 4:10 all Simmons girls know that How- 
ard will be there to see that it is run off on time and 
if a Christmas party without a Santa Claus looks 
like a near disaster — Joe Fink can supply the mis- 
sing costume. 

In spite of the fact that the average Sally can't 
see how her faculty could function without her, 
they manage to have their annual Christmas party 
for the children of the staff and faculty, and even 
the faculty wives have formed from the instructors' 
club. 

But as usual the girls have the last word and at 
senior-faculty supper in April they announce their 
favorite professors. (This is the night that the male 
instructors leave their wives at home.) Miss Ina 
Granarra and Mr. Wylie Sypher were so named by 
the Class of '49 at a gathering before graduation. 

Miss Daniel son flays and the faculty marches. 




25 



ROMAIN ROLLAND 



ALEXANDER BELL 



LOUIS BRANDEIS 




Eleanor Tufts, President 



The first student organization at Simmons Col- 
lege was formed in 1902, called the Student Guild. 
This was the seed of the Student Government of 
1949. Every student in the College was automati- 
cally a member of the Guild, which operated in 
chapter divisions of twenty-five girls in each 
chapter. The executive council which directed 
activities included a president, secretary, treasurer, 
and four vice-presidents, one from each of the Col- 
lege's schools. 

When the Guild joined the Women's Intercol- 
legiate Association for Student Government in 
1907 the problems of extending the branches of self- 
government were being met by committees such as 
the Council on Dormitory Government and the 
Committee on Student Conduct. These committees 
were without authority and could function only 
in an advisory capacity; yet they were typical of 
the methods used by other member colleges in the 
Association. It became increasingly apparent that 
precedents were inadequate, that a progressive 
system of student government must be developed 
within the college to meet the needs of the students 
of that college. This was the beginning of a liberal, 
inclusive student government at Simmons. By 1912 
the College and the number of its clubs had so 
increased that a complete revision of the Guild's 
constitution and a redelegation of its authority 



Our pride and respon- 



was planned. Chapter division of students was 
dropped; authority was vested in a Guild Council 
of the president and vice-president of each class, a 
graduate representative, presidents of the clubs, 
the chairmen of the committees on dorm govern- 
ment and student conduct, and presided over by the 
senior class president. This Council is, in effect, 
paralleled by 1949's Interclub Council. 

The next year the (JVild Council passed the 




rd of grades was to be 

ffice in any organiza- 

5, Persimmons, the 

ored by the Coun- 

as further revised; 

Student Government 

from then on was all- 



ruling that a certain st^ 
maintained in orde 
tion; and in the 
first college magazir 
cil. That year the c? 
the Council was reil 
Association; Stu-G pres 
college elected. 

By 1923 Student Government looked back on 
twenty years of progress and gradual extension of 
authority. The Stu-G constitution provided for 
council approval of new organization and the 
authority to grant charters to new, proved groups. 
Clubs were required to submit their budgets to 
Stu-G for approval at the beginning of each year 
and for an audit of accounts at the end of the college 
year. The fundamentals of maintaining a relatively 

The council tneets to talk it over. 




26 



sibilityf Student Government. 




Honor Board and Dorm Council settle matters of student discipline. 



high degree of self-government were quite well es- 
tablished, and during the following years Stu-G 
worked to develop and clarify the purpose of an 
honor system. 

At the beginning of Student Guild in 1902 the 
need for an honor system was recognized, but the 
problems of its function and authority seemed 
almost insoluble. By 1906 students were given a 
trial; the June exams that year were unproctored, 
and each student signed the statement, "I have 




neither given or received aid." This system ap- 
parently worked, but by 1911 a new plan was put 
into effect in an attempt to overcome the student's 
indifference and reluctance to report dishonesty. 
Each course voted on whether or not to accept the 
honor system for that particular course; one hun- 
dred percent affirmative vote was necessary for its 
acceptance. 

Until 1931 this approach to a "system" of honor 
was used, with minor modifications. In 1931 in- 
dividual pledges were discontinued. Every student 
admitted to Simmons College was automatically 
responsible to the Honor System. Signatures on the 
certificate of admission were not, and are not, 
required, but the very small number who have not 
signed the Honor System's pledge in the past eight- 
een years is proof of its justness and its liberality. 
During the 1930's Stu-G strengthened this new 
Honor System and adapted it to dormitory as well 
as class regulations. 



/ Women 


Suffra3e 


Passed; 




N States to Decide 


Issue 




*s„Jvlillion 


for Endowment Fur 


id 



27 




The honorable Miss Jane Bond. 



We are Stu-G . . . 



This year Student Government Council started in 
September with the Workshop to coordinate the 
year's plans for student activities through clubs, 
committees, and publications. The plan to ask for 
volunteers before all student nominations was put 
into operation. A political forum, an all-college 
organization, was proposed early in the school 
year; its purpose is to integrate and strengthen 
political activity, assembly programs on current 
political questions, and to precipitate wider inter- 
est in community, state, national, and international 
governments. Temporary officers were elected to a 
provisional executive board; representatives of the 
political forums of other colleges were invited to 
speak at Stu-G open meetings; the proposed Forum 
constitution was posted on Stu-G's bulletin board. 
By February, Forum was ready to be voted on, and 
during the two days of balloting an overwhelming 
majority of the students ratified the Constitution 
and the Forum became a major branch of 1949's 
Stu-G. 



Christmas formal means a knockout 



May Day means the standouts. 




28 



DAVID LLOYD GEORGE * ORVILLE WRIGHT * FRITZ KREISLER 



The sum of its parts, a part of the total. 



In December, just before the Christmas week- 
end of Compels, Christmas Pageant, Glee Club 
Vespers, Stu-G Formal, and Olde English Dinner, 
Simmons Student Government was hostess to the 
Greater Boston Student Government Council. At 
this meeting, with representatives from twenty-six 
Boston colleges, Eleanor Tufts was elected chair- 
man of the Greater Boston Council; and out of this 
and later meetings of the Council came the serious 
realization of how much greater in many respects 
is the self-government of Simmons students than 
that permitted in other colleges, both in Boston 
and in the rest of the country. 

This realization underscored the Christmas festiv- 
ities that are traditions sponsored by classes, clubs, 
and Student Government; it was the theme that 
accompanied subsequent Stu-G activities. The 
traditions like Bib Party, Pops Night, Field Day, 
Junior Welcoming Committee, Hall Table, May 
Day, and the innovations that included this year 
the student production of H.M.S. Pinafore, Stu-G 



The V.P.'s talk it o 



Workshop, the library-loan plan, the toy drive, and 
Forum, are important in themselves. 

But these and all the other activities that have 
added immeasurably to the academic and profes- 
sional areas of college life assume much greater 
importance as indications of the scope and security 
of individual and group responsibility Simmons 
students have attained in forty-seven years. Re- 
sponsibility, respect, and freedom become synony- 
mous when applied to students governing them- 
selves through their own Student Government. 



Something doing every day oj the iveekfor Ellen Manning. 




29 



EDWARD W. BOK • KAISER WILHELM • MARSHAL FOCH 




immons College was founded to enable young women to gain an independent 

livelihood just fifty years ago and in the ensuing time the College has endeavored 

to fulfill that wish of John Simmons. Various schools have been added 

and developed as times have changed and needs became apparent, and so today the 

girl entering Simmons has before her a wide range from which to choose her 

career. The training that Simmons offers is unique in that it gives a college 

student a liberal arts background and a training in a professional field as 

well. Many of the graduates each year go on to do graduate study and 

many others start out to work immediately. But they always have the interest 

of Simmons and their particular school at heart and year after year offer 

suggestions towards improvement, expansion, and new possibilities. Part of the 

training in the professional fields comes when each senior goes out on practice 

work for two weeks of her senior year and becomes acquainted with 

conditions and possibilities in her field of interest and work. Each year 

girls return to College with reports of just how valuable their 

training has been. Simmons girls are confident that when they graduate they 

have the best training they can get, the best faculty, and the best of advice. 




Times have changed and methods of teaching as well as 
cooking. 



:i 



I 





W^^^-^iii^iiirtlliiWiii^iifji 





::^5^.-^ 




*..,J''''**3SS!!a;<L 



jbydMM'. 



ni JUm£6^ 



There^s more to business than Gregg and a 




Just as Louise Randall Pierson oi Roughly Speaking 
fame, many other girls came to Simmons business 
school in 1903 to learn to be independent. Daring 
young ladies, these, and ambitious. With the guid- 
ance of Edward H. Eldridge, the school's first 
director, they studied not only English, languages, 
history, science, and commercial law and geog- 
raphy but were introduced immediately to the 
'booms and depressions' of the secretary's day — 
typing and shorthand. 

By 1949 standards, the jobs open to these early 
graduates were discouragingly limited. The girls, 
well-educated and equipped for competition in the 
world of prejudiced business men, personified 
Simmons' anticipation of women active in industry, 
art, and science, and had some rather tough pio- 
neering to do those first few years. 

An extremely high degree of proficiency was 
required in typing and shorthand for graduation. 
There were instances in which, regardless of out- 
standing ability in other courses, a student's de- 
ficiency of a fraction of one per cent in typewriting 
was the basis on which the early directors refused 
to recommend that student for graduation. Some 
measures were taken to circumvent this rigidity 
without sacrificing its purpose, a meticulous and 
challangeable reputation for the school's graduates; 
for example, in 1922 the basic accounting course was 



Mr. Paul Sals giver, director of the school. 
Lois Wolf rolls them off. 

Now IV hat do you suppose that would meanl 



32 



carriage throw... Ec and Spanish count too. 




' If you rvant to learn to type, enter Simmons, little girl; you can t go tvrong.' 



offered for juniors as well as seniors, and advanced 
accounting and statistic courses were offered as an 
alternative for senior shorthand and typing courses. 
In spite of, or perhaps because of, these extremely 
high expectations of the school its registration 
during the second decade of the college comprised 
46 per cent of all degrees granted. 

The business school points up perhaps more 
clearly than any other school the increasing trend 
toward a firmly established place for women in 
positions of executive responsibility. Of course the 
shift from being something handy around an office, 
along with an eraser and a dictionary, to a position 
as director of public relations, or managing her own 
business was not done entirely by the throw of the 
carriage. Emphasis upon academic courses has never 
been lessened. Balance, equation, is important in 
much more than statistics and accounting, and this 
has been a guiding principle of the school's direc- 
tors. Mr. Paul L. Salsgiver, present director, points 
to the catalogue as an eloquent statement of the 
place in business the graduate of 1949 may till — 
medicine, science, diplomacy, inter-American com- 
merce, advertising, personnel, and more to which, 
roughly speaking, the typewriter is only one key. 

BUSINESS SCHOOL 



Scribunal was organized in 1940 to give the stu- 
dents and faculty of the business school an oppor- 
tunity to meet on a social basis outside the class- 
room. Membership in Scribunal is open to the up- 
perclassmen, and speakers for the meetings are 
chosen to add some of the incidentals of secretarial 
training in a strictly social setting. This year the 
November meeting featured an Avon representative, 
demonstrating the effective use of cosmetics, and 
in March there was a meeting at which flower ar- 
rangements for home and office were exhibited. 

And to prove that even a business school girl's 
mind isn't strictly on business we held a joint 
meeting in March with home ec and English clubs, 
and learned "how to plan a wedding." 

Purely social meetings included the Christmas 
party with Ellen Richards club, and in May we 
revived an old club activity, the Scribunal banquet. 



Bloody Sunday in Moscow 
Czar Grants Constitution 

Glee Club at Jordan Hall 



33 



Pica wise and point foolish ^ English school 




The School of English was founded as an educa- 
tional experiment in 1930 by Dr. Robert M. Gay 
in recognition of the fact that the "reading-writ- 
ing" girl at Simmons College could be directed to 
fill a place unique in the woman's business world of 
the 1930's. In 1934 his first class was graduated 
prepared to work in an editorial office or publishing 
house, or prepared to teach. 

Professional training for editing and publishing 
during those first years was based on a minimum of 
courses: Journalistic Fundamentals, Manuscript 
and Proof, Use of a Library, and Book Publishing 
and Magazine Journalism. These courses repre- 
sented the primaries of technical acumen; as Dr. 
Gay's graduates proved their ability in the limited 
jobs of the time, larger responsibilities and new 
areas of publishing and editing were opened to 
Simmons-trained girls. New courses were added 
to the curriculum, others were revised, further 
advances into the technical fields were anticipated; 
and today an English school student has the oppor- 
tunity to specialize in a program that affiliates with 
another school such as business or home economics, 
or in a particular direction within the English 
school. In 1945 the school was separated from the 
Division of Language, Literature, and the Arts and 
Mr. Raymond F. Bosworth became the Director 
of the school. 



The word you want is... Mr. Kayinond F. Bosworth, 

director of the school. 
And where would we be without Ginnyl 
"If this were my ^ro ject" ; three seniors advise another on the 
Valz, dilemma. 



34 



OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES • WOODROW WILSON • ELIHU ROOT 



slaves over projects and papers. 




Creative tvriting, lOflOO words and Boz 



The problem of apportioning academic and pro- 
fessional courses proved even more acute in the 
School of English than in other schools, as any 
type of literary work, technical or creative, neces- 
sitates a liberal arts background. Dr. Gay's basic 
pattern seems to have solved the problem very 
well; more than three years of language and litera- 
ture, art and music, science, and the social sciences 
are required, with intensive training in editing and 
publishing skills during the third and fourth years. 

Perhaps no other school has such direct contact 
with its professional field. First is the two weeks' 
practice work that each student has in her senior 
year. At this time each senior in the English school 
has the opportunity of doing work in the field of 
her choice whether it be book publishing, maga- 
zine editing, advertising copywriting, layout, 
writing, publicity or any of the types of work in 
the graphic arts field for which she is trained. 

Apprenticeship on the staff of the newly reorgan- 
ized Simmons Review, under the editorship of Miss 
Dorothy Williams, is another of the direct applica- 
tions of the skills and knowledge that each English 

ENGLISH SCHOOL 



s wit. 



school senior must demonstrate. The Keview is 
published four times during the academic year and 
each girl works on one issue. At that time she is 
responsible for all the work that has to be done on 
her own articles: writing of material, organization 
of art work, layout, proofreading, and promotion. 
At the end of this training she has a complete 
picture of the entire workings of the magazine. 

A third policy of the school brings the English 
school seniors in even closer relation to the outside 
professional field by the instruction of professionals. 
They are an editor, a layout artist, two journalists, 
a production manager, and an advertising manager 
who bring professional training to the classroom 
for practical application. 



Titanic, World's Largest 
Ship, Sinks in Atlantic 

Sophs Hold May Day Fete 



35 



EAMON DE VALERA • ENRICO CARUSO * RUDYARD KIPLING 



Patterns and pastries^ hio and bicarbonate 



Simmons girls, by nature, lead double lives, but 
Home Eccers arc the original three-in-one girls. 
Not only do they get the professional and academic 
educations that all Simmons girls do, but they grad- 
uate with many a home-making talent tucked 
away under their caps and gowns. 

Since home economics has always been thought 
of as a woman's field, it was among the original 
professional schools at Simmons. In 1902 the 
school was known as the School of Household 
Economics and was an outgrowth of the New Eng- 
land School of Housekeeping and the Boston Cook- 
ing School. In the early days the Home Eccers 
counted dust mops, carpet sweepers, and wash- 
boards as regular equipment, and spent countless 
hours in the kitchen cooking and re -cooking a dish 
until they could turn our a "perfect sample." 

But home economics has changed in half a cen- 
tury and so has the Simmons School of Home 
Economics. Graduates are no longer limited to 
teaching positions or a few opportunities in lunch- 
room management. The goals of the students are 
broad and varied and the training they get has 
grown and developed with the changing demands 
in the home-economics field. 

A student who emphasizes dietetics, nutrition. 



chemistry of foods, institutional accounting, and 
management may find herself in a hospital diet 
kitchen or managing an institutional lunchroom. 
If her program is heavy with textile technology, 
physics, and math, she might be testing fabrics for 
durability and color fastness upon graduation. Or 
she might combine a program in home ec with one 
in English for journalism or article writing and 
thus be trained for writing on home economics for 
a woman's magazine, the household pages of a 
newspaper or for radio work on the same subject. 
Today's home ec girl could teach or do extension 
work; she could work in a food manufacturer's 
testing kitchen or she could design clothes. 

Another and increasingly popular field is in child 
development and many Simmons seniors spend one 
semester at Merrill-Palmer in Detroit or in a similar 
school in Boston working along the line of child 
development and teaching. 

The School of Home Economics has broadened 
its curricula so that students in other schools may 
take Home Economics 10, a course in family living 
and home management. The course was so popular 
when it was first given last year that it was offered 
both semesters of the 1948-49 year and was even 
then over-subscribed. The "non-home eccers" who 



Whatever girls should know. . .but cooking and seiving are only a -part. 




36 



CHARLES EVAN HUGHES * BABE RUTH • ANATOLE FRANCE 



lead to the Home Ec degree. 



take this course are offered the same opportunity 
as the regular students in the school to live in Pil- 
grim House on campus for a period of eight weeks, 
having all the responsibility and fun of running 
the practice house that regular home ec girls have. 

It is at Pilgrim House that the College operates 
the Nursery School and Simmons girls have the 
opportunity of developing an understanding of the 
behavior of children and the problems involved in 
their guidance. Girls in home ec often spend their 
summers working in allied fields that offer first- 
hand experience in the profession. 

Home Economics Club is not only a social organ 
for the students in the School but it also serves as a 
contact with the professional field. When the club 
was founded in 1924 its purpose was to make the 
members conscious of being part of a professional 
group. 

The first monthly meeting this year featured a 
demonstration of stenciling and textile painting. 
For the November meeting the club delved into the 
Simmons past with Dr. Kenneth L. Mark, former 
head of the School of Science. 



HOME ECONOMICS 



Dike// Bjerke and Home Ec Club officers talk it over. 
A tuck here and a pleat there. 

Miss Elda Kobh, director, helps plan a program. 




37 



HENRY CABOT LODGE • CYRUS H. CURTIS • WILL ROGERS 



The Librarians make merry , they have the 




The librarian of fory-six years ago was con- 
cerned mainly with giving casual, neighborly serv- 
ice in local libraries or with performing the end- 
less classification, cataloguing, and other clerical 
work necessary in the large libraries. The libra- 
rian's duties in the early 1900's were so similar to 
those of a secretary that the library school was 
closely identified with the business school. The 
curriculum of the library school, however, has 
shifted repeatedly to adapt to the more than four 
decades of change in the profession of librarian. 

Formulation of the first program for training 
librarians was in charge of Mary Esther Robbins, 
assisted by an advisory council of the heads of 
large libraries in the vicinity. Their program for 
1903 spread the technical instruction of the pro- 
spective librarians over the four undergraduate 
years. A typical freshman struggled under the 
burden of cataloguing, library economy, typewrit- 
ing, French, German, English, and hygiene. 

Growing interest in the social and cultural facets 
of library work rather than the technical skills in- 
volved, required less time to be alloted to the tech- 
nical courses, so that by 1908 the freshman year 
had become completely academic. The present plan, 
first outlined in 1918, concentrates all technical 
subjects in the senior year. 



Director Shaffer 
Men yet. 
CataU 



38 



only men in the college. 




Kesearch, reading, reliability: the three r's of the library. 



Barbar Berthelson, Carol Anne Prissey 
Dianne Sloniin, Arthur Eagan, Jean Schmidt. 



To meet the growing opportunities for the 
library school graduate in business libraries, in 
research, in government departments or libraries, 
the student of 1920 was required to have four weeks 
of practice work, two weeks during the summer 
vacation before the senior year and two weeks 
during the senior year itself. 

The demand for Simmons' library school grad- 
uates reached its all-time high in June, 1947, Mr. 
Kenneth R. Shaffer, present director of the school, 
points out, when there were at least thirty excellent 
jobs for each graduate of the school. Alumnae 
found positions awaiting them in the library di- 
visions of the armed services and in government 
and allied agencies, which added to the impressive 
number of fields the librarian of 1949 may consider. 

Future plans for the library school include a new 
curriculum revision. The school will be prepared 
to offer three unified programs; a general graduate 
program, a graduate program in special librarian- 
ship, and a four-year undergraduate program sim- 
ilar to the present one. The new program is but one 
step further in realizing the purpose of the school 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



of Library Science — to equip its graduates to fulfill 
significant, responsible parts in the modern world 
of social and technological progress. 

The 020 on that poster on Poster Row is the 
Dewey Decimal classification number for library 
science, and the poster is no doubt announcing a 
020 club meeting in the lounge, or one of the Thurs- 
day afternoon teas that have become a part of the 
pleasant informality of faculty and student rela- 
tions. The club was organized in 1932 to provide a 
basis for more extensive social and professional 
contact between students, faculty, and outstanding 
members of the profession. This year the club has 
set two precedents: Mr. Arthur Eagan is the first 
of the school's men students to hold office in the 
club; and the traditional spring banquet was re- 
placed by a picnic in May. 



1 Rooseve t h 


ovs 


' Reveals 


1 ^' 


s. 


Coup 


in 


Panama 


\^ Sanroma at 


Assembly 



39 



It would be a pleasure to he sick with a 



In 1916 an anonymous gift of $4,000 was sent to 
Simmons College to pay the salary of an assistant 
professor of public-health nursing for two years. 
This gift precipitated the establishment of a pro- 
gram that in 1919 was officially (and for the first 
time publicly) called the School of Public Health 
Nursing. The school was supervised by Miss Anne 
H. Strong of Simmons, and maintained by the 
College and the Association; but it was not until 
1933 that the school became free of financial com- 
plications and was absorbed into the new School of 
Nursing of Simmons College. 

The program of the School of Nursing includes 
study both at the College and in Boston hospitals. 
A student enrolled in the undergraduate program 
spends two and a half years of the five-year term 
at the College. This period of study includes two, 
six-week summer sessions at the Peter Bent Brig- 
ham and Massachusetts General Hospitals. 

In January of her junior year, she enters either 
one of these hospitals for a year of general clinical 
experience. In the following hospital year she 
spends five months studying pediatric and com- 
municable disease nursing at Children's Hospital, 
three months in obstetric nursing at Boston 



Lying-in Hospital, and another three months study- 
ing psychiatric nursing at McLean Hospital. A tea 
for the junior students and their parents, which 
will be held each year in November, has replaced 
the traditional capping ceremony. The students 
now will receive their caps automatically at the 
beginning of the freshman summer session when 
they first wear their uniforms. 

Openings for a graduate of the School of Nursing 
are expanding rapidly as new branches of medicine 
are developed. The opportunities for specialization 
range from post-graduate work in industrial, psy- 
chiatric or orthopedic nursing to medicine or sur- 
gery. The Army and Navy Nurse Corps and the 
U.S. Public Health Service have created many new 
positions; the nurse of 1949 may go abroad in the 
government service, or become an air-line hostess. 

Among important plans for the future is a pro- 
posed affiliation with the Massachusetts Eye and 
Ear Infirmary, for experience in eye, ear, nose and 
throat nursing. Also, the School of Nursing hopes 
to give all its students some experience in nursery- 
school work. To keep up with the growing demand 
for post-graduate study, the N-IV program, or 
degree program for graduate nurses, is being ex- 



The caps come before the B.S. 



Physics problems start nurses at the bottom. 



:^^tf:sism 







\i n 



v-^^-^^ 2^^'' 



^1 '4 9 ^^^ 




40 



JOHN SINGER SARGENT * LUTHER BURBANK • W. B. YEATS 



Simmons nurse to hold your hand. 



panded. More and more veterans and nurses in 
general are entering this two-and-a-half year course 
in recognition of the vital importance of a bach- 
elor's degree in securing high positions in the nurs- 
ing profession. 

The Anne Strong Club is one of the older clubs at 
Simmons. It was organized in 1930 at the request of 
a group of nursing students who felt the need of a 
chance to meet fellow students and discuss their 
profession. 

The club has always been run entirely by the 
girls within the Nursing school. The meetings are 
held once a month and students from affiliating 
hospitals are invited to them as well as the girls 
still studying at the college. Through these meet- 
ings, the club provides a link between the nursing 
school office and the students. Suggestions for 
changes in the curriculum and recommendations 
for improvements in the school program in general 
are discussed at meetings and taken to the head of 
the school for her consideration. 

This year, the program committee scheduled 
speakers from the medical profession. These talks 
introduce new developments in the medical and 
nursing fields, and bring new opportunities for 
nurses to the attention of the students. 

NURSING SCHOOL 




Miss Lyndon McCarroll, director. 

Dissection labs. 
Plans brew better over a ci/p of tea. 



41 



GEORGES CLEMENCEAU • RAMSEY MACDONALD • J. P. MORGAN 



Prepro preps Sally for study after Simmons 




The student in the Preprofessional school at 
Simmons is a girl with ambition and foresight for 
she sees beyond her B.S. degree to graduate train- 
ing in one of several professional fields. At Simmons 
she is getting the broad basic education in litera- 
ture, history, language and the social and natural 
sciences which is a prerequisite to professional 
training in many fields. 

It was in response to the requirement of graduate 
schools of medicine, social work and library science 
of a bachelor's degree for admission that the School 
of Preprofessional Studies was formed in 1938. This 
baby among the schools at Simmons holds a unique 
position when compared to the other schools with- 
in the College. Prepro does not offer technical 
training itself, but rather prepares for technical 
training on the graduate level. Vocational orienta- 
tion is Dr. Harrison L. Harley's description of the 
school's work. Its aim, however, is the same as any 
of its fellow schools, the aim expressed in John 
Simmons' will: to educate young women for a 
useful and gainful role in society. 

The program of the school is three-fold. Girls 
who plan to enter library schools take basic courses 
in economics, psychology, and sociology and choose 
electives that will bestfit their professional interests. 
Courses in biology, chemistry, and physics for the 



Dr. Harley, prepro' s guiding light. 
They study lit, psych, ec, languages, and science. 




42 



many a potential Ph.D. 




A perennial favorite, psych with Miss Jones. 



future scientific librarian; more economics for the 
girl with her eye on a business library, child psy- 
chology and oral English for the prospective 
children's librarian and story-teller. Girls planning 
to enter schools of social work concentrate on the 
social sciences, history, economics, psychology, 
and sociology, electing courses in literature, music, 
and art to give them the broad background they 
will need working with people. 

Since the requirements of medical schools are so 
varied, the Prepro girl who wishes to enter medi- 
cine, dentistry, nursing, or any of the allied fields 
plans her undergraduate program in accordance 
with those requirements. Education is another end 
toward which the Preprofessional school leads. 
Girls interested in teaching, especially social stud- 
ies, science, and English, can plan adequate pro- 
grams with Dr. Har ley's aid and advice. 

Prepro offers no special club for its students the 
way that many of the professional schools do, but 
the girl enrolled in the preprofessional school finds 
many outside interests to take up any free time she 
may have. Many of the girls have worked as vol- 

PREPROFESSIONAL SCHOOL 



unteer teachers in settlement houses in Boston and 
have found other outside work in connection with 
their chosen field of study. Their names are on the 
membership lists of all the extracurricula activities 
at Simmons. Oftentimes they are able to find free 
period in which they can take a favorite course 
that is denied to their sisters in the other schools 
because of technical requirements and for this rea- 
son are often the envy of other Simmons girls. 

Prepro girls with their goal clearly in view and 
with Dr. Harley's capable guidance behind them 
will leave Simmons ready to start their professional 
training. Some of them will remain active Simmons 
students at the School of Social Work or the School 
of Library Science for the next year or two. The 
others will be scattered among graduate schools 
throughout the countrv. 



Wilson to Force Draft 
Joffre Asks Troops Now 

^New "PS" on Sale Monday 



43 



Fashion focus . . . you can always tell a 



Could he history of fashion. 

A ready wit. Director Beckley 
Princesses at Prince. 





The Prince School of Retailing is not one of the 
younger Simmons schools — it was founded in 1905; 
yet academically retail education is the child of 
this half-century. When Mrs. Lucinda Wyman 
Prince started a kind of Susan B. Anthony crusade 
against long hours and short pay for shopgirls it 
was with social service rather than education in 
mind. Education was her pass key; a good social 
and economic position for the shopgirl was the 
treasure. At that time, and for several years follow- 
ing, the employee's needs were the primary consid- 
eration, since salesgirls were often payed as little 
as one dollar a day for eight and ten hours of work. 

Mrs. Prince believed these conditions would be 
improved if the efficiency of the salesgirl was im- 
proved. She began a program for training sales- 
women in 1905 in connection with the Women's 
Educational and Industrial Union; and slowly 
gained the cooperation of heads of large department 
stores; but few merchants were easily convinced 
that salesmanship was a thing that could be taught. 

Although retailing was and is generally consid- 
ered a woman's field, there were only limited places 
for women in executive positions before World War 
I; the teaching of selling methods was the largest 



44 



GABRIELE D'ANNUNZIO * FRANZ WERFEL • BENITO MUSSOLINI 



Prince school girl or grad. 



concession cautious Boston retailers would make 
for several years. By 1915, however, the year the 
program became the School of Salesmanship of 
Simmons College, this unprecedented plan of edu- 
cation in merchandise, store arithmetic, selling 
technics, and fashion promotion was established 
and proving Mrs. Prince's point that salesmanship 
could be taught in the classroom and the efficient 
salesgirl is an important figure in the business 
world. 

Originally only college graduates were admitted 
to the school, renamed Prince School of Retailing 
in 1942, for the advanced courses in retailing and 
merchandising. In 1944 a program of undergraduate 
study was initiated; freshman and sophomore years 
are taken at Simmons, and professional retailing 
courses at Prince for the junior and senior years. 
A one-year program for college graduates leads to 
the degree of Master of Science. 

Aware that preparation for practical work can- 
not be provided in the classroom only, the school 
includes in its program a six-week period of super- 
vised store work during the Christmas season; and 
most students continue store work during the 
summer vacations. 



Although the earlier emphasis was placed upon 
the shopgirl's needs, the current development 
within retail education and the retail business 
world underlines the importance of the basic 
issues of labor and management relations, profits 
and wages, private business and government con- 
trols, all deeply involved with the fundamentals 
of human rights, security, and happiness. Applica- 
tion of technical skills alone does not fulfill the 
role of a Prince graduate. Mr. Donald K. Beckley, 
director of the school says the future in retailing 
depends "upon having executives who can think 
beyond traditional procedures to basic causes." 
The mutual interests of management and personnel 
have become the focal point of the second post- 
war period of the century; and the Prince school 
girl is aware that, man's world, woman's world, 
labor's world, or management's, her place in the 
world is economically unique as of this century. 
Her goal is to make that place a useful one. 



PRINCE SCHOOL 



M.orning coffee in the Prince lounge and a study of retailing. 




45 



CHARLES A. LINDBERGH • THOMAS MANN * VANNEVAR BUSH 



Scientific sojourn means hours of lab for our 



V^ 




The School of Science in 1903 was the orphan of 
the College. Dr. Henry Lefavour's "Report on a 
Program of Orientation" introduced it as being 
justified under the purpose of John Simmons' will 
"for those who wish to prepare themselves for 
medical studies of advanced scientific work. . .for 
those who do not wish a college course involving 
the study of ancient languages. .. entailing little 
or no additional expense to the College." Dr. Ken- 
neth L. Mark afterwards wrote: "We had visions 
of a female Institute of Technology." Extensive 
equipment was purchased, and the library was the 
equal of any other New England college. Although 
only four per cent of the student enrollment entered 
the science school, this four per cent had the very 
best individual instruction that was available. 

For another reason the small enrollment proved 
an advantage; in the early 1900's placement oppor- 
tunities for women in the scientific field were few. 
Most of the girls became teachers and some became 
research assistants. 

Both world wars, however, proved a stimulus 
for the School of Science. With the number of men 
available for scientific jobs cut to a new low, w^om- 
en scientists were in greater demand than ever 
before. In 1919 the new field of hospital laboratory 



None other than Dr. Ttmm. 
Will it frecipitatel 

Those hours of lab reports 



46 



hardest working Sallies. 




Four long years of biology. 



M-arilyn Oberle, Veronica Aslanian, 
Ellen Richards Officers 



technichians opened up and for twenty years em- 
ployed half of the science graduates. 

Today, the orphan of the College has become one 
of the important schools. Dr. John A. Timm, direc- 
tor, says the number of hours in the courses arc 
prodigious; that it has become almost a college 
within a college, for the science school branches 
out in many directions, each student specializing 
in one or another branch. 

The opportunities for placement are now almost 
unlimited. Graduates are bacteriologists, medical 
technicians, biologists, chemists, literature re- 
search workers, and teachers. Last year a new pro- 
gram in Physical Therapy was offered for the first 
time, the school working with the Children's Hos- 
pital, the Massachusetts General Hospital, and the 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. This year a valuable 
program in Orthoptics has been started in affilia- 
tion with the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. 

In May, 1920, a group of biology seniors met at 
Professor Curtis Jillard's home in Wellesley and 
organized the Ellen Richards Club, the first tech- 



SCIENCE SCHOOL 



nical school club in the College. The name, Ellen 
Richards, is that of the pioneer woman scientist of 
America, and it still symbolizes the ideal of the 
Ellen Richards Club member today. 

The purpose of the club was to promote interest 
in the sciences, and to cultivate good fellowship 
between those specializing in the sciences. That 
purpose IS still being met in 1949. 

Membership was open originally only to juniors 
and seniors in the science school and later was 
extended to all students in the School of Science. 

Under the direction of Marilyn Oberle, club 
president this year, many interesting meetings with 
discussions of scientific subjects and with guest 
speakers were held. 



I Len 


in Flees to 


Finland 


I Europe on Kn 


Fe 


Edge 


V. Dr. 


Gay 


Publish* 


2S Book 



47 



Strictly for grads, hut one of our best known 



Simmons School of Social Work was the first of 
its kind in the country at the time of its founding. 
The commonly accepted method of training work- 
ers for "philanthropic undertakings" was appren- 
ticeship, and the College, recognizing the im- 
portance of more adequate and progressive methods 
established the third independent school for social 
workers in the country, and the first school to offer 
four years of study in this field. For sixteen years 
Dr. Jeffrey R. Brackett served as director, assisted 
by Miss Zilpha Smith, and both are recognized as 
outstanding pioneers in the education of social 
workers. 

The School has developed during its forty-five 
years from a four-year undergraduate department 
of Simmons into a strictly graduate program of 
studies. In 1904, the year of its founding, Simmons 
and Harvard University worked together to main- 
tain a school for the "study of charity, correction, 
neighborhood uplift... and social problems by 
practical methods"; during the twelve years this 
affiliation lasted the graduate students' and the 
seniors' programs were the same, involving tech- 
nical courses, supervised work in an accredited 
agency, and a thesis in the chosen field, whether 
neighborhood, family, or industrial relations. 



After the first world war revisions in the cur- 
riculum echoed an increasing progress within the 
profession. The scope of the social worker was 
broadened to include medical, psychiatric, recrea- 
tional, and "Americanization" work. The Young 
Men's and Young Women's Christian and Hebrew 
Associations are major developments of this Ameri- 
canization program; through these and similar or- 
ganizations professionally trained units of men and 
women worked to give immigrants of the war a 
balanced perspective of this country's arts, science, 
and industry. 

The local charitable bureaus were still largely 
managed by Boston's "aristocracy", but the posi- 
tion of the people the School's graduates worked 
with was aligned by the greater scope of postwar 
social work. The range of fields in which social 
work was vitally needed pointed up the individual 
within these fields. The range of differences within 
any given group was recognized to be greater than 
the range of differences between groups, and 
during the postwar flux attention was shifted to 
the individual in relation to his own environment. 
Plans were scheduled for research in the adaptation 
of social work to other areas such as law, econom- 
ics, and personnel; and by 1936 the program of four- 



The studies are hard hut the sense of service great. 




48 



ARCHIBALD MACLEISH 



EUGENE O'NEILL 



ADOLPH HITLER 



and most popular schools. 




year undergraduate study was withdrawn, and the 
school operated only at the graduate level. 

The two-year program that began during 1936- 
1937 leads to the degree of Master of Science. First- 
year students work mainly in basic courses of 
philosophy and principles of social work, such as 
Government and Social Work, and Principles of 
Human Behavior. Field work begins this year and 
continues for many through the summer. Second- 
year programs are planned for advanced work in 
special fields of medical, social, community, or 
psychiatric research; field work continues. Candi- 
dates for the master's degree are given an oral ex- 
amination upon completion of these two years. 

Becoming the woman she wants to be is the goal 
of every Simmons graduate, and becoming a woman 
the world needs is the natural goal of the School of 
Social Work's graduate. It may be significant that 
the postwar periods of the twentieth century have 
precipitated social work and workers into greater, 
more sensitive areas of living. It is vitally signifi- 
cant that, in spite of urgent needs, rigid standards 
of excellence have continued and been extended, 
and the school's graduates are always able to meet 
these standards. 

SOCIAL WORK 



Comparing notes on field work. 
The genial Miss Hardivick. 

Future Masters study hard. 




49 



F. B. KELLOGG • JAN CHRISTIAN SMUTS • VINCENT SHEEAN 




ally Simmons has always been an active wide-awake college student interested 
in the world about her and interested also in having a good time while 
at College. Even when the first class entered in 1902 the Simmons girls liked 
an after-class cup of coffee or a lime phosphate. Today it's a Coke, 
but the same spirit of friendship still prevails. In order to 
facilitate an exchange of opinions, to better acquaint the prospective graduate 
with the work she will be doing when she leaves Simmons, to provide an 
outlet for the various talents and interest of the college student many 
extracurricula clubs and activities have been formed when the need for them be- 
came apparent to the student body. And when the interest or need 
died out other clubs and activities came along to take their place. Years ago the 
Simmons girl might have belonged to the mandolin club or she might have 
been interested in advanced religious thought and been an active member of the 
Unity Club. Today there is a political forum being organized, 
a Pan-American Club brings together those girls with a strong Latin-American 
interest and Netvs, Mic, and the Revietv offer journalistic outlets. Whether 
in club meeting or a dorm room bull session Sally starts a second life at 4:10. 




We still sit on the back steps to study or to smoke, even 
as they did 30 years ago. 




Haivkes, Kaumo, and Try on. 



Heller., Bell, Hehnan, and Purcell. 




Academy and Arts 



When Academy was founded in 1918 its purpose 
was to provide recognition of scholarship in " those 
courses of study which are of a liberal rather than 
of a technical character," and it was not, officially, 
Simmons' honor society until 1943. During the 
years between, requirements for admission varied 
from the original standard of fifty per cent A's in 
the "liberal" courses, which refers to languages, 
fine arts, and social sciences, to the present require- 
ment of a 3-2 average in all studies for two years 
before appointment to the society. 

The monthly meetings of Academy have usually 
national or international themes, and in the past 
have presented speakers from India, Germany, 
Argentina, Spain, from Harvard, from the F.B.I., 
from the United Nations. This year, in sponsorship 
with three other clubs. Academy presented a series 
of Maya Dreen films which won the international 
grand prize at the Cannes film festival. 

The annual Academy reception for new members 
each Fall is a formal affair to which Academy mem- 
bers escort members of the faculty. Mr. Warren S. 
Tryon, former professor of history at Simmons, and 
Guggenheim Fellow, was guest speaker at the De- 
cember reception this year. 



The English Club, organized with the help of 
Dr. Gay in 1933, had for its purpose the furthering 
of "interest in English as an art and a profession 
among the students of the School of English," and 
the provision of "opportunity for noted speakers 
to address the students on the particular problems 
in their field." 

This year the club dispelled all notions of its 
ties to the English school by revising the constitu- 
tion and sponsoring a contest to rename the club 
to indicate its scope more fully. Socially, the club 
invited Mr. Slonimsky to play at its first meeting, 
arranged with Hillel and Academy for the showing 
of psychological movies, organized a theatre party 
to"Troilus and Cressida." In March, together with 
020 and others, English Club's thoughts followed 
the trends of spring in featuring a wedding con- 
sultant. 



52 



Hablan Espahol, nous parlous Francais 




Lois M.oran, Nayday Valldejuly, Pat Walsh. 



Marjorie Lincoln, Helen Ryan, Alice Chakerian, Mary Massa. 



The Pan-American club at Simmons was formed 
to give American students an opportunity to learn 
about South America and to meet students from 
Latin America who are studying here. By arranging 
parties and obtaining speakers, many through in- 
tercollegiate cooperation, this attempt has been 
very successful. During the school year of 1948 and 
1949 the club has been active, especially in working 
with other colleges. The club has been the guest of 
Harvard's Pan-American Club at many of its meet- 
ings. A Puerto Rican student from the Conserva- 
tory played Latin American carols at the Christmas 
meeting, one of the highlights of the club's cal- 
endar. According to tradition, Latin-American 
food was served, introducing some Pan-Ams to 
unusual kinds of fruits and pastries, and stimulat- 
ing nostalgia for others. On January 14, the Sim- 
mons Pan-American club acted as host at the Pan- 
American Society, a center for inter-American rela- 
tions. There w^ere lectures during the spring by 
Latin-American students at Harvard, and a dance 
at the Hotel Commander ended the year with a 
click of castanets. 



ings presented speakers such as Mme. Andre 
Morize, M. Gustave Ferrarri, and Mr. Ross Lock- 
ridge. The current of the war, its effects, were felt 
upon these themes of music, art, and literature, 
and Le Cercle acted as agent for more direct contact 
between students and French relief agencies, for 
discussions of the role of French women in the war, 
the work of the Resistance, the place of students 
in war relief work. 

Now in 1949, looking sharp to the single-dutied 
customs of Le Cercle in peace time, Mr. Paul Kann 
as club advisor has guided activities toward broad- 
er considerations. A representative of the World 
Federation discussed the role of France in the 
United Nations; Le Cercle's Christmas party was 
for the children of a Boston neighborhood house, 
and Santa Claus had a French accent. 



One of the few clubs to fuse two national cul- 
tural forces, Le Cercle Francais performed double- 
duty during the war years. Traditionally the meet- 



Lindbergh Flies Atlantic 
In Non-stop Journey 

Fire in North Hall 



53 




Simmons girls have always liked to sing and Glee 
Club has been a going concern since 1908, when it 
was founded by twenty-four students, multiplied 
this year to forty-eight. It will keep growing too, 
as long as there are girls to sing and occasions for 
song. 

During its long reign as Simmons's Musical 
Association the club has presented "Stabat Mater" 



Glee Club members Marge Clarke, Betty Riegel, and 
Betty Norberg practice while Sally Ashland plays piano. 



Can you hit a high C? 

with the Harvard Orchestra; it has appeared on 
several radio programs; it has sung at the Women's 
College Club of Boston, and at Jordan Hall. At 
one time during the twenties one group in the 
Association was the Mandolin Club of fourteen 
girls and thirteen mandolins — the fourteenth 
Mandoliner played the cello. 

Glee Club is closely connected with several Sim- 
mons traditions. The annual Christmas Vesper 
Service at Saint Paul's Church in Brookline, which 
was held on December 12 this year, is among the 
loveliest traditions. Other Glee Club annuals are 
its appearances at the Baccalaureate and Commence- 
ment exercises. And the Bluettes, a glee club within 
the Glee Club, presented their song, "Club '49," 
at the Senior Prom in March. 

Then there was the vesper service at Fort Devens 
on December fifth, and the joint concerts with 
M.I.T., Worcester Tech, and Babson that dotted 
the spring. But who could neglect the simple 
Monday rehearsals in the assembly hall! Under the 
direction of Mr. Wilmer T. Bartholemew, and with 
everyone working hard, the spirit of cooperation 
makes the rehearsals just as pleasant as the concerts. 



Christmas pageant is only one of the traditions Glee Club sings at. 




Or do you paint in rhythm? 




That girl you saw leaving by the back door with 
something under her arm that measured about 22" 
by 28" was not taking the social studies maps from 
Mr. Rankin's office. She wasn't stealing the blot- 
ters out of 223, either. She was just going home 
with a commission. If you were real sharp the next 
morning you would have noticed her new poster on 
Post-R Row. 

Poster Committee is about the busiest group in 
the school, working at a sustained rate from Sep- 
tember to June, with booms but no depressions in 
its business. The chairman automatically becomes 
Censor of Creations for the Corridors, keeps the 
corridor announcements crisp and current, and 
keeps the records of who made which posters, so 
that in May members collect wages that arc pro- 
portioned according to the number and size of their 
commissions. 

There is an annual contest at the end of the year 
at which all the posters are assembled and judged, 
and Poster of the Year is chosen. The Committee's 
calendar isn't always bursting with business ap- 
pointments. There comes a pause in the year's oc- 
cupation that is known as the artist's hour, when 
the poster painters go out for their annual dutch- 
treat supper. 



Ellen Gould, Doris Katinio, and Barbara Covin paint 
posters before Ellen and Barbara place them on poster roiv. 




55 



Z5tV> 




^ on '^^'^' 




^^^ "^ veavs ago, ^^''^Seo- 

^^^\t of e^^^'''. !n Ji^^^^^'^, ° a tout 

"notrooi-%c:--sV 

page- ^^" tngvapl^is, ai» ^itovial v 

-TorsS«-ts--^^^°^v 

WQ "^^ • \ vevUsements^ ;vvtoTma\. '^^ ^eavs, a 
h'^-— -^ \ CoB^P^-^fJ/lo.e.n °V'°,iUngBV^^,- 
i-—-"^ n^et.ec\v\ >- ^g ftvst . gossiP? ^ ' (,veased. 



\ the P=P=' the year- 



the paP=' theyea""- ___- 



3{ tnes-s r 

'^'^ « of tt^e 

^•'^^^^ "fM Vno does tV.e , 

, „ with t" comP^^^ , fnv * 
^-^'" ?vS cliaivce to c^ ^age 
^'^^"^^they P^°°'''tdeandtV^'^ 
^ ■^®'' Mions are made 

s ocV.ed M^- 



^^N^O>NO -°S;^Macy^ 

Wana9>"9E ...... SV^^vUis ^eU 

Besearo^, • • .....••■ ■;^^ tAaCvae 

Associates . • Jeau ^^^^^^^ 



° ts ot ^-^'^ n.e idea 

. *v,P. napei _ ,.„v Nev'" _^„* ad- 



C-.rcuUt.on .... Joc JV^,at)Otta \\ \^^,ects. ^ 



Our Mic began with forty . . . A 



Innocent as only new staffs can be, the staff of 
Mic '49 discovered last May that theit book was 
the fortieth volume of a series started in 1909, just 
ten years after the college was founded and only 
three years after the first class graduated from Sim- 
mons. From that day on, more time was spent on 
research into the history of the College, its schools, 
clubs and activities than perhaps any other single 
phase of its production. 

In the fall, after the initial planning and theme 
had been decided on and the layouts made, the girls 
in the Editor's Room discovered that they had 
more than a tradition of forty years to live up to, 
for the 1948 edition of Microcosm had been award- 
ed the All-America rating in national competition, 



the highest award possible for a yearbook to receive 
in the country. 

The literary staff under the direction of Helen 
Ryan immediately set to reading all possible ac- 
counts on the background and development of 
Simmons and found enough interesting sidelights 
on the College to more than fill one yearbook. At 
one time a course was given in landscaping, and 
radios and victrolas weren't allowed in the dorms. 
Chaperones were required on all dates and Student 
Government members couldn't smoke. But even 
as times have changed, so has our Mic. And in this 
fortieth volume of Mic we hope to tell of them. 

Not only were the editorial researchers busy but 
the photographic staff was on the lookout for any 
old pictures that might be of use in picturing the 
College as it once was. 

Picas, points, and proofreader's symbols had 
Marjorie JoUes busy for months. But not all the 
work was editorial and Muriel Franz as business 
manager spent her most worried hours keeping Mic 
in the black. To compensate for this the editor tried 
for months to find a red that was blue enough to 
match her favorite lipstick. Of course all the staff 




Mr. Valx. ivho aids and abets and staff mem- 
bers Jones, Labovitz., DelVecchio and Jolles 
comment, criticixe, and — work. 



page from our bool 



was confident that anyone would want 
a copy of this anniversary book, but it 
was Jean Erickson who had the prob- 
lem of selling, sight unseen, this latest 
volume of Microcosm. 

Towards January, it was possible to 
find technical advisor, Mr. Dino Valz, 
and the editor in the office almost any 
night of the week cropping pictures 
until midnight. The pace kept up 
through February and by the time prac- 
tice work rolled around the whole staff 
was ready to go to Florida for a month. 
But even then nights were spent back at 
Simmons after a hard day at the office and page 
proofs were read and corrected and heads and cap- 
tions had to be written. 

Looking back on the year we think of our dance, 
the first all-college formal of the year and the king 
we crowned at the Somerset. We had numerous 
coffee hours during the year for the staff and to 
introduce the underclassmen who would take over 
Mic '50. And finally in May we announced our new 
staff and saw our new book for the first time at the 
annual banquet. 




Terry Benson, the ed, spent as many nights as days with 
Which shall ive save and which shall we selU 
Our own Boz, bursts with pride. 



Mic. 




Simmons religious dubs promote tolerance 



The Greek Orthodox Club at Simmons was 
formed in March, 1947, and received its charter in 
October, 1948. The first president, Yvonne Hansley, 
organized the club in response to a growing desire 
of many students for knowledge of the Orthodox 
faith and to bring the different nationalities of the 
faith closer together, intellectually and socially. 
Speakers have been chosen with this purpose in 
mind, and the club considers that its attempt has 
been highly successful. Noted Orthodox clergymen 
have been its guests. One of the highlights of the 
club's history was a lecture with slides by Presi- 
dent Conant of Harvard on great Orthodox 
churches of the Near East. President Conant's lec- 
ture was held as an open meeting, and the increas- 
ing interest in the club's activities was shown by 
the fact that sixty students w^ere present. Only six 
attended the first meeting in 1947. 

At County Fair last year the club's booth of 
pastries of the Near East was one of the busiest, 
and this year there have been several open meetings 
with speakers on the Orthodox religion. The club 
strengthens intercollegiate ties by joint meetings 
with Orthodox clubs from other colleges. 



Hillel is one of the younger clubs here and it 
has all the vitality of its youth with some to spare. 
Six years ago a Hillel Foundation was established 
at Simmons to serve the Jewish community within 
the college religiously, educationally, culturally, 
and socially. Now Hillel is one of the few clubs to 
have weekly meetings and to publish its own news- 
paper on the campus. 

This year Rabbi Helman had held informative 
and worthwhile classes every Thursday in 314. 
Members considered Conversational Hebrew, Psy- 
choanalysis of Religion, Jewish history, and the 
Role of the Jewish Women in the Home. Tuesday 
is another Hillel day at school when the choral 
group meets in the assembly hall with Professor 
Braslavsly, to prepare for joint concerts with Har- 
vard and M.I.T. 

The club started off socially this year in October 
with the Bridge and Potato Pancake Party in the 
cafeteria, and four days later the Cotton Ball at 
Southern House, Brookline. Highlighting the 
winter meetings was Mr. Sypher's "The World Is a 
Wedding," and analysis of the short stories of 
Delmor Schwartz. 




Phyllis Hellman, Harriet 
Labovitx,, Esther Glazer, 
Virginia Marcus, and 
Arlene Letvis of Hillel. 



60 



and friendship among all creeds. 




Officers in the kitchen: Neivman' s Mary Donahue, 
Phyllis hamere, Muriel Ferris, and Joan Glasby. 



Officers in the corridor: Christian Science' s Shirley Gavin, 
Virginia Willon, Elain Gavin, and Lucille Blaha. 



Newman Club was first again this year in the 
membership lineup. One hundred and fifty-six New- 
manites kept their calendars crow^ded with Federa- 
tion as well as College facilities at their disposal. 
Simmons' Newman Club is one of the more than 
350 chapters of the National Federation of Newman 
Clubs, and since 1945, when a Newman Center was 
opened in Boston, inter-college teas, dances, con- 
ferences, and outings have flourished. 

This year Newman Club's chaplain has been 
Father Henry C. Fisher. Father Fisher gave a series 
of lectures on the mass, and on "Marriage — A 
Job," in addition to his advisory duties. Several 
members attended the New England Federation 
conference at the University of New Hampshire in 
the Fall, after the October barn dance, sponsored by 
Newman Vues. 

Among the major events of the year were the 
lectures at Symphony Hall by Monsignor Fulton J. 
Sheen, professor of philosophy at Catholic Uni- 
versity. Newman Club members flocked to the 
annual Cenacle retreat, and another lovely tradition 
was the Mother and Daughter Communion Breakfast 
on the first Sunday in May, at which the new 
ofiicers were installed. 



The Christian Science Organization is one of the 
oldest at Simmons, its by-laws dating from 1912. 

The organization holds informal weekly meet- 
ings, which prove helpful and inspiring to the mem- 
bers; president Shirley Gavin refers to the weekly 
meetings as an oasis — testimony to only one of the 
several refreshing aspects of the club. 

This year the special events of the year included 
the annual reception for new members; a joint 
meeting with the Christian Science organization of 
near-by colleges; and the lecture in the spring by a 
board member of the Lectureship of the First 
Church of Christ, Scientist. At this lecture last year 
the club was host to Lord and Lady Astor. 



Sacco, Vanzetti to Die, 
Condemned for Murder 

$500,000 Given to Prince 



61 



Y and Outing, two of the most popular dubs; 




Carol Hahn, Connie Mattioli, Marge Clock, Helen BeleXps 



YWCA 

This year Y.W.C.A. has added another record to 
its collection by being the second largest club at 
Simmons, with 104 members. During the war years 
Y's calendar was crowded with volunteer and relief 
works, conferences, with panels on anti-Semitism 
as It is manifested on campuses and other serious 
problems, with outstanding guest speakers, and 
joint sponsorship with other clubs of drives. 

Greater understanding of religions has been one 
of the major purposes of Y.W.C.A. It has sponsored 
series of lectures by noted men and women of sev- 
eral religions. 

This year the scope of activity has been main- 
tained by President Helen Belezos. "European 
Student Life and Its Needs" was the problem dis- 
cussed by Miss Gerda Lewis and Miss Anna Modig- 
liani at an open meeting. Several Y members at- 
tended the New England Churchmanship Confer- 
ence in December. Each year members give a Christ- 
mas party for a settlement house; this year, in addi- 
tion to the traditional Christmas Music Hour, Y 
gave its party for the Old People's Home in Rox- 
bury. Members were also very active in assisting 
with Stu-G's toy drive, and the distribution of 
these toys to European relief agencies. 



OUTING 

In the spring of 1940 six Simmons girls went on 
an outing to Mt. Monadnock which hatched a 
new idea for Simmons. The trip was fun. It got the 
girls out in the open, a real change for classroom- 
bound college girls. There were lots of girls back 
at school who only breathed fresh air from the Fen- 
way to Brookline or Huntington Avenue, and exer- 
cised by running from 325 to 152a between classes. 

And so a group got together, christened them- 
selves the Outing Club, and held their first meeting 
on November 12, 1940. Those monthly meetings 
have been going on every fall, winter, and spring 
since. Hiking, biking, skiing, and swimming, ice- 
skating, rock climbing, and square dancing "take 
the floor' ' in the lounge whether by movies, colored 
slides, or guest speakers. 

Then the Outing Club, no theoretical group, goes 
out and tries all of them. Activities this year 
started off in October when the club canoed down 
the Sudbury River, with men from the University 
of Massachusetts paddling. After the annual Blue 
Hills Circus, the club was off to Jaffrey for a week- 
end trip to Birchtoff Lodge with Harvard, Devens 
and Tech. A week later, the girls said thank you 
with a square dance. 



62 



AMELIA EARHART * WENDELL WILLKIE • PABLO PICASSO 



PCA and IV CF, two of the most active. 



PCA 

The Simmons Progressive Citizens of America 
was formed in the fall of 1947 by Mona Lipofsky 
and other students in response to the growing pro- 
gressive movement at the college, and as a parallel 
to the progressive parties that were being organ- 
ized at the time. Student Government granted its 
charter in the spring. 

Its members were very active during the presi- 
dential campaign, canvassing to get progressive 
candidates on the ballots, and attending political 
rallies. PCA scheduled speakers for open meetings 
at the college to present the liberal platform to the 
student body. The club stimulated discussion and 
thought on foreign policy, the United Nations, 
and other issues of national concern. 

This year even more emphasis is being placed on 
vital national and international trends. A series 
of PCA forums was presented during noon hours 
and led by the club members. These hours included 
talks on the United Nation's structure and veto, a 
song fest, movies, student-faculty discussions, and 
talks by foreign students. In addition to these dis- 
cussions there were regular afternoon meetings. 



IVCF 

In 1944, a merger of the Unity Club and the 
League of Evangelical Students into a chapter of 
the national organization of Intervarsity Christian 
Fellow^ship resolved the question of unifying the 
small yet very important denominational clubs 
into one large working force. IVCF is a fundamen- 
talist group that uses its daily prayer meetings and 
Bible study classes as a basis for discussion of the 
application of Christian philosophy to daily life. 

During these past five years the club has worked 
on local, national, and international levels. In 
addition to intercollege Bible conferences, guest 
speakers at monthly meetings have been foreign 
missionaries, students from Gordon and other 
divinity schools, C. Stacy Woods, international 
chairman of IVCF, and last winter Dr. F. Kiss, pro- 
fessor at the University of Budapest, spoke to Sim- 
mons IVCF. 




Wattenmaker, Labovitz., 
Lincoln, Lifofsky Kyriacopoutos 




Gallupp, Nelson, Ladd 



63 



GEORGE SANTAYANA • CARL GUSTAV JUNG • JOHN L LEWIS 



Our all-college baby is now two . 



Seniors in the English school are responsible 
for putting the Review out and it takes a lot 
of time. Here Mary Giori and Esther Maletx, 
start in on the first draft of ivhat you read in 
your copy. 




Paste-up is fun, but ivhat if the story doesn't fit, someone 

doesn t know how to use a pica rule. But there are always scissors 

and plenty of rubber cement around as Bond, Craig, and Super- 

natilt experiment. 



Taylor and Giori check those galleys for names and facts. 
One of the most tedious but most important steps in pre- 
paring the Review for publication. 




64 



and ifs growing all the time. 




A last-minute check or a last-mirmte scoop, could he 

either, but Ferris and Jolles are taking no chances. The 

jobs are many and the hours long, but tve all say with 

pride, "Look ivhat 1 did." 




The genial D. Williams, Editor, talks it over with her 
chief conspirator, R. F. Boztvorth. Responsible for the 
smooth operation of the Review staffs and its publica- 
tion, there is always time for a joke, shaggy dog prefer- 
ably. 



Wall Street Stunned 
Market Sure to Recover 

.New Wing to Have Lounge 



65 




Esther M.aletx. and Shirley Nei^er who have guided the 
NSA committee through one of its most -profitable years . 



The largest and most representative organization 
of college students in America is the National 
Students Association, of which Simmons has been 
a part since its inception in 1947. The vote polled 
on "Shall Simmons join the NSA?" was 906, the 
largest student vote in the history of Simmons. 
Simmons has sent representatives to all NSA meet- 
ings and conferences, and has carried out NSA ac- 
tivities on campus through the Simmons NSA 
committee, a subcommittee of Student Government. 

The chairman of NSA, an ex-officio member of 
Stu-G, and the vice-chairman, are all-college elected 
and are Simmons's official representatives to the 
annual NSA convention in Wisconsin. Other 
members of the NSA committee are neither elected 
nor appointed; in line with NSA's democratic aim 
of including all interested students in its activities, 
members of the committee are students who volun- 
teer to work on its various projects. 

NSA activity this year has been widespread and 
varied. Through local and national groups it has 
done its best to increase international understand- 
ing and friendship by conducting an orientation 
program for foreign students. Under this program 
each incoming foreign student has an American 



NSA, our latest 



"sister" who introduces her to American life. 
During International Students' Week, November 
11-17, NSA conducted a book drive to aid the 
University of Berlin — and collected over seven 
hundred books! It sponsored International Food 
Fair of foreign pastries, and a Fiesta, at which 
foreign students sang and danced, and at which 
Robert West of Yale, International Vice-President, 
emphasized the vital importance of planning for 
the future that will come out of the festivals and 
work of NSA. 

Learning of the plight of students in DP camps 
in Europe, the NSA committee undertook, as a 
major project, to bring to this country from three 
to five DP students to study at Simmons next year. 
After the Corporation waived tuition charges, a 
goal of $3500 was set to meet the living expenses 
of the students. This money was raised by student 
donations and by soliciting gifts from interested 
individuals outside the college. 

NSA has outlined a series of low-cost student 
tours to Europe and the Americas; many Simmons 
students plan to travel and study this summer in 
Canada, Europe, and South America, in terms of 
this series. Coming closer to home, NSA tackled 
the problem of the high student cost-of-living. 
Simmons participated in the Purchase Card Plan, 
under which several Boston merchants joined with 
merchants in every section of the country to give 
from ten to twenty-five percent discounts to stu- 
dents holding NSA Purchase Cards. 

Several Simmons students attended the Human 
Relations Institute sponsored by NSA at Boston 
University on March 12 and 13. Listening to well- 
known educators and taking part in discussion 
groups they became increasingly concerned with 
what higher education is and what it should be. 

Each year NSA has extended its scope of activ- 
ities, which affect every student on almost every 
campus in the country. It has made students more 
aware of the student problems within their own 
and other colleges. It has attacked religious and 
racial discrimination and infringements upon aca- 
demic freedom. It has worked for better student 
governments and independent campus publications. 
It has worked and will continue to work for a 
better life for students everywhere. 



66 



WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE • JOHN GALSWORTHY * JAN MASARYK 



democratic achievement. 



Kay Bernard, head of the foreign students committee, 
meets ivtth one of her "sisters." 



Typifying the welco7ne of the foreign students at Simmons. 
Shirley Neixer greets a few of the newcomers to the U.S 




67 



DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER * GABRIEL MISTRAL * T. S. ELIOT 




/ 



Greasepaint 



Annually the Christmas pageant presents one of 
the loveliest traditions of the College. Mary is 
portrayed by the Most Beautiful Senior. Joseph, 
the shepherds, angels, and Wise Men are club mem- 
bers. There is a choral effect of the carols and the 
Nativity passages read from the Bible that frames 
the simplicity and beauty of these Christmas tra- 
ditions. 

Spring Production, 1949, was Edna Ferber and 
George S. Kaufman's Stage Door, directed by Myl- 
dred Foley Trempf, and presented at the Boston 
Conservatory of Music on April 22. The cast was 
an all-college one, including Barbara Carney, Joan 
Corwin, Lorelei Bird, Joan Reynolds, Nell Segal, 
Shirley Garner, Patricia McDermott, Teresa No- 
wak, Janine Marjollet, Patricia Walsh, Sally Mc- 
Carthy, Elizabeth Griffiths, Sally Roche, Joanna 



You have five minutes . 



Don't underestimate these actors of conviction. 
College may be a full-time career for most, but it 
is never so full for the Dramatic Club's Bankheads, 
Bergmans, and Birds, as when they are accepting 
Compet's silver cup and directing Spring Produc- 
tion. 

Beginning as a flurry of dramatic enthusiasm in 
1916 the club survived temperament. Tempests, and 
its hours of glory that included Eddie Dowling as 
the Club's guest in 1924, when he appeared in Bos- 
ton in "Sally, Irene, and Mary"; and the success of 
its survival is proved by the traditions that are its 
props and property. 

Competitives is twenty-six years old this year. 
Seniors direct freshman, sophomore, and junior 
productions, which are judged at their fall presen- 
tation by a faculty committee. The cast of the 
winning play (not alivays the juniors), is presented 
with the silver cup holding American Beauty roses. 
This year White Iris was the winning play, directed 
by Lorelei Bird, president of the Dramatic Club, 
and Margaret Longley; the cast presented Jean 
Hirsch, Lillian Ladd, Janine Marjollet, and Teresa 
Nowak. 




The cue is. 



68 



WINSTON CHURCHILL • JAMES B. CONANT * TRYGVE LIE 



gaieties, footlight frolics. 



Greene, Josette Kaloustian, Louise Fraser, Shirley 
Kaplan. Rehearsals began after midyears and the 
tempo of those voices that echoed through the 
corridors had Mic staff — also burning the after- 
4;10 oil — guessing, until we discovered there were 
men in the house. Eight students from Boston Col- 
lege, Boston University, M.I.T., and Harvard sup- 
plemented the club's cast. 



Will I mujf my linesl 



Casts for 


Compets 


WHITE IRIS 


AMAZONS ON BROAD- 


juniors: 


WAY 


Janine MarjoUet 


Freshmen: 


Jean Hirsch 


Jeanne Brown 


Terese Novae 


Joanne Mackie 


Lillian Ladd 


Nell Seagel 




Carolyn Goodell 


WRONG NUMBER 


Joan Corwin 


Sophomores: 


Sylvia Horowitz 


Sally McCarthy 




Joan Reynolds 




Shirley Kaplan 






* 



#^-- 




There were times when 
the play seemed not enough 
to be The Thing; secret so- '"",,'' 

cieties and astronomical di- 
visions such as Sagittaricus 

and Acquittaricus, within the club threatened a 
caste system based on merits and demerits. The 
Mummers, "a secret society," was formed in 1938, 
and it awarded gold keys to members whose acting 
or stage craft was outstanding. Now, with the 
elimination of such gestures, with sincere, hard 
work, and with enthusiastic support, the Dra- 
matic Club has mastered a temperance that cer- 
tainly gives It smoothness. 




Longely, Willon, MarjoUet, Walsh, and Anderson ivatch tvhile President 
Lorelli Bird draws up plans for the year s events. 



69 



FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT • CORDELL HULL • ENRICO FERMI 



Living in and liking it , , . 



Dorm life is often referred to as "living in," and 
the reason the phrase is no longer than two words is 
the innate discretion of all Simmons girls. But if 
you insist on asking what they live in we can not 
guarantee the resistance of that discretion. 

The trials and tears of the commuter's life end 
when she staggers up the steps of her home, but for 
the dorm student the evening is still in pigtails. 
After first or second supper she rushes back to her 
room, takes out her ring of keys, and opens the 
padlocks on her closet door, her drawers, and her 
pack of cigarettes. Everything is empty because 
someone has a passkey, so she leaves the bare cup- 
boards, begins at her end of the house, works to- 
ward Brookline Ave., and by 10:30 she has shirt, 
blue jeans, gym pumps, butts, twenty cents, and 
can go to Johnson's for coffee, the long way over. 
Then by 1 :30 she's ready to study but the smoker 
is closed so what can she do? She goes to bed. Life 
gets tedious, don't it. 





Behind the tree, no Santa 
On the chair, another girl 

Up on the steps'! 



singing, knitting, and bidding 





On the roof, the carolers 
1)1 the living room, three spades redoubled. 
In the game room, seconds on punch. 



Democrats Resain Power 
As Roosevelt Takes Oath 

Enslisli School Planned 



71 



Commuting with a capital C , . . 




on the run from dawn to dusk. 




Butt room bids . 

Somerset sentimental 



Ever notice, in psychology and statistics classes, that the 
most voluble students are the commuters who spend an 
average of 465 hours a year or 1840 hours in four years or 
7523 days — commuting? There follows a problem; whether 
'tis nobler for the time to cut classes and save three hours, 
or to go, and see the flags flying over Fenway Park — unless 
you have all your classes on the South Side of Simmons, 
poor kid. 

But to meet the mob objectively there are various tech- 
nics. If you're in the upper income-intellect bracket you can 
buy the N«M' Yorker and you have not only your text for 
English 11, but all your answers to the deluded world for the 
next week, beginning Thursday. Or you might knit. You 
should try, and of course you'll be standing up, knitting 
four-needle cable sox while the train takes that curve be- 
tween Central and Harvard. You meet the most fascinating 
people that way. If that curve were only between Park and 
Charles you'd have a seat for eight rapid-transit minutes. 



Boston is our Campus and we enjoy 



:^ 








every block of it. 




An antique-lover s parad, 



' State House hearing or a bit of ivindoic shopping 




Our own backyard is just as popular and 




Bell, Knox and Carney do a little honing tip at the fire- 
place. 



You could look around the bookstore for hours or spend 
them in Nirs. Gardner s at no cost. 




16 



JOSEPH STALIN • HARRY S. TRUMAN • DAVID LILLIENTHAL 



on rainy days we find recreation inside. 



Backyard step-singing has always been a favorite and the lounge is always crowded. 




The call of the open spaces 



11 



FOULKE BERNADOTTE * CLEMENT ATLEE • JAMES FORESTALL 



Fifty years of 




Early on a May mon/hig: 
Pages and posies, 

Strawberries and shortcake. 
Dancers and deiv 



78 



traditions that last from 6 a.m. to 12 p.m. 



Dr. Mark, in his book, Delayed by Fire, has said 
that in student life only four years are needed for 
an event to become a tradition. Some aspects of the 
traditions we know and take so much as matters of 
course are not much more than four years old; 
others are centuries old. No one could date the be- 
ginning of group singing and of college songs. And 
on the warm evenings in the fall and spring when 
Simmons girls gather for step-singing no one cares 
to date the beginning of this favorite tradition. The 
Seniors are on the step of honor until Class Day in 
June, when they move aside on the colonnade and 
give their places to the Juniors. 

Compets began in 1924 and for twenty-five years 
have been the dramatic focus of late fall. Seniors 
are the directors and mentors of Freshman, Sopho- 
more, and Junior productions. The faculty board of 
judges awards the cast of the winning play a silver 
cup of red roses. Later in December Christmas 
Vesper Services are held, these annual services were 
held for the College's first Christmas and are still 
among the loveliest of Simmons traditions. 

Then there are the Christmas parties held in the 
lounge for the children of nearby settlement houses, 
the children of the faculty and staff, and among the 




A Christmas formal 
A Senior Luncheon 
An Olde English Dinner 




79 




Indoors or out, ifs all 



clubs. In 1914 Olde English Dinner was first planned 
for the Christmas festivities. The costume and cus- 
tom of 16th century English manor life are adopted 
for the evening. In the candlelighted hall, the Lord 
and Lady of the Manor are seated with their court 
at the head table and their guests, in formal dress, 
are entertained by minstrels and jesters. After the 
court pages carry into the hall the flaming boar's 
head, the Lord of the Manor calls for the troupe of 
strolling players to present legends of King Arthur's 
Court. In the candlelight, with frosted windows 
and fir and holly boughs to deck the hall, while 
carols are sung and medieval customs are manifest, 
the unique custom of Olde English Dinner is real- 
ized as the most festive tradition of the year. 

Proms are a tradition, though here again a tradi- 
tion that is an expected part of the social year and 
regarded as a matter of course. In addition to the 
class proms. Microcosm, Stu-G, and Neivs sponsor 
dances in turn in the fall, winter, and spring. An- 
other spring tradition is Sophomore Luncheon at 
which the students receive their class rings. 

May Day was first celebrated at Simmons in 1912 
with the May Pole dance, strawberry shortcake for 
breakfast, and tree planting, which makes 1949's 
May Day festivities several years older than the 

Mauled Mac, making merry . 



t Xt 



Hobo Hanson, hitting the. . .1 
Batting Beatley, a long one over the fence. 



80 




in fun . . . and fun we have. 



participants. Rain or shine, May Day is a beautiful 
tradition for a beautiful season. 

Boston Symphony and Pops concerts are favorites 
among Simmons students and faculty, and when 
everyone gets together one spring night and makes 
it Simmons Night at the Pops, it is another good 
example of what traditions are made of. 

The first Student Government May Party was 
held in 1910 after class and club elections. May 
Party is still one of excitement and congratulations, 
when election results are announced and the new 
officers receive their spring flower corsages. More 
spring flowers come into the fore in June when the 
Juniors hunt through fields and meadows for 
daisies to weave into the Commencement Daisy 
Chain. 

And these are Simmons traditions, all ages, for 
all seasons, for every purpose from welcoming 
Freshmen in September to serenading the Seniors in 
June. All that is needed is an idea, four years, and 
the ever-present enthusiasm of students to perpetu- 
ate as traditions some of the loveliest events of 
college life. 



r*-— ~ 




Taint fair, he batted that one, too. 
But after all he is president. 



81 




ometime during the summer before a freshman enters Simmons, she receives a 
copy of her freshman bible. As she reads through the little blue and white book 
she finds a wealth of information concerning Simmons, its traditions, activities, 
classes, and also a few rules. But the rules are not many and the freshman looks 
forward to the day when she will be welcomed by the Junior Welcoming Committee, 
her Junior Sister, and the upper classmen at Simmons. One of the first 
elections that freshmen participate in is the voting for Student Government 
representatives. Then come a few of the more personal items that each 
girl will remember long after she leaves the College. Each class has a mascot 
that follows it through the four years in Simmons and forever after graduation. 
The mascot becomes a symbol for each class and at all the all-College 
competitions and contests each mascot receives the prize or ribbon denoitng its 
class's place and honor. The class president carries the mascot at step- 
singing and finally at the end of four years the mascot is presented 
to the class baby. But small felt replicas can be found in almost any girl's 
room and birthday cards with a picture of a Dopey, an elephant, a fawn, or 
a penguin are prized pieces of mail to any Simmons underclassman or grad. 




After forty years and after four, a caf and gown is still 
the same. 



■0 3r, 



^^ 



^BIp' 




jpSW-^SmJ*** 



>^ ■ aX 



""""""Hi 



'^ 



A 



^^^*t«~*«3ip^ 



./ 



j/eMd-iMi 



jH nwAcat^ 



Freshmen frolic and have more fun than 




Elsa Thorgerson, Mary Luce, Dottte Hesse 
Joan CI ashy . 

Waldo Palmer and Joshua went 
hand in hoof to the Freshman 
Formal in April, marvelling at the 
lovely order that had come of the 
Orientation Week chaos. They ate 
their bowl of cherries, Joshua get- 
ting all the pits — "Froin what 
does the cherry tree come, Joshua?" 

That first week was really cha- 
otic. Everyone knew what was go- 
ing on except the Freshmen, for 
whom everything was going on. 
But the Juniors salvaged their 
sanity, and the faculty reception 
was too impressive and too friendly 
to be bewildering. The Sopho- 
mores' Bib Party in October gave 
them the last laugh at their fresh- 
manitis in the skit that was so pre- 
cise a caricature, and Carolyn 
Sonniksen won the bib contest 
with the most autographs. 

The first Freshman election came 
in November, when Jo Johnson 
and Ann DeVoe were elected fresh- 
man representatives to Stu-G. The 
nextvotingresulted in class officers: 
Mary Luce, president; Elsa Thor- 
gerson, vice-president; Dorothy 



Hesse, secretary; Jean Connolly, 
treasurer; Joan Corwin and Joan 
Barnes, dorm and commuter rep- 
resentatives to Social Activities 
Committee. 

At Compets the Freshmen pre- 
sented "Amazons on Broadway." 
Mr. Palmer hid under Joshua dur- 
ing that one. Women gangsters 
might not be too frightening under 
normal circumstances, but when 
you've just given them an hour 
exam they probably don't care if 
the gun is loaded. 

Cherry and white and the Valen- 
tine party, May Day baskets and 
white roses and strawberry short- 
cake — perhaps the Freshmen were 
being more than artistic when they 
chose their class colors. They have 
shown some pretty efficient action 
in other areas too. Jo Johnson was 
co-chairman of the production of 
"H.M.S. Pinafore"; Dottie Hesse 
received a special award for her 
work on News; Rita Sue King was 
elected second-semester secretary 
of NSA; several Freshmen modelled 
at the intercollegiate fashion show 
in the Fall. 

As they watched the April formal 
Joshua conceded the bowl of cher- 
ries to Mr. Palmer in exchange for 
the white rose in Mr. Palmer's but- 
ton-hole, and Mr. Palmer remarked 
that in spite of Joshua, advising 
this class was going to be "fawn." 

The juniors show hoiv. 



Adams, Sarah F. 

W. Maine Sanatorium, Greenwood Mc, Maine 
Alexander, Jean M. 

490 Lake Ave., Bridgeport 5, Conn. 
Alley, Dorothy E. 

Aquidnecl; Park Cottage, Spring, Newport, R. I. 
Ambrose, Frances A, 

15 Chase, Dorchestet 25 
.Anderson, Heiene A. 

47 Round Hill, Jamaica Plain 30 
Anderson, Lillian M. -'" 

614 Willard, Quincy 69 
Annable, Ruth E. 

20 Naples Rd.,Salera 
-'Kpel, Marjorie E, 

24Selwyn Rd., Belmont 78 
Appel, Joyce A. 

47 Shelfield Rd., Meltose 76 
Ausenda, Isabella 

87 Corso Magenta, Milano, Italy 
■■Vyer, Annabel 

257 Tremont St., S. Braintree 85 
Ball, Lois E- 

10 Wilde Rd., Wellcsley 81 
Barnes, Joan 

398 Wolcott Pk., Auburndale 66 
Barnetr, Elaine H. 

104 N. Welles Ave., Kingston, Pa. 
Bayer, Eleanor M. 

R.F.D. 1, Bos 115, Kingston, N. Y. 
Beckhard, Janice 

14 Holmes Dale, Albany 3, N. Y. 
Bedell, Mary A. 

56 Burlington Ave., Wilmington 
Bellow, Beulah M. 

204 Maple, New Bedford 
Black, Jane C. 

6 Washington Ave., Andover 
Bloom, Janet T. 

708 George, New Haven, Conn. 
Bogle, Jane L 

44 Fairview Ter., White River Junction, Vr. 
Bonner, Mary E. 

2238 Charlestown Ave., Toledo 12, Ohio 
Boyce, Betty A. 

Old Sudbury Rd., S. Lincoln 
Braidy, Charlorte R. 

138 Bitch, Bangor, Maine 
Brewer, Sue E. 

21 Allegheny Ave., Townson 4, Md. 
Brooks, Geraldine E. 

Fairview Village, Montgomery County, Pa. 
Brown, Betty L. 

102 S. Main, Barre, Vt. 
Brown, Jeanne L. 

296 Bradley Ave., Meriden, Conn. 
Brown, Sylvia A. 

71 Locust, Danvets 



The freshmen listen. 




84 



anybody! 



Bruce, Sylvia J. 

93 Lowden Ave., Somerville 44 
Bruneau, Margarec L. 

87 Adams, Waltham 54 
Biirgarella, Jean F. 

4 Webster, Gloucester 
Burke, Helen M. 

137 Savin Hill Ave., Boston 25 
Butterfield, Jeanecte 

60 Washington, Middiebury, Vt. 
Caine, Sybil A. 

192 Church, Holliston 
Chateauneuf, Shirley M, 

9 Linron Ave., Methuen 
Cicia, Alba C, 

10 Packard Ave., Somerville 44 
Clark, Judith 

2024 Orrington Ave., Evanston, III. 
Clawson, )ane O. 

127 Balitown Rd.. Schenectady 8, N. Y. 
Cleveland, Edith F. 

23 Balivar, Canton 
Clifford, Helena S. 

205 N. Franklin, Holbrook 
Cogan, Eleanor M. 

25 Portina Rd., Brighton 35 
Cole, Anne H. 

6412 Murray Hill Rd., Baltimore 12. Md. 
Colmont, Yvonne M. 

R.F.D. 1, Scott Hill Rd., Woonsocket, R. 1. 
Comick, Doris T. 

50 Wilmot, Wacertown 72 
Condon, Maryrose M. 

119 Emerald. Medford 55 
Connolly, Joan T. 

18 Sheridan, N. Easton 
Constas, Catherine E. 

65 St. Gregory, Dorchester 24 
Corwin.JoanM. 

26 Hillside Ave., Valhalla, N. Y. 
Crawford, Elinor A. 

378 W. Columbia, Cohoes, N. Y. 
Crawford, Margaret B. 

5 ElmhurstRd.. Baltimore 10, Md. 
Crawford, Marilynn E. 

18 Concord, Needham 94 
Crocker. Martha E. 

Main St., Btewster 
Cronin, Elizabeth A. 

101 Hale, Beverly 
Cronin, Jean L, 

206 Washington Ave., Winthrop 52 
Cronin. Patricia M. 

142 Main, Leominster 
Crutchley, Florence G. 

140 Washington, E. Holliston 
Curran. Joan A. 

136 Elmer Rd., Dorchester 22 



Notbhig like a little phys ed. 





Bibsy hilt no bottles 



Custin, Joan V. 

162 Payson Rd., Brookline 67 
David, Anne D. 

70 Howard , Reading 
Davis, Clare J. 

168 Gerry Rd., Brookline 46 
DeStefano, Norma M. 

36 W. Eagle. E. Boston 28 
DeThomas, Dolotes M. 
19 Monica. Taunton 
DeVoe, Ann M. 

Scar HillRd..Boylston 
DiMauro, Ann J. 

Spruce Ter., Portland, Conn. 
Dirsa, Arlene J. 

51 Providence, Worcester 4 
DiRusso, Jeanette 

10 Bedford, Somerville 43 
Donaehue, PaulineJ. 

33 Melville Ave., Dorchester 24 
Downing, Verian A. 

Cumberland Center, Maine 
Draper, Jane A. 

27 Bartlet, Andover 
Draper, Joan F. 

27 Bartlet, Andover 
Driver, Janer B. 

247 Seneca PI., Westtield, N. J. 
Echlin, Margaret J. 

54 Cleveland Rd., New Haven 15, Conn. 
Ehrlich, Nadia 

175 Hancock, Cambridge 39 
Elliot, Nancy 

297 Main, Sanford, Maine 
Emery, Elizabeth J. 

80 Summer, Cohasset 
Estry, Ellen J. 

984 Parkside Ave., Buffalo 16, N. Y. 
Fantasia, Theresa N. 

392 McGrath Hway., Sometville 43 
Ferguson, Vitginia D. 

80 Morgantown. Uniontown, Pa. 
Fields, Betty-Jane 

2 Elmwood Dr., E. Greenhush, N. Y. 
Finger, Janice 

285 Beech Spring Rd., S. Orange, N.J. 
Flaxman, Marion M. 

10 Edgar Ct., Somerville 45 
Fleischner, Suzanne 

122 Sewall Ave., Brookline 46 
Freed, Pearl R. 

97 Ledgewood Rd., W. Hartford, Conn. 
Freitas, Maria T. 

322 Mina. New Bedford 
Galben, Fay A. 
9 Coiborne, Brighton 35 



Galvagna, Marie A. 

213 Massachusetts Ave., N. Andover 
Gamans, Margaret L. 

S. Main St., Topsfield 
Garber. Lila S. 

35 Woodford. Worcester 4 
Garrett. Carolyn M. 

185 Edward Ct., W. Hempstead, N. \'. 
Gasberri, Sylvia L. 

616 Pleasant, Leominster 




85 




A round of get-acquainted 



Geeraert, Dolores C. 

60 Miicon, Lawrence 
Gilden, Beatrice 

90 Ruggles, Providence 8, R. I. 
Giickman, Judith E. 

95 Deering Rd., Martapan 26 
Glvnn, Phyllis T. 

69 Gulliver, Milton 86 
Goldberg, Thelma D. 

93 Ovethill Rd., Providence 6, R. I. 
Goodell, Carolvn 

R.F.D. l.Keene. N. H. 
Goren, Elane S- 

4 Esmond, Dorchester 24 
Gould, Luctetia 

70 Phillips Rd., Holden 
Gove, Mary L, 

26 Green, Newbury 
Graffeo, Grace C. 

25 College Ave., Medford 55 
Guillow,Joan B. 

500 Patk Dr., Boston 15 
Haberman, Elaine L. 

33 Hadwen Lane, Worcester 2 
Halperin, Pearl Z. 

60 Melvin Ave., Lynn 
Hardy, Cynthia 

3 Benevolent, Providence 6, R. I. 
Harrington, Mary E. 

892 Main. Holden 
Harris, Joan 

30 Allen Rd., Winchester 
Haugaard, Inga N. 

31 Austin, Portland 5, Maine 
Hax, Carolyn L. 

24 Herschel Ave., Waterbury 29, Conn. 
Heffernan. Sybil B. 

126 Richmond Ave., Worcester 2 
Herman, Adele J. 

4 FitzRd.,Peabody 
Hermanson, Barbara E. 

153 Strathmore Rd., Brighton 35 
Herpy, Ann 

King St., Littleton 
Hershfield, Sylvia V. 

21 Hallenan Ave., Lawrence 
Hesse, Dorothea A. 

712 Bennett, Greenville, S. C. 
Hill, Elizabeth B. 

Deer Isle, Maine 
Hinckley, Marjorie M. 

102 Abbott Rd., Wellesley Hills 82 
Hippler, Betty L. 

22 Wyllys Ave., Middletown, Conn. 
Hood, Virginia L. 

103 Burlington Ave.. Wilmington 
Hopkins, Lucy J. 

Or leans 
Horgan, Anne M. 
17 Garden, Auburn 



Horowitz, Sylvia E. 

10 W. 96ih, New York 25, N. Y. 
Houlihan, Janet M. 

14 Martiand Ave,, Brockton 38 
Howayeck, Doris L. 

236 Eastern Ave., Fall River 
Hultin, Joan H. 

25 Gothland, Quincy 69 
Hvmans, Rosamond F. 

39 Carmel, Chelsea 50 
Ingalls, Jean A. 

14 Lafayette Ct., Greenwich 4, Conn. 
Ivusic, Elaine 

420 Massachusetts Ave., Lexington 73 
Jackson, Geraldine M. 

343 Walden, Cambridge 38 
Jamiolkowski, Geraldine 

Forest Glen, New Paltz, N, Y. 
Johnson, Ingrid N. 

5 Swains Pond Ave., Melrose 76 
Johnson, Joyce 

Main St., E, Douglas 
Jones, Elaine F. 

1550 Cleveland Ave., Wyomissing, Pa. 
Jones, Phyllis C. 

28 Winsjow, Gardner 
Jordan, GerrI F. 

565 Alda Rd., Mamaroneck, N. Y. 
Kaitz, Joan M. 

10 Warren Ave., Chelsea 50 
JCaloustlan, Josette J. 

2 Spear, Melrose 76 
Kantor, Eleanor R. 

196 Nighbert Ave., Logan, W. Va. 
Kelleher.^Doris R. 

21 Payton Ct., Brockton 36 
Kelley, Phyllis A. 

8 Marbury Ter., Jamaica Plain 30 
Kelsey, Gloria M. 

225 E. Main, N. Adams 
Kerr, Marion E. 

348 Payson Rd., Belmont 78 
Kerstetter, Lucille 

Liverpool, Pa. 
Kharibian, Gloria D. 

7 Mendelssohn. Roslindale 31 
Kibler, Mary C. 

1401 Beacon, Brookline 46 
Kilby, CarolJ. 

2239 N. Quincv, Arlington, Va. 
King. Rita S. 

480 E. 29 th, Paterson 4, N.J. 
Knight, Treva L. 

15 Allen Ave.. Waban 68 
Kobritz. Jane L. 

61 Seymour. Plttsheld 
Laben, Sandra L. 

65 Homestead, Roxburv 21 
Langenfeld. Lorraine A. 

24 Cherry Lane. Chatham. N- J. 
Leibowiiz, Elaine H. 

8 Nazing Ct., Roxburv 21 
Leimbach. Sarah L. 

119 Philadelphia Ave,, Takoma Pk. 12. Md- 
LeVee. Lucille A. 

22 W, Gansevoort, Little Falls, N. Y. 
Lewis, Nancy O. 

Belleview Ave., Southingfon, Conn. 
Liker. Bernice B. 

113 Brunswick. Roxburv 21 
Locklln, Nancv E, 

21 South, Lvndonvllle, Vt. 
Lothrop. Bernice C. 

38 Grove, Boston 14 
Low, Jacquelyn 

58 Springfield, Belmont 78 
Luce, Mary E. 

39 0rmond PL, Rye, N. Y. 
Luisetti, Mane J. 

201 E. Main. Milford 
MacBeth, Edythe E. 

20 Lurton, Quincv 69 
McCabe. Barbara M, 

202 Falcon, E.Boston 28 
McCarthy, Anne M. 

444 Winthrop, Medford 55 
McClain, Althea M. 

34-36 90th, Jackson Hts., L. I , N. Y. 
McClain, Marion P. 

48 Locust, Lynn 
MacDermid, Jeanne 

■■By-the-Tides," Neptune Ave,, Madison, Conn. 



MacDonald, Bernice A. 

10421 N. W. 5th Ave., Miami. Fla. 
McEwen, Martha A. 

56 Greendale Rd., Scarsdale, N. Y. 
McGlnley. Paula 

715 Ocean Ave., New London, Conn. 
Mclntyre, Nancy E. 

190 Marlborough, Boston 16 
Mackie, Joanne R. 

18 Clyde Rd., Watertown 72 
Manchester, Claire 

10 Merrick, Ruraford 16, R. L 
March, Helen L. 

70 Concord, Nashua, N. H. 
Mawn, Mary E. 

64 Messenger ,St. Albans 3. Vt. 
Mavo, Angela E. 

87 Leyden E. Boston 28 
Melong, Mar)orie A. 

93 Ruggles, Quincy 69 
Meninskv, Hilda 

609 Allen. New Bedford 
Meyer, Claire A. 

Carman Rd., Harrington Park, N.J. 
Miller, Anne 

890 Plymouth, E. Bridgewater 
Miller, Irma R. 

50 Trident Ave., Winthrop 52 
Mirraan, Reeva C. 

701 Albany Ave., Hartford 5, Conn. 
Murdoch, Gettrude W. 

152 Weld,Ro5hndale31 
Murphy, Jean P. 

6 Stephen, Lynn 
Murphy, Marilyn T. 

56 Jackson, Rutland, Vt. 
Murphy, Maureen E. 

288 East, E. Walpole 
Nannis, Fruema A. 

931 Blue Hill Ave., Dorchester 24 
Neubauer, Ruth E. 

1583 Union. Schenectady 8, N. Y. 
Newcorab, Evelyn P. 

240 Fairmount, Hyde Park 
Newman, Marjorie A. 

25 Halifax, Jamaica Plain 3o 
Noone, Marjorie E. 

131 Moraine, Brockton 33 
Northtop, Anne 

396 Grand, Newburgh. N. Y. 
Nowick, Veronica A. 

5 Prospect, Maynard 
Nyscrom, Esther L. 

9 Morton Ter., Milton 87 



A jrosh" s first co, 



dance at Simmons^ 




86 



parties and soon they're right at home. 



O'Brien, Mary E. 

25 Rutland, Brockton 7 
O'NeilJoan E. 

73 Prospect, Wellestey Hills 8Z 
O'Neill, Irene T. 

464 Pond, Jamaica Plain 30 
Parslow, Jeanne L. 

1149 Boyd, Watertown, N. Y. 
Paulonis, Anne J. 

N. Lincoln Ave., Sayville, N. Y. 
Pearce, Lillian N. 

11 Lexington Ave., Lexington 73 
Pearson, Ruth M. 

150 Chicago, Fall River 
Pease, Virginia A. 

100 Highland, Bangor, Maine 
PeI[ey,Joan V. 

40 Ocean Ave., Lvnn 
Phillips, Marilyn G'. 

2920 2nd Ave., N., Great Falls, Mont. 
Pichetti, Regina A. 

32 Shirley, Boston 19 
Polansky, Miriam S. 

11 Hancock, Salem 
Polhemus, Bettv L. 

R.F.D.,Haydenville 
Pratt, Shirley M. 

498 S. Main, Woonsocket, R. 1. 
Price, Ruth 

25 Century, Somerville 45 
Quimby, Janet 

57 Atkins Ave., E. Lynn 
Quint, Marion N. 

76 Nelson, Dorchester 24 
Rappaport, Nancy B. 

100 Grant Ave., E. Rockaway. N. Y. 
Regalado, Pilar 

10 Prescott, Cambridge 38 
Roach, Marilyn E. 

70 Normandy Ave., Cambridge 38 
Roche, Sally A. 

850 Hamilton, Rahway, N. J. 
Rodgers, Carol J. 

11 Ashland PI., Medford 55 
Rosenbaum, Irene J. 

66 Princeton Blvd., Lowell 
Rosenfeld, Gerness A. 

59 Liberty Ave., Somerville 44 
Rosolko, Helen A. 

174 Bradford, Everett 49 
Roubicek, Ruth 

2940 10th Ave. S., Birmingham 5, Ala. 
Ruggles, Polly A. 

1708 Hutchins, Portsmouth, Oh io 



something to be re^nemhend. 




St. Pierre, Pauline A. 

Thurber Ave., Attleboro 
Sandquist, Norma M, 

163 Floral Ave.. Maiden 48 
Scannell, Barbara A. 

75 Surrey, Brighton 35 
Schlesinger, Helene R. 

486 Blue Hill Ave., Roxbury 21 
Scott, Elaine M. 

211 Bruce, Lawrence 
Sears, Ruth T. 

292 W. Main, Norwich, Conn. 
Severance, Shirley 

468 County Rd., Barnngton, R. L 
Shields, Marcia-Lee K. 

17 Park, Newton 58 
Shippee, Esther F. 

128 Wesleyan Ave., Apponaug, R. I. 
Shuize, Barbata R. 

1 Carisbrooke, Andover 
Silver Charlotte B. 

1 Grant Ave, Glens Falls, N.Y. 
Silver, Elaine E. 

17 Fellsmere Rd., Newton Centre 59 
Silverman, Cynthia F. 

512 Blue Hill Ave., Dorchester 21 
Sisson, Sylvia G. 

53 Elm, Potsdam, N. Y. 
Skinner, Carol E. 

64 Haywood, Greenfield 
Slattery, Marion E. 

1125 Massachusetts Ave., Arlington 74 
Smith, Barbara F. 

Box 528. Hopkinton, N. H. 
Smith, Joan H. 

Meadview St., Groton 
Sonniksen, Carolyn J. 

23 Walker. Manchester, Conn. 
Sorensen, Alice F. 

117 Bedford, Lexington 73 
Sorota, Zelda R. 

23 Canton, Lowell 
Spooner, Janet L. 

29 Beekman Rd., Summit, N.J. 
Stearns, Margery A. 

266 N, Main, Mansfield 
Stein, Jean M. 

19 Walthani, Maynard 
Steinberg, Carol A. 

2402 Woodmere, Cleveland Hts. 6, Ohio 
Steiner, Frances H. 

395 Riverside Dr., New York 25. N. Y. 
Stetson, Virginia L. 

102 E. State, Prssque Isle, Maine 
Stevenson, Patricia A. 

24 Windermere Ave., Arlington 74 
Stuerm, Dammar J. 

165 Pinehurst Ave,, New York 33, N. Y. 
Sullivan, Nancy A. 

9 Dartmouth, Lawrence 
Sutherland, Phyllis J. 

Shushan. N. Y. 
Taber, Patricia A. 

130 Hawthorn Rd., Braintree 84 
Taft. Eleanor 

41 Cedar Rd.. Belmont 78 
Talbot, Shirlev A. 

Bear Ridge Rd., PleasamviUe. N. Y. 
Taylor, Anita C. 

91 School. Arlington 74 
Taylor, Elizabeth A. 

44 Elm Ave.. Wollaston 70 
Thompson, Elizabeth 

17 Kahler Ave.. Milton 86 
Thorgerson, Elsa L M. 

381 Weston Rd.. Wellesley 81 
Thorpe, Grace G. 

42 Chester Ave., Medford 55 
Thunfors, Patricia B. 

76 Ben Lomond, Uniontown, Pa. 
Vanderpooi, Beverly J. 

1506 Cleveland Ave., Wyomissing, Pa. 
Varnerin, Louise M. 

321 Norfolk Ave., Boston 25 
Vogt, Doris E. 

317 W. Lincoln Ave., Rahway. N.J. 
Vogt, Dorothy E. 

4A Aberdeen Rd., Somerville 44 
von Goehde, Gretchen 

5 St. Albans Rd., Boston 15 
Wadden, Ellen V. 

19 Beacon Blvd., Peabody 



Walker, JocelynE. 

514 Gearing, Pittsburgh 10, Pa. 
Walsh. Aileen E, 

16 Chestnut, Peabody 
Walsh, Mary H. 

97 Oxford. Somerville 43 
Walsh, Ruth E. 

46 Churchill. Milton 87 
Watanabe, Hatsue S. 

475 Waiale Dr., Wailuku Maui, T. H. 
Welch, Elizabeth A. 

313 Highland Ave., Randolph 
Wells, Shirley C. 

32 Main, Rocky Hill, Conn. 
Whims, Anita M. 

1635 R.. N.W., Washington 9, D. C. 
White, Carol B. 

11 Belfry Ter., Lexington 76 
White, Carolyn M. 

33 Washington Ave., Andover 
Whittemore. Patricia J. 

Ripton, Vt- 
Wickens, jean A. 

Groton School, Groton 
Wilde, Sally A. 

13 Locust, Merrimac 
Willows, Lorraine C. 

14 Devens Rd., Swampscott 
Wishart. Peggy j- 

21 Florence Ave., Hempstead, L. L. N. Y. 
Wohrle. Nancy C. 

328 First, Pittsfield 
Wolcott. Lillian B. 

86Smull Ave, W. Caldwell, N.J. 
Wolinsky, Emma 

129 Francis, Everett 49 
Wood, Ann C. 

20 W. 6th, Lowell 
Wood, Jane E. 

29 Pine, Palmer 
Yannoni, Marghenta C. 

117 Perkins, Jamaica Plain 30 
Yannoulos, Triantafillia G. (Rose) 

50 Brock, Brighton 35 
Yardumian, Rita R. 

71 Perkins, Boston 30 
Zotos, Bessie 

19 W.Park, Brockton 49 







87 




Judy Holden, Jean Thompson, 
Prtscilla Lynn. 



Zelia Dilcaon 



The first time of doing almost 
anything is the hardest, and Boo- 
philus found it the simplest thing 
in the world to leave his cool green 
sea and silver sands and come back 
for his Sophomore year in the Fall 
— almost. Remembering his own 
bewilderment of the year before, he 
tooli many Freshmen under his fins 
and, with Mr. Grossman to iron 
out his problems, he ironed out 
theirs. 

Boophilus said right along that 
"Wrong Number" was the right 
number for the Sophomore Com- 



Sophs have learned the 



pets play, and all that saying was 
justified in December when the 
cast and the play received special 
recommendation. Just before 
Christmas vacation he flapped over 
to the old familiar Freshman dorms 
for the Soph-Frosh Christmas 
party, and after midyears at the 
Valentine Party all "The Lights 
Went Out" in the Assembly Hall. 

Soph Shuffle came in February 
and though Boophilus doesn't 
dance he shuffles as well as any 
other Sophomore. Also in Febru- 
ary several of his Sophs were ap- 
pointed to News staff at the Silver 
Anniversary Banquet. 

In March, he began looking 
around at class meetings and out 
on the back steps at this class of 
his, pondering the annual question 
the Stu-G elections always precipi- 
tate — who will we nominate this 
timenextyear? Of Boophilus' many 
virtues, doing things ahead of time 
is probably most outstanding. He 
showed up with the Juniors in the 
Spring to be measured for cap and 
gown, and until he had had a long 
talk with Mr. Grossman he had 
insisted on taking the 1950 finals 
this year — just to get them out of 
the way. 

At Soph Luncheon everybody's 
ring looked beautiful, and on May 



Day Boophilus had a great time 
waking up the Seniors with his wet 
fish. In spite of him the straw- 
berries were delicious, and the next 
time he comes to May Breakfast, 
in his senior year, it will be even 
easier to enjoy. 

BUSINESS 

Afentakis, Elektra M. 

7 Pme, Belmont 78 
Anderson, Virginia L. 

554 E. Riddle Ave., Ravenna, Ohio 
Barr, Mary P. 

31 Waverly, Bri.^hton 35 
Bilowz, Helen T. 

48 Seery, Maiden 48 
Blaha. Lucille M. 

Lake Shore Blvd., Erieside, Ohio 
Brewer, Constance M. 

48 Ober, Beverly 
Buck, Louise L 

99 Dean, Mansfield 
Busny, Charlotte F, 

19 Melvin Ave., Brighton 46 
Callahan, Mary A. 

22 Woodside Rd-, Medford 55 
Canzanelli. Phyllis 

300 Mr, Auburn, Watertown 72 
Chase, Barbara A. 

32 Warwick Rd., Belmont 78 
Clock, Marjorie L. 

Lake St., Litchfield, Conn. 
Connor, Nancy A. 

30 Longfellow Rd., Watertown 72 
Connors, Lillian F. 

5 Howland, Cambridge 38 
Creedon, Joan F. 

515 Dudley Ct., Westfield, N.J. 
Davison, Jeanne A. 

76 Washington, Belmont 78 
Dickinson, Jane E. 

69 Meadowbrook Rd-, W. Hartford 7, Conn. 
Dohercy, Mary J. 

2240 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge 40 
Downey, Ruch M. 

15 Gibson, Dorchester 22 
Egan, Jeanne M. 

48 Oakley Rd., Belmont 78 
Febncius, Ruth M, 

26 Pleasant, Baldwinsville 



Backstep breather. 



Lou72ge letter. 




answers and earned their rings. 



Fenno, M;iry E. 

Academy Hill Rd.. Westminster 
Gaffey, Elizabeth F. 

41 Oneida, Lynn 
Hendershot, BarbiiraJ. 

131 Squire Hill Rd.. Upper Montclair. N. J, 
Hoenk, Elizabeth 

8918 Dauphin Ave,, Chicago 19, HI- 
Johnston, Marion N, 

28 Birch, Saugus 
Kirkland, Martha W. 

212 Oak, Indian Orchard 
Lanipan, Margaret M- 

9 St. William, Dorchester 25 
Lynn, Priscilla L. 

59 Governors Rd,, Milton 86 
Maillet, Josephine A. 

22 Murray Ave., MiUon 86 
Mindess, Mary G. 

54 Forsyth, Boston 15 
Murphy, Isabelle 

35 Common, Scituate 
Norberg, Elizabeth 

26 Warwick, E. Lynn 
Pagnini, AlbaT. 

42 Waverly, Everett 49 
Radner, Norma L. 

115 Commonwealth Ave,, Springheld 8 
Reynolds, Joan L. 

106 Hewlett, Roslmdale 31 
Ricker, Eleanor J. 

Nobleboro, Maine 
Rodgers, Barbara J. 

46 Dalton Rd., Chelmsford 
Schneider, Barbara 

580 Blue Hill Ave., Roxbury 21 
Segal, Judith 

266 Seaver, Roxbury 21 
Stamatos, Georgia 

33 Halifax, Jamaica Plain 30 
Tarazewich, Eleanor F. 

14 Green, Saco, Maine 
Twombly, Marcia A, 

40 School, Groveland 
Valacellis, Alcmene 

24 Merrifield Ave,, Watertown 72 
Wallace, Betty L. 

1814 Becklev, Honolulu 45, T, H. 
Wilkshire, Persis 

321 Huron Ave., Cambridge 38 
Wright, Peggy J. 

4 Arbella'^Rd., Dorchester 24 



Convertible comfmiters . 





ENGLISH 

Boudreau, Shirley A. 

8 Pond, E. Boston 
Crosby, Joyce A. 

14 Main, Cooperstown, N. Y. 
Czarnecki, Loretta C. 

317 Chicopee, Chicopee 
Dowey, Joan L. 

61 Blackburn Rd., Summit. N. J. 
Ellis, Carolvn 

5 Helen Ave,, W. Orange, N. J. 
Fourel, Jeannie A, 

11 Griggs Ter., Brookline 46 
Gill, Margaret E. 

22 Varnum, Worcester 3 
Gould, Allen A. 

275 Moose Hill Pkwy., Sharon 
Graves, Jane 

Army Chemical Center, Edgewood, Md. 
Griffin, Phoebe L. 

Litchfield, Conn. 
Guarino, Jennie F. 

32 Lawrence, Brockton IZ 
Henchcliffe, Jane E, 

Marion Rd,, Rochester 
Holden, Judith A. 

90 Maple Ave,, White Plains, N. Y. 
Houle, Barbara H. 

20 Ludlow, Worcester 3 
Idestrom, Joan G. 

Llewellyn Pk., W. Orange, N. J. 
Jennings, Eleanor K. 

9 Allen Cir., Milton 86 
Klein, AdeleS. 

75 Brownell, Worcester 2 
Lash, Jane 

21 Andrews Ave., Falmouth Foreside, Portland, Maine 
Long, Carolyn 

3 Rita, Wilkes-Barre, Penna. 
Malis, Marion C. 

79 Nesmith, Lawrence 
Maxwell, Mary E. 

102 E. 22nd, New York 10, N. Y. 
Paulsen, Gloria L. 

31 Gillette, W. Hartford 7, Conn. 



89 



Pineau, Mary L. 

24 Commonwealth Rd,, Watertown 72 
Richer, Marguerite C. 

2 The High Rd., Bronxville 8, N. Y. 
Sher, Eleanor H. 

108 Longfellow Rd., Worcester 2 
Shilter, Alice 

166 Fulron Park Ave., Waterbury 70, Conn. 
Speth, Nancv B. 

15 Standish Rd., Weliesley Hills 82 





They study as much as 



Scocc, Lillian E. 

2930 Ellicocr, N.W.. Washington 8. D. C. 
Sturges, Nancy E. 

Washington Ave., Hvannis Port 
Walsh. Marv P. 

501 W. Roxbury Pkway., W. Roxbury 32 
Willon, Virginia L. 

250 Scarsdale Rd., Crestwood, Tuckahoe 7, N. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Arthur, Marjorie G. 

71 Oak, Milton 87 
Briggs, Katherine M. 

2 Vaughn, Caribou, Maine 
Caron, Constance E. 

7 Wesrwood Dr., Worcester 3 
Church, Betty M. 

716 Northern Pkway., Baltimore 12. Md. 
Fitzgerald, Gwendolyn A. 

208 Lincoln, Winthrop 52 
Hallhauer, Dagmar C. 

188 Hale, Beverly 
Hill, Elizabeth M. 

40 Stuart Ave., Malverne, L. L, N. Y. 
Holes, Barbara J. 

Richmond Rd., Solon, Ohio 
Kain, Barbara B. 

374 N. Montgomery, Newburgh, N. Y, 
Kent, Esther C. 

14 Andover, N. Tewksbury 
Larkin. Alice W. 

1337 Quincy Shore Blvd., Quincy 69 
McLaughlin, Ellen A. 

161 Mystic, Arl ington 74 
Mueller. Marianne 

1325 Judson Ave.. Evanston, III. 
Pappajohn, Antigone J. 

407 Huntington Ave., Boston 15 
Paterson, Mary A. 

Maple Shade Rd., Middletown, Conn. 
Schuette, Roberta P. 

1150 5ch Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Senkowski, Dorothy H. 

238 Arlington, Watertovvn 72 
Sevin, Carol W. 

Laurel Hill Rd,, Norwich, Conn. 
Shute, Anne B. 

77 Middle, Gloucester 
Stewart, Caryl R. 

SOWaittPk., Franklin Park 
Truog, Martha R. 

1108 Grant, Madison 5, Wis. 
VanDerWerken, Katherine L. 

15 Stratford Ct., Cohoes, N. Y. 
Weeks, Patricia A, 

121 Webb, Weymouth 88 
Wright, Priscilla 

18 Wildwood Rd., Larchraont, N. Y. 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



Adler, Gertrude A. 

130 Fuller, Brookline 46 
Ashland, Sara L. 

22 Groton, Wellesley Hills 82 
Belofsky, Janet S. 

28 Channing, Newport, R. L 
Butler, Lois S. 

102 Standish. S- Braintree 85 
Chakerian, Alice 

202 High, Lawrence 
Charnicki, Irene B. 

361 Washington, Haverhill 
Corbiere, Annette M. 

35 Crocker Ave., Turners Falls 
Daly, Eleanor T. 

55 Thomas, Belmont 78 
Edmonds, Deborah 

639 Vine Ave., Highland Park, III. 
Gammans, Pearl E. 

101 Mammoth Rd., Lowell 
Melcher, Mary Lou 

1529 Boston, Detroit 6, Mich. 
Metcalfe, Dorothy L 

501 E. Ridge Rd., Rochester 5, N. Y. 
Moorachian, Rose 

89 Millet, Dorchester 24 
Neville, Doris O. 

468 Slocum Rd., N. Dartmouth 
Newton, Violetta A. 

212John, llion,N. Y. 
Parks, Mma E. 

602 Cabot, Beverly 
Pascucci, Catherine J. 

61 Main, Rockporc 
Rabinovitz, Janet S. 

85 Chambers, Boston 14 
Smith, Shirley 

10 Roberts Ave., Rutland, Vt. 
Whitehill, Margaret E. 

Passumpsic, Vt. 
Willard,JaneC. 

49 Osgood, Lowell 



NURSING 



Bordeaux, Barbara R. 

53 Elmwood, Millbury 
Carlson, Marian E. 

633 N. Rockford Ave., Rockford, 111. 
Casserly, Elizabeth A. 

39 St. Germain, Boston 15 
Duffy, Mary A- 

26 Lakeview Ave., Braintree 85 
Ferjulian, Eunice M. 

7 Lewis, Hudson 
Gaquin, Marjorie T. 

61 Highland, Avon 
Gilbride, Nancy M. 

276 Parkview Ave., Lowell 
Godes, Elinor M. 

549 Blue Hill Ave., Roxbury 19 
Heller, Carlotta F. 

219 Glenbrook Rd., Stamford, Conn. 
Henderson, Jean M. 

20 Edgeworth Rd., N. Quincy 71 
Hord, Genevieve T. 

Race Lane, Marstons Mills 
Isenbergh, Emily 

997 Madison Ave., Albany 3, N. Y. 
Kilby, Jay 

112 N. Midland Ave., Nyack, N. Y. 
Kristenson, Marilyn A. 

34 Sycamore, Somerville 43 
McCumber, Barbara E. 

95 Jefferson Ave., Everett 49 
Mead, Adrienne E. 

24 Carpenter, Amesbury 
Morin, Marjorie M. 

83 Montclair Ave., N. Quincy 71 
Neidig, Marcia J. 

418^0ak Ter., W. Reading, Pa. 
Peach, Joy E. 

23 Lincoln Ave., Marblehead 
PofFenberger, Jean E. 

12 Lowell Rd., W. Hartford 5, Conn. 
Porrazzo, Mane M. 

35 Walnut, Maynard 
Sawyer, Ann J. 

80 Park, Melrose 76 



Schumb, Carolyn M. 

27 Garden, Milton 86 
Schwartz, Frances 

816 Southern Artery, Quincy 69 
Smith, Nancy M. 

20 Woodside Pk., Winthrop 52 
Sweatc, Lois A. 

26 18th, Lowell 
Tenney, Nancy E. 

10 Taft Ave., White River Junction, Vt. 
VanLeuvan, Evelyn 

Main St., Yalesville, Conn, "^ 

Vietor, Ann E. 

15 Norcross, Rockville Centre, N. Y. 
Wilder, Barbara A. 

15 Carleton Rd., Belmont 78 
Willis, Cynthia A. 

17 Washington, Dedham 



PREPROFESSIONAL 



Adam, Janet J. 

92 Fremont, Harrison, N. Y. 
Andrea, Jean H. 

218 Guy Pk., Amsterdam. N. Y. 
Barber, Florence 

915 Crescent Rd., Charleston 2, W. Va. 
Bell, Constance M. 

32 Allen Cir., Milton 87 
Bruce. Jean H. 

45 Willis, New Bedford 
Burgess, Diana 

Bell Island, Rowavton, Conn. 
DiLeone, Zelia C. 

221 Broadway, Providence 3, R. 1. 
Dubin, Clara 

79 Poplar, Boston 14 
Friedman, Lillian L. 

51 Homestead, Roxbury 21 
Glazier, Leslie G. 

Ledgewold, Lincoln 
Goostray,Jane A. 

28 Hardy Ave., Watertown 72 
Johnston, Elaine H. 

62 Friendly Rd., Cranston 10, R. L 
Kaplan, Shirley E- 

22 Prospect, Lynn 
Keech, Joyce A. 

Squaw, Rock Rd., Moosup, Conn. 
Lewis, Naomi J. 

78 Hutchings, Roxbury 21 
Mishara, PhvUis 

629 Walk Hill, Mattapan 26 
Newman, Joan E. 

10 Hooper, Dorchester 24 



Football songfest brought 




90 



the rest of us, hut have more free time. 



Norton, Marv 

136 Wayne Ave., Ei;iscon, I'ii. 
Pazol, Gertrude 

27 Elm Hill Ave.. Roxburv 21 
Rothschild, Doris J. 

48 Centre, Woodniere, N. Y. 
Ruskin, Esteile F. 

100 Brunswick, Dorchester 21 
Slater, Glenna P. 

39 Clinton, Cambridge 39 
Sloane, Irene 

472 Broadway, Sonierville45 
Spitzer, jo-Anne R.. 

18 Ellsworth Pk,, Cambridge 39 
Sussman, Joanne R. 

936 Washington Elms, Cambridge 39 
Tuxbury, Sylvia J. 

35 Prospect, Ameshury 
Wetherell, Lois 

16 Chestnut Hill Ave., White Plains, N. Y. 
Woods, Nancy 

16 Low, Newbutyport 
Younglove, Clara L. 

1511 Dewey Ave., Rochester 13, N. Y. 



RETAILING 



Anderson, Carol R. 

450 Fountain Ave,, Reading, Pa. 
Bartlett, Barbara 

370 Mt. Vernon, Dedham 
Boyle, Elaine F. 

90 St. Gregory, Dorchester 24 
Brown, Mary E. 

610 Blaine, Detroit 2, Mich. 
Church, Betty M. 

716 Northern Pkway., Baltimore 12, Md. 
Clark, Joan 

19 Sagewood Ave., Albany 3, N. Y. 
Comings, Betsy E. 

96 Center, Richford, Vt. 
Curran, Ethel J. 

125 Northheld Ave., W. Orange, N. J. 
D'Amelio, Nina M. 

45-07 248th, Little Neck, L. L, N. Y. 
Devine, Janice M. 

4 Richardson, New Brunswick, N, J. 
Eraser, Emma L. 

181 High, Wareham 
Gardner, Jean M. 

323 Stevens, Lowell 
Gonzales, JoAnne F. 

30 Marvin, Montpelier, Vt. 
Hagerman, Nancy J. 

80 Prospect Ave. ,GIoversville,N.Y. 
Haskell, Virginia A. 

1 Alpha Rd., Holden 



out the best in all. 




Hathmaker, jane G. 

375 Albany Ave., Kingston, N. Y. 
Hay, Marcia 

127 5th, Stamford, Conn. 
Hiscox, Barbara A. 

65 E. Mam, Jewett City , Conn. 
Keil, Evelyn M, 

187-56 115th Rd., St. Albans 12, N. Y. 
Kenney, Marv A. 

138 Berrian Rd., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Kohn, Nancy J. 

115 Holmecrest Rd., Jenkintown, Pa. 
Kudriavetz, Elizabeth 

32 Harlow Rd., Springfield, Vt, 
Lunchick, Doris S, 

1 Hilltop Rd.,Wellesley 81 
McCarthy, Sally A. 

56 Bretton Rd., W. Hartford 7, Conn. 
McCoubrey, Patricia E. 

1034 Commonwealth Ave., Brookline 46 
McDermott, Patricia A. 

54 Gilbert Rd., Belmont 78 
McEachron, Jane A. 

W. Broadway, Salem, N. Y. 
McGinty, Anne M. 

1819 ilth, N., St. Petersbury 6, Fla. 
McGreevv. Eleanor R. 

3672 Indian Rd., Toledo 6, Ohio 
Magnuson, Mildred J. 

39 Hayes, Arlington 74 
Moran, Margaret L. 

86 Grozier Rd., Cambridge 38 
Murphy. Ellen T. 

22 Smith, Lawrence 
Powers, Ruth A. 

199 Bacon, Natick 
Pozen, Marilyn J. 

19 Warren Rd., Maplewood, N. J. 
Prange, Ruth 

48 N. Point Dr., Sheboygan, Wis. 
Richer, Audrey J. 

2 The High Rd., Bronxviile 8, N. Y. 
Rossiter. Anne C. 

2 Pleasant, Ludlow, Vt. 
Schwarzwaelder, Nancy P. 

16 Laurel Ave.. Summit, N.J. 
Sheffer, Davida L. 

142 Beverly Rd,, Chestnut Hill 67 
Sidford, Jane 

Brunswick Hills, Troy, N. Y. 
Solonche, Nina R. 

19 Colliston, Brookline 46 
Steinberg, Rosalyn 

193 Pleasant, Brookline 46 
Stickle, Joan J, 

84 Plant, New London, Conn. 
Tevis, Adrienne I. 

338 S, East Ave., Oak Park, III, 
Weber, Ernestine A. 

8 Oberlin Rd., Hamden 14, Conn. 
Weeks, Marjorie A. 

66 Chestnut, Andover 
Wingate, Joan M. 

301 Summit Ave., Brookline 46 
Zetariuk, Margaret 

80 Blackstone, Woonsocket, R. I. 

SCIENCE 

Ambye, Edith L. 

12 Fletcher. Andover 
Beauchemin, Helen M. 

71 Park Ave. Ext., Arlington 74 
Beer, Joanne G. 

66 Victoria, Lowell 
Benham, Lois M. 

53 Bay State Ave., Somervilte 44 
Binkowski, Jane M. 

44 Eden, Chelsea 50 
Bohn, Ellen M. 

Frognersterveien 37, Slemdal, Oslo, Norway 
Butler, Loretta 

25 Grant, Cambridge 38 
Celozzi, Evemarie G. 

9 Genoa Ave,, Milford 
Chin. Helen G. 

77 Harrison Ave,, Boston 11 
Clarke, Gloria E. 

86 Munroe, Roxbury 19 
Colligan, Joan M. 

23 Northend Ave., Salem 
Covin, Barbara E. 

66a Chatham Rd., Everett 49 



91 



ille43 



. H. 



Crowe, Joan M, 

5 Michigan Rd., Worcester 6 
DesMaisons, Renee J. 

8 Sagamore Rd., Marblehead 
Diller. NeldaR. 

137 S. Prince, Lancaster, Pa. 
Donahue, Mary E. 

117 Appleton, Arlington 74 
Douglas. Anna 

218 Somerville Ave., Somervil 
Fallon, Mary P, 

16 Faulkner, Dorchester 22 
Finley, Charlotte M. 

3 Church Ct., Woburn 
Fitzgerald, Marilyn B. 

71 Whipple Ave,, Laconia, N. 
Gunsalus, Suzanne G. 

19Summit Ave,, Larchmont, N. Y. 
Hagman, Norma C. 

152 Quincy Ave,, Winthrop 52 
Hoffman, Frances B. 

61 Acorn, Maiden 48 
John, Marion W. 

7 Patterson Way, S, Boston 27 
Judson. Doris M. 

120 Dartmouth, Boston 15 
FCelly. Eleanor M, 

96 Wentworth Ave., Lowell 
Kelly, Joan A. 

17 South, Cambridge 38 
Lee, Nellie E. 

35 Willard, Cambridge 38 
Lorina, Phyllis L, 

23 Clark, Boston 13 
Lowenstein, Nancy E, 

45 Lawton Ave., Hartsdale, N. Y. 
McMurray, Beverly A. 

146 Lowell, Arlington 74 
Peloquin, Alice L. 

566 Lincoln, Marlboro 
Philip, Jeanne L. 

14 Royall, Canton 
Reichard, Marie Louise 

420 E. 86th, New York 28, N. Y. 
Sadovitz, Eleanor R. 

16 Nightingale, Dorchester 24 
Sansom, Dorothy S, 

7 Wait, Roxbury 20 
Sawyer, Marv C. 

Whitingham, Vt. 
Searle, Beverly J. 

79 First, Hamden 14, Conn, 
Sessa, Rosemarie 

45 Newbury, Lawrence 
Thompson, Jean B. 

142 North Rd,, Bedford 
Trabish, Eleanor C. 

25 Atherton, Boston 19 
Tvnan, Mary R. 

'140 Allen Ave,, Waban 68 
Walker, Constance F. 

81 Middlesex Rd., Chestnut Hill 67 




Juniors indoctrinate the freshmen and usher 




Gaetz.-, Nelson, Rollings, 
Magoon. 

Zombie came back early this 
Fall with a nice pink sunburn 
which nobody noticed and he 
couldn't figure out why. But he 
had come back early to welcome 
the Freshmen with the rest of the 
Welcome Committee, and had no 
time to quibble. 

At the Bib Party in October, he 
saw himself on everyone's bib, and 
could remember very vividly some 
of the skit's highlights happening 
to him just two years before. In 
December, he watched his Juniors 
rehearse for "White Iris," and 
Fossils or no Fossils, the judges 
were absolutely right in awarding 
his cast the silver cup. 

After Christmas vacation, he 
wagged good-by to the nurses, 
after their January party, and in 
February at News Banquet, he 
trumpeted triumphantly as Jun- 
iors took over the executive board 
of News. In March, for the Junior 
Prom he conceded a point and wore 
tails since his own was nothing to 
speak of; and later that month. 



with much to speak of, he nomi- 
nated and elected Juniors to Stu-G 
offices. 

In April, was Frosh-Junior Jam- 
boree, where he expected to find 
lots of it till someone explained 
that the jam referred to sessions. 
That same month, the new Mic 
staff was chosen from his class, and 
in May he found out that everyone 
he voted for was elected, when the 
year's election results were an- 
nounced at Stu-G May Party. 

After finals in June when every- 
one went picking daisies he found 
a very nice clover patch, being a 
domestic pachyderm, and wove his 
own clover chain for the Seniors. 



BUSINESS 

Austin, Janet 

53 Raleigh, Belmont 78 
AzarofF, Carmen H. 

800 Beacon. Boston 15 
Barrow, Marie 

399 Massachusetts Ave., Boston 18 
Bradley, Joan E. 

27 Greenway, Hamden 14, Conn. 
Corcoran, Mary E. 

613 Heath, Broolcline67 
Curtiss, Catherine M. 

47 Wendell, Cambridge 38 
Dee, Mary G. 

39 Hurlcroft Rd., Milton 86 
Dilanni. Elda C. 

135 Endicott, Boston 13 
Donovan, Elizabeth L. 

19 Wannalancit, Lowell 



Docley, Dorothy E. 

285 Harvard. Cambridge 39 
Dorman, Madeline C. 

64 Preston, Everett 49 
Dutton, Marilyn 

26 York Ter., Melrose 76 
Feinherg, Elinor M, 

58 Johnston Rd., Boston 24 
Fish, Mary V. 

55 Hilburn, Roslindaie 31 
Glazer, Esther L. 

10 Walnut Rd.. Somerville 45 
Hagan, Pauline C. 

105 PIvmouth, Stratford, Conn, 
Hall, Elizabeth A. 

121 Main, Yarmouth, Maine 
Hammond, Natalie 

7 Chapel Hill. Wareham 
Happ, Murgo A. 

170 Waterman, Providence 6, R. 1. 
Joakim, Seva J. 

46 Louis. Hyannis 
Johnson, Ann-Marie E. 

190 S. Quinsigamond Ave., Shrewsbury 
Johnson, Joanne 

460 Central Ave., Milton 86 
K.iley, Grace M. 

54 Gallivan Blvd., Dorchester 24 
Leiecas, Helen D. 

75 Monastery Rd., Brighton 35 
Lipton, Elaine 

523 Farm, New Bedford 
McGioughlin, Mary L. 

8 Washington, Sconeham 80 
McNultv, Marjorie C. 

190 Perham, W. Roxbury 32 
Marsion, Mary E. 

16 Federal, Kezar Falls, Maine 
Morgan, Jean H. 

276 Quincy Ave., E. Braintree 84 
Nichols, Jane 

Chestnut St., N. Reading 
Norton, Arlene O. 

Sauquoit, N. Y. 
Rose, DorothyJ, 

4 Mendum, Roslindaie 31 
Schott. Rosematv 

70 Birch, Clinton 
Shea, Natalie B. 

169 Summer, Gardner 
Sutherland, Gladys G. 

138 Sherman, Belmont 78 
Tidmansen, Marian J, 

12 Shawmut, Quincy 69 



Nancy seems to have a good one to tell. 




91 



at graduation. 



VanlDerMerlen, Mary J. 

28 Ardmore Rd., \V. Newton 65 
Welch, Parricia A. 

1103 State Rd., N. Adams 
Whittemore, Dorothy R. 

1 East, Stoneham 80 
Young, Elizabeth L. 

Mountain Rd., N. Wilbrah.im 
Zie^ler, Isabel 

I'Bayside Dr., Plandome, N. Y, 



ENGLISH 



Alexander, Frieda 

12 Malcolm Rd., Cambridge 38 
Barbalian, Alice V. 

231 College, Springfield 9 
Barraclough, Dale 

31 Plymouth Rd,. Needham 92 
Barrow, Frances A. 

181 Brown, Waltham 54 
Bell. V. Phyllis 

122 Clifton Ave., Clifton 
Bloom, Betty D. 

1405 Blue Hill Ave., Mattapan 26 
Bown, Virginia L. 

Buffalo, Rd., E. Aurora, N. Y. 
Brown, Barbara A. 

170 Prospect, Leominster 
Bryan, Elizabeth A. 

1744 Hartshorn Rd., E. Cleveland 12, Ohio 
Creeley, Mary L. 

130 Newbury, Lawrence 
Prabotta, Elsie 

N. Main St., N. Uxbridge 
Hirsh, Jean B. 

Gray Lodge, Pikesville 8, Md. 
Hunnefield, Joyce M. 

400 E. 49th, New York N. Y. 
Irish, Margaret 

Turner, Maine 
Katen, Estelle F. 

255 Adams, Milton 86 
Keith, Marjorie F. 

3 Oak Ter., Newton Highlands 61 
Keyes, Jacquelyn R. 

56 Commonwealth Rd., Watertown 72 
Knox, Dorothy 

106 Fair Oaks Ave., Newtonvilte 60 



Barbara Brown seems to have time jor 
a night out. 





But poor Kay has the ivashing to do 



Lurenz, Kathleen E. 

48 Burton, Walton, N. Y. 
McNamee, Dolly 

98 S. Lmwood Ave., Pittsburgh 5, Pa. 
Mar|ollet,Janine E- 

585 Washington, Brookline 46 
Moore, Helen R. 

8 Sycamore, SomerviUe 43 
Palmisano, Lorraine P. 

84 Irving, Cambridge 38 
Pike, Helo^ise B. 

40 Cranberry Rd., Weymouth 88 
Replog'e, Roy 

40 Winchester, Brookline 46 
Russell, Minerva A. 

455 Clinton, New Bedford 
Saunders, Bernice 

421 Central, Saugus 
Schneider, Marjone A. 

84-25 Edgerton Blvd., Jamaica, L. L, N. Y. 
Sherad, Shirley E. 

13 Lowe, Quincy 69 
Sikalis, Eugenia 

256 Ruggles, Boston 15 
Smith, Katherine R. 

200 Rockland, Bingham 
Wattenmaker, Arline M. 

12910 FairhiU Rd., Cleveland 20, Ohio 
Webb, Nancy E. 

7 Summit Rd., Hamden 14, Conn. 
White, Jocelyn A. 

33 Washington Ave., Andover 
Wironen, Irene 
49 Peabody, Gardner 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Angell, Mertie E. 

40 W. Main, Millbury 
Behrsin, Elizabeth A. 

68 Pleasant, E. Walpole 
Chauvin, Elaine B. 

14 5th Ave., Webster 
Clifford, Mary O. 

20 Kirk, W. Roxbury 32 
Davenport, Sally C. 

106 Lewis Ave., Walpole 
Downing, Myrtle C. 

W. Campton, N. H. 
DuPlessis, Joan O. 

323 Forest Ave., Swampscott 
Farren, Helena E. 

41 Newhall, Dorchester 22 
Gaetz, Geraldine L. 

Laurel Hts., Shelton, Conn. 
Gullifer, Nancy K. 
82Cushing Ave,, Belmont 78 



Hahn, Carolyn 1. 

8 Park End PI.. Forest Hills, N. Y. 
Howell, Jeanne L. 

1061 Rosalie Ave., Lakewood 7, Ohio 
Humphrey, Elizabeth E. 

520 Ash, Winnetka, III. 
Leys, Rita E. 

137 Bliss Rd., Newport, R. I. 
Love, Eleanor A. 

29 Loveland Rd., Brookline 46 
Nelson, Harriet E, 

287 Stratford, W. Roxbury 32 
Nelson, Ruth A. 

24 Coolidge Ave., Hingham 
Nowak, Teresa 

186 Payson Rd., Belmont 78 
O'Hare, Nancy L. 

36 Cedarwood Rd., Boston 30 




93 




We wonder just how much 



Peterson, Carol S. 

15 Aberdeen Rd., Milcon 86 
Ripley Joan 

3 Windemere Cir., Braintree 84 
Rollins Janec 

142 Highland Ave., Meriden, Conn. 
Seelinger, Alice M. 

4 Avon, Cambridge 38 
Smirh, Patricia M. 

1308 Ashland Ave., Santa Monica, Calif. 
Stremlau, Janice N. 

206 Auburn Rd., W. Hartford 7, Conn. 
Svenson, Martha E. 

45 Sheridan Dr., Milton 86 
Talbot, Katharine R. 

68 Clark Rd., Lowell 
Terry, Beverly A. 

135 Crestview Dr., Pittsburgh 27, Pa. 
TiJton, Catherine B. 

Chilmark 
Tomko, Dorothy A. 

39 Jane, Shelton 4, Conn. 
Whitehill, Christie 

Passumpiic, Vt. 
Wong, Audrey J. 

56 Beach, Boston 11 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Celia, Chtistine J. 

89 Wheeler Ave., Brockton 23 
Curtin, Helen F. 

27 Glendale Ave., Everett 49 
Erwin, Lois J. 

37 Woolnough Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. 
Ferroli. Patricia L. 

10 Hamilton, Dorchester 25 
Foss, Beverly N. 

24 Maitland, Milton 86 
Holmes, Dorothy M. 

99 Norway, Boston 15 
Jenkins, Ruth H. 

11 Steele, Stoneham 80 
FCiefer, Audrey A. 

507 Parsons, Easton, Pa, 
Kyriacopoulos, Anne 

819 Chelmsford, Lowell 
LaCourse, Ellaine M. 

57 George, Bristol, Conn, 
McKee, Jeannette L. 

186 Main, Lancaster, N. H. 
Marks, Marjorie G. 

100 Hutchings, Roxbury 21 
Miller, Lorraine A. 

47 Sergeant, Sodus, N. Y. 



Patch, Louise 

N. Hartland, Vt. 
Pellegrini, Jennie H. 

527 Crescent, Brockton 34 
Pressey, Carol A. 

113 Moreland, Somerville 45 
Reisner, Barbara 

1284 Commonwealth Ave., Boston 34 
Relyea, Alice L. 

Munson Rd., Wolcott, Warerbury 84, Conn. 



NURSING 

Andrews, Elizabeth A. 

148 Wordsworth, E. Boston 28 
Archibald, Eleanor D. 

20 North Ave., Melrose 76 
Ashcroft, Barbara A. 

20 Loring, Islington 
Bartlett, Ruth V.' 

49 Varnum Ave., Lowell 
Berger, Sara L. 

76 Rockwell, Naugatuck, Conn. 
Bronlund, Anne-Marie 

43 Beverly, Pittsheld 
Cavoures, Katherine G. 

444 Fletcher, Lowell 
Clasby, Joan M. 

175 Walnut, Brookline46 
Cousins, Cynthia 

Mt. Pleasant, N. Billerica 
Daley, Virginia H. 

222 4th, Providence 6, R. L 
Ferris, Lorraine M. 

90 Ruggles, Quincy 69 
Fuller, Jean E. 

53 Greenfield, Brockton 46 
Gould, Rosamond W. 

121 Federal, Salem 
Haskell, Barbara E. 

258 Salmon, Manchester, N. H. 
Hayden, Elizabeth J. 

736 High, Fall River 
Hayes, Audrev M. 

169 Cottage Pk. Rd., Winthrop 52 
Heywood, Marjorie 

85 Elm, Gardner 
Houston, Helen J. 

21 Clive, N. Quincy 71 
Ladd, Lillian R. 

139 Cass, Portsmouth, N. H. 
Leupold, Shirley C. 

25 Harvard Rd,, Belmont 78 
Lowe, Virginia B. 

417 Brook, Framingham Center 
MacDonnell, Ann T. 

59 Commonwealth Rd., Watertown 72 
MacLeod, Isabel A. 

8 High, N. Wilmington 
McMordie, Leslie E. 

22 Venner, Arlington 74 
Matthews, Jane O, 

8 Shaw Rd., Wellesley Hills 82 
Miller, Virginia A. 

24 Murray Hill Rd., Roslindale 31 
Mondeau, Alice L. 

118 N. Bedford, E. Bridgewater 
Noonan, Frances I. 

44 Elliot Ave., N. Quincv 71 
Orcutt, Beverly M. 

17 Belcher, Holbrook 
Palumbo, Gloria A. 

88 Clarendon Ave., E. Lynn 
Ramin, Cynthia D. 

400 Wellesley Ave., Wellesley Hills 
Richards, Julianna M. 

40 Murray Hill Rd., Roslindale 31 
Richardson, Carol L. 

100 Lowell. Methuen 
Smith, Lillian M. 

96 Nantasket Ave., N. Cohasset 
Sullivan, Clare P. 

73 Monarch, Fall River 
Taber, Ruth E. 

Box 19, Mt. Hermon 
Urcelay, Gloria E. 

327 Mt. Pleasant, Fall River 
Walker, Joyce D. 

2493 Albany Ave., W. Hartford 7. Conn. 



Waterbury, Emily E, 
R.F.D. 2, Stamford, Com 

Woodbury, Barbara H. 
338 Western Ave., Lynn 



PREPROFESSIONAL 

Blue, Alice L. 

23 Buena Vista Pk., Cambridge 40 
Cohen, Dorothy E. 

20 Alton P!., Brookline46 
Coolidge, Ruth M. 

South St., Petersham 
Dakos, Katherine J. 

122 Mt. Washington, Lowell 
Ershler, Nancy 

603 Delaware Ave., Erie. Pa. 
Fahey, Dorothy A. 

21 Victoria, Lowell 
Greene, Joanna 

130 Marsh, Belmont 78 
Greene, Rosanne 

455 Twin Oak Rd., S. Orange, N. J. 
Kelley, Margaret M. 

95 Highland Ave., Somerville 43 
Kelley, Mary L. 

165 Standish Rd. , Watertown 72 
Law, Eleanor W. 

9 Garland, Lynn 
Levine, Gloria L. 

7 Gardner, Salem 
Lewis, Arlene B. 

35 South, Brighton 35 
Lipofsky, Mona H. 

275 Winthrop Ave., New Haven 11, Conn. 
Lohse, Margaret E. 

18 Tappan, Attleboro 
Millinger, Carolyn G. 

York Village. Maine 
Monahan, Mary M. 

472 Canton, Stoughton 
Neizer, Shirley V. 

47 Osgood, Salem 
Nelson, Joanne E. 

629 Washington, Wellesley 81 
Orive, Lilly A. 

8 Ave. Sur 43, Guatemala City, Guatemala 
Poliey, Jean F. 

189 Wood, Lexington 73 



This IS ivhat ive tell the jreslmien so they 
dont 




94 



influence the pink elephant has had. 



Rodgers, Shirley L. 

46 DaltonRd., Chelmsford 
Rosen. Ruth 

80 Freeman, Quincy 70 
Roth, Helen N. 

179 Eascford Rd., Souchbrid^e 
Schell. Vivian 

24 Biclcnell, Dorchester 21 
Schuman, Anne A. 

Box 202, Latrobe. Pa. 
Tupper, Ruby W. 

19 N. Main, Avon 
Wasser, RosJyn B. 

70 Columbia, Brookline 46 
W'edger, Nancy F. 

500 Dedham, Newton Centre 59 
Wilner, June D. 

377 Turner, Auburn, Maine 



RETAILING 

Alperin, Barbara J. 

550 Ward, Newton Centre 59 
Bancroft, Natalie S. 

71 Sherman, Portland 4, Maine 
Bernard, Kathryn T. 

227 High, Newburyporc 
Branaghan, Jeanne M. 

29 Pleasant. Attleboro 
Buddv, Margaret E, 

454 Glen, Glen Falls 4, N. Y. 
Cannon, Carolyn A, 

622 W. Witherbee, Flint 4, Mich. 
Cleave, Mary L. 

Box 2305, Sheridan Park, Bremerton, Wash. 
Conley, Susanne F. 

126 Belmont, Brockton 10 
Diamond, Carol S. 

340 Radel Ter., S. Orange, N. J. 
Dickerman, Winifred 

187 Central, Somerville 45 
Garner, Shirley E, 

55 Florence Ave., Norwood 
Gleason, Patricia E. 

751 W. Douglas, Jacksonville, HI. 
Goldstein, Myrna R. 

308 Church, N. Adams 
Greenlaw, Audrey J. 

5 Chestnut, Melrose 76 
Holmes, Shirley J. 

36 Bellevue Ave., Norwood 



get the wrong impression jrom College 0pp. 




Jacob-;, Helen R. 

23 Egremont, Brighton 35 
Maisel, Florence C. 

349 Crown, Brooklyn 25. N. Y. 
Malouin, Barbara J. 

1880 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton 35 
Mannon, Jean A. 

935 State, Lima, Ohio 
Miller, Mary A. 

2818 N.W. Beuhia Vista, Portland 11, Ore. 
Morris, Jean P. 

295 School, Berlin N. H. 
Moskovitz, Shirley A. 

384 Crescent, Athol 
Mueller, Ruth L. 

101 E. Devon, Milwaukee 11, Wis. 
Nathan, Dorothy S. 

144 Floral Ave., Maiden 48 
Oakley, Mary J. 

Lake Shore Rd., Geneva-on-the-Lake, Ohio 
Payjack, Marcia E. 

214 Pearl, Medina, N. Y. 
Pavjack, Maxine E. 

214 Pearl, Medma, N. Y, 
Perlmutter, Lucille E. 

44 Pond, Framingham 
Perman, Rita M. 

50 Ocean Pkway., Brooklyn 18, N. Y. 
Rogers, Eleanor G. 

110 Bradford Ave., Keene, N. H. 
Rood, Joan K. 

30 Pearl, Meriden, Conn. 
Sargent, Barbara E. 

177 Lexington, Watertown 72 
Simendinger, Shirley M. 

28 OIney, Watertown 72 
Sims, Mary T. 

411 Hamilton Cres., Clearwater, Fla. 
Solomon, Roslyn E. 

139 Fern, Waterbury 56, Conn. 
Thomas, Marilyn J. 

520 Wyoming Ave., MiUburn, N. J. 
Whitestone, Barbara S. 

117 Columbia. Brookline 46 
Wolfson, Barbara A. 

1515 Beacon, Brookline 46 



SCIENCE 

Anastasia, Marjorie G. 

106 Cottage Ave., Winchrop52 
Aslanian, Veronica A. 

153 Lexington Ave., Cambridge 38 
Barber, Martha K. 

28 Brier Rd., W. Roxbury 32 



Barry, Barbara M. 

150 Jason, Arlington 74 
Besas, Marjorie A. 

43 Calton Rd., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Burke. Mary E. 

37 Hill, New Bedford 
Elzenbeck, Virginia M. 

89 Nelson Ave,, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 
Feldman, Mar|orie E. 

409 Fountain, New Haven, Conn. 
Foss, Beverly A. 

7 Chilton Rd., Brockton 55 
Goldman, Elaine R. 

1007 }4 N. Madison, Rome. N. Y. 
Griffiths. Elizabeth M. 

115 Sherwood Rd., Medford 55 
Helman, Elaine H, 

1 Howland, Roxbury 21 
Kearns, Margaret M. 

47 W, Walnut Pk., Roxbury 19 
Kihn, I. R. Patricia 

R.F.D. 2, Blue Mill Rd., Morristown, N. J. 
Lallv, M, Jeannine 

72 ^ High, Milford 
Lipshires, Barbara F. 

130 Fuller, Brookline 46 
Longley, Margaret H. 

144 Elmwood Rd., Vetona, N. J. 
Magoon, Lois E, 

Gilman, Vt, 
Montgomery, John A. 

8 Howe, Dorchestet 25 
Moore, Frances M. 

255 Tremont, Newton 58 
Moses, Fanny O. 

R.F.D. 2, Gorham, Maine 
Murray, Gertrude E. J. 

842 Edmands Rd.. Framingham Center 
O'Connor, Dorothy J, 

156 Welles Ave., Dorchester 24 
Phillips. Joan C. 

113 Pleasant. Lowell 
Powers, Patricia A. 

25 Lee, Salem 
Reguera, Dolores J. 

97 Woodcliff, Roxbury 25 
Richardson, Alice tC. 

50 S. Main, Middleton 
Rosenstein, Muzza 

240/A Rte. de la Tour, Shanghai 18, China 
Smith, Minnie B. 

46 Fisher Ave.. Roxburv 22 
Theall. Claire E. 

88 Gordon, Brighton 35 
Thompson, Barbara A. 

104 Keith, W- Roxbury 32 
Wason, Barbara J. 

21 Allen Ave., Waban 68 




95 



Seniors take a long last look and can't 




Church, Yelle, Thompson, 
Brenner. 



When Dopey came to college in 
September, 1945, to prepare for an 
independent livelihood, he felt 
right at home with the '49ers who 
registered with him. He was very 
happy tagging along with them 
until the day he was two girls com- 
ing from four directions at the 
same time. He vowed to give up 
whistling for life, until Doc (Timm) 
told him there were two sets of 
twins in this class he was mascot- 
ing. 

After the Bib Party in October, 
where he met without warning a 
fellow mascot. Tabu S. Kunk, he 
supervised rehearsals for the Fresh- 
man Compets play, "LadiesAlone." 
After the judges announced the 
winning play to be the Juniors' 
there was a long, frantic search for 
the silver cup of roses. Doc finally 
found it when he found Dopey, 
headed backstage to present it to 
his Freshmen. 



There was the Frosh-Soph Valen- 
tine Party after midyears. Dopey 
passed his exams with flying ma- 
roon and white since Doc had not 
held the lantern too close to his 
work. And in March came the 
Freshman Prom, but Dopey had a 
date that night to chaperone a 
Theta Chi party, so little Douglass 
Gray, dressed in Dopey's other 
suit, subbed for him. In May on 
Freshman campus, there was a 
dorm-commuter party with step- 
singing on the Colonnade; and at 
Open House Dopey appeared in the 
receiving line with Dean Mesick 
and President Beatley, because 
someone told him it was the punch 
line — the line to the punch bowl, 
that is. 

Sophomore year was exciting. 
The choice of '49ers play for Com- 
pets, "Accent on Revenge," had 
nothing to do with the previous 
year's disappointment. This year 
it was the '49ers' turn to give their 
Freshman sisters Christmas gifts 
and valentines at the traditional 
parties. Dopey didn't get his class 
ring at Soph Luncheon in April be- 
cause of the delay involved in stand- 
ardizing the choices of rings. But 
the Luncheon itself was fun, and 



when the rings did arrive they were 
certainly worth waiting for, though 
no one had made a point of wait- 
ing. There was too much going on. 
Soph Shuffle featured the Bluettes. 
At May Breakfast, Ellie Tufts as 
king crowned the May queen, and 
the next night the King and Queen 
of the Cotton Ball were crowned at 
an informal all-college dance to 
raise everybody-knows-what for 
the Soph treasury. 

By 1947 Dopey's miners were dig- 
ging away on the Junior Welcome 
Committee, Bib Party, plans for 
the Academy reception to which 
fifteen juniors were invited, and all 
the functions that are Junior jobs. 
Dopey, after the third time which 
did not fail, finally presented his 
'49ers with the Compets award for 
their play, "Purple Doorknob." 
He tried on the Junior nurses' caps, 
all fifteen of them, after their cap- 
ping service in January. He had a 
date for dinner at eight in Febru- 
ary at the Hotel Somerset — Jun- 
ior Prom. And for the Frosh-Junior 
Jamboree he was the only one 
allowed to come without a costume. 
Also he was the only one who knew 
all the words to "Father Time", 
which for some probably good rea- 



Four years of step-singing, hall-table voting. 




96 



believe it. 



son is called the "sister song." 
Doris Klop was chosen Carnation 
Queen that spring, and County 
Fair kept the whole school hop- 
ping. After finals in June, Dopey 
carried the umbrella and pillow- 
cases while Juniors, in slickers, 
picked daisies for Commencement 
Daisy Chain. 

Ruth Thompson was elected 
Senior class president, and in Octo- 
ber at the Hobo Party Dopey's 
patches were really pushed into the 
shade. In December, came Olde 
English Dinner, and after mid- 
years was Senior Prom, Club '49, 
which impressed Dopey right into 
white tie and tails. Mosts, bests, 
and favorites were announced in 
April after practice work at Senior- 
Faculty Supper. 

The weeks, which had passed so 
slowly four years before, were 
barely accounted for now. It was 
time for Class Day, time for Bac- 
calaureate, time for Commence- 
ment, time for the future. It is 
time for the second half -century in 
which the materials mined during 
this first half-century will be used 
to build within our minds and the 
world the foundations of peace and 
happiness. 



cojfee at Jimmy' s. 





Hobo parfy, ive can let down our hair after four years. 



MOSTS AND BESTS 

Most Popular 

Eleanor Tufts 
Most Likely to Succeed 

Esther Maletz 
Most Beautiful 

Doris Klop 
Most Charming 

Helen Ryan 
Most Efficient 

Jane Bond 
Most Energetic 

Eleanor Tufts 
Most Bostonian 

Barbara Carney 
Wittiest 

Carolyn Benson 
Best Dressed 

Dorothy Allison 
Favorite Man Prof 

Wylie Sypher 
Eavorite Woman Prof 

Ina Granarra 
Eavorite Mascot 

Dopey 




97 




PRISCILLA AINSWORTH 

Library Science. 20 North St., Grafton, Mass. 020 2, 3, 4; Outing 

Club 1,2, Pan American 1 ; Valentine Party 2; Daisy Chain 3. 

DOROTHY ALLISON 

Prince. 304 Lake St., Belmont, Mass. Newman; Prince Club 2, 3^ 
President 4; May Breakfast 2; Daisy Chain 3; Baccalaureate; 
Hobo Party 4; President's Reception; Executive Board. 



DOROTHY D. ANDERSON 

Prince. Transferred. Nebraska State Teachers College 2. 1215 Hill 

Ave., Sioux City, iovva. Academy; Prince Club. 

ELIZABETH ADAMS ANDREWS 
Nursing. 148 Wardsworth St., East Boston. 




MARIAN E. ANDREWS 

Prince. Transferred U. of California. Lake Boon, Stow, Mass. 

Prince Club. 



ELEANOR D. ARCHIBALD 

Nursing. 20 North Ave., Melrose, Mass. Anne Strong 2, 3, 4; 

Glee Club 2; Orchestra 2, 3. 





KATHERINE C. ARLAUSKAS 

Preprofessional. 44 Antwerp St., Brighton, Mass. Academy 4; 
Ellen Richards 3; Glee Club 1, Mic 2, 3, Adverrising Manager 4; 
Outing Club 1; PCA 2; YWCA 3; Mic Dance 3. 

MARYANN BALCH 

English. 115 Washington St., Manchester, Conn. 



MEREDYTHE J. BARKER 

Home Economics. Transferred Vermont Junior College 2. 18 
Albert St., Agawam, Mass. Glee Club 3; Home Economics Club 
2, 3, 4; Outing Club 2, 4; Pan American 2. 

RUTH BARTLETT 

Nursing. 49 Varnum Ave., Lowell, Mass. Anne Strong 2, 3, 4; 

Outing Club 2. 






H£L£N LORRAINE BATCHELDER 

Home Economics. Langdon, N. H. Home Economics Club 2, 3. 
4; Mu-4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3; YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4; Valentine Party 2; 
Junior Welcome 3; Fire Warden 1, 4. 

JANICE BEARDSLEY 

Prince. 12 Thomas Avenue, Batavia, New York. Mic 1, 2; Outing 
Club 1; Prince Club 2, 3, 4; County Fair 3; Soph ShufBe 2; Daisy 
Chain 3; Dorm Board 2; Dorm Council 2; House Senior 4. 





/£^N M. BECK 

Business. 193 Manthorne Road, W. Roxbury, Mass. Newman 
1, 2, 3, 4; Outmg Club, Scribunal; Soph Luncheon 2; Junior 
Welcome 3. 

HELEN BELEZOS 

Preprofessional. 70 Chestnut St., Quincv, Mass. Glee Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Micl,l; Orthodo.K 2, President 3, 4; YWCA 1,2,3, President 
4; Valentine Party 2; Junior Welcome 3; Baccalaureate 2, 3; Com- 
mencement 2, 3. 



HARRIET C. BELSON 

Preprofessional. 980 Blue Hill Ave., Dorchester, Mass. Academy 
3, 4; English Club 2, 3, 4; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; IZFA 2, 3, 4; Le Cercle 
Francais 1; NSA 3, 4; News 1; Outing Club 3; PCA 3, 4. 

ADRIANNE S. BENSON 

Preprofessional. 80 Greenlawn Ave., Newton Center, Mass. 
Hillel 2, 3, 4; NSA 3; News 1, 2, 3; PCA 4; Freshman Formal 1; 
County Fair 3; Soph Shuffle 2; Daisy Chain 3; President's Re- 
ception; News Dance. 





99 



CAROLYN BENNETT BENSON 

Prince. 71 Fosdyke St., Providence, R. I. Pan American; Prince 

Club; County Fair 2; Soph Luncheon 2; Hobo Party 4; WNSA 

Representative. 

M. THERESE BENSON 

English. 23 West Park St., Brockton 24, Mass, English Club 1, 2, 
Secretary 3, 4; M/c 2, 3, Editor 4; NSA 3, 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; 
News 3; Simmons Review 4; M/c Dance 4. 





M/!R/LyN MOORE BENTON (MRS.) 

Science. 1699 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Mass. Academy 3, 

Secretary 4; Ellen Richards 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2; Pan American 

1, 2; Freshman-Junior Jamboree 1, Soph Luncheon 2; Junior Wel- 
come 3; Baccalaureate 3; Executive Board 1. 

AUDREY WINCHESTER BERRY 

Science. 68 Green St., Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. Ellen Richards 

2, 3, 4; M/V 3; NSA Secretary 3, 4, Poster Committee 1, 2, 3. 




BARBARA PRISCILLA BERTHELSEN 
Library Science. 3 Sherman St., Wollaston, 
Mic 4; 020 2, 3, 4. 



Mass. Glee Club 1; 



LORELEI ANNETTE BIRD 

English. Transferred U. of Wisconsin 2. 36 Emerson Road, Welles- 
ley Hills, Mass. Dramatic Club 3, President 4; English Club 4; 
Simmons Review 4; Compctitives 3, Director 4; Spring Produc- 
tion 3, 4. 



DIKKEN RODE BJERKE 

Home Economics. Transfer 2. Jegerveien 8 B.. 

Norway. Home Economics Club 3, President 4. 



Slemdal, Oslo, 



JANE ELIZABETH BLACK 

Prince. 90 North St., Saco, Maine. Outing Club 1; Prince Club 
2, 3, 4; Student Government Vice-President 4; YWCA 1; Ring 
Committee 2; Junior Welcome 3; Daisy Chain 3; Baccalaureate 
2, 3; Cotton Ball 2; Commencement 2, 3; President's Reception 
2, 3; Dorm Council, House Chairman 2, Chairman 4; Dorm 
Board Chairman 4; Honor Board 1, 3, 4. 




100 




KATHARINE ANN BLETZER 

Science. Transferred Lasell Junior College 2. 26 Glen Rd., Brook- 
line, Mass. Glee Club 2, 3; Newman 2; Dorm Council, House 
Chairman 4; Dorm Board Secretary 4. 

ESTHER MARIE BLOOM 

Business. 8 Upham Road, Lynn, Mass. Outing Club 1; Scribunal 

4; Daisy Chain 3. 



JANE AUGUSTA BOND 

English. 1059 Webster St., Needham, Mass. Anne Strong 2; 
English Club 3, 4; News 1, 2, 3; Outing Club 2, 3, 4; Simmons 
Review 4; Student Government Class Representative 2, 3, Honor 
Board Chairman 4; County Fair 3; Christmas Formal 2, 3; Soph 
Shuffle 2; Junior Welcome 3; Commencement 2; President's Re- 
ception 3; Mic Dance 1; News Dance 2; Dorm Council, House 
Chairman 4 ex officio; Dorm Board 4 ex officio; Fund Follies 
Chairman 3. 



FRANCES BONJORNO 
Prince. 140 Park St., Beverly, 
3, 4; Prince Club. 



Mass. Glee Club 1; Newman 1, 2, 




WILHEMINA TALBOT BOWEN 

Prince. 420 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Mass. Le Cercle Fran- 

cais 1; Outing Club 1, 2; Prince Club 2, 3, 4; May Breakfast 2. 

ANNE BOXER 

Preprofessional. 929a Blue Hill Ave., Dorchester, Mass. Acade- 
my 4; Hillel 1, 2; Le Cercle Francais 1 ; IZFA 3, 4. 







NANCY BRADLEY 

Home Economics. Harbor St., Branford, Conn. Home Economics 
Club; Student Government 1, 2; YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Wel- 
come 3; Daisy Chain 3; Olde English Dinner 4; Class Secretary 3, 
1st term 4; Fund Follies 3- 

FLORA C. BRATKO 

Business. 42 Smith St., Allston, Mass. Orthodox 2, 3, 4; Outing 

Club 1; Pan American 1; Scribunal 4; Junior Prom 3; Daisy Chain 

3. 



101 





LAURA BRATKO 

Business. 42 Smith St., AUston, Mass. Glee Club 1; Orthodox 

2, 3, 4 ; Outing Club 1 ; PCA 3 ; Junior Prom 3. 

MARY JANE BRENNER 

Prince. 1542 Dauphin Ave., Wyomissing, Penn. Glee Club 1; Pan 
American 1; Prince Club 1, 2; Daisy Chain 3; Hobo Party 4; 
President's Reception 3. 



REBECCA BOYNTON BROWN 

Home Economics. North Berwick, Maine. Home Economics 

Club 2, 3, 4; Daisy Chain 3. 

ELIZABETH C. BURGESS 

English. 151 Wendell Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. Mtc 4; NSA 3, 4; 
News 2, 3; Simmons Review 4; YWCA 4; Bib Party 3; Fire 
Warden 3, 4. 




ELIZABETH BURNS 

Prince. 23 T. Shore Rd., Ipswich, 

Prince Club 2, 3, 4; YWCA 1. 



Mass. Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; 



INA LORRAINE BUTTERFIELD 

Home Economics. 29 Washington St., No. Chelmsford, Mass. 

Anne Strong 1 ; Home Economics Club 3,4; Outmg Club 1, 2, 3. 







MARY JANE BUXTON 

Business. 11 Mohegan Rd., Larchmont, New York. Glee Club 
1, 2, 3; Scribunal 2; Student Government Assistant Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Junior Prom 3; Junior Welcome 3; Daisy Chain 3; Olde 
English Dinner 3; Honor Board Junior Representative 3; Presi- 
dent's Reception 3; Class Treasurer 1, 2; Fund Follies 3; Bluettes 
3, 4; Chairman Red Cross Drive 2. 

PATRICIA CANFIELD 

Prince. Transferred Cornell College, Mt. Vernon, Iowa 2; Babson 
Park, Mass. Glee Club 2, 3; Prince Club 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom 3; 
Daisy Chain 3; Commencement 3; Hobo Party 3; Transfer Com- 
mittee Co-Chairman 3; President's Reception 3. 



102 



ELEANOR LYSTEN CAREY 

Prcprofessional. 113 No. State St., Concord, New Hampshire. 
Le Cercle Francais 1; Newman 1, 2, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 4; Daisy 
Chain 3; Olde English Dinner 3. 

BARBARA JEAN CARNEY 

Prcprofessional. 58 Lincoln PI., Wellcsley Hills, Mass. Dra- 
matic Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 1, 2; Outing Club 1; PCA 1; 
Student Government Freshman Representative 1; Freshman 
Formal 1; County Fair 2; Competitives 2, 3, 4- 





MARGARET CLAIRE CAROLAN 

Home Economics. 53 Warren Ave., Chelsea, Mass. Home Eco- 
nomics Club 2, 3, 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Bib Party 3. 

ELAINE CAULFIELD 

Prince. 200 Manthorne Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. Newman 1, 2; 
Representative to Executive Board 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3; 
Prince Club 2, 3, 4; Commencement 3; Assembly Committee 
Sophomore Representative 2. 




LAILA CHARTUNI 

Science. 146 Kittredge St., Roslindale, Mass. Ellen Richards 

2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 2, 3; Mic4; Cap and Gown Committee 4. 

/OyC£ CHIN 

Prcprofessional. 3 Water Lane, Montego Bay, Jamaica, B.W.I. 

Pan American; YWCA. 



NANCY ANNE CHRISTOF PERSON 

Prince. 301 School St., Acton, Mass. Newman 1, 2; Outing Club 
1; Prince Club 2, 3, 4; YWCA 1; Soph Luncheon 2; Junior Wel- 
come 3; Daisy Chain 3; Baccalaureate, President's Reception 3; 
Dorm Council, House Chairman 1; Song Leader 2, 3. 

ELIZABETH JANE CHURCH 

Business. 2688 Cranlyn Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio. Glee Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Mic 3, Art Editor 4; Poster Committee 1, 2, 3; Scribunal 
Secretary 2, 3, 4; County Fair 3; Soph Luncheon 2; Ring Com- 
mittee 1; Junior Welcome 3; Daisy Chain 3; Olde English Dinner 
3; Baccalaureate, Commencement 3; Hobo Party 4; President's 
Reception 3; Mic Dance 4; Assembly Committee 3; Class Execu- 
tive Board 1, 2, Class Treasurer 3, 4. 





103 



BARBARA A. CLARK 

Library Science. 38 Hollander St., Roxbury 19, Mass. Academy 
4, NSA 3; 020 2, 4; PCA 3; Valentine Party 2; Junior Welcome 3; 
Daisy Chain 3; Library Executive Board 2, 4; WSSF 3, 4, All- 
College Fund Drive 3, 4. 

PHYLLIS CLARK 

Prince. 9TrescottSt., Taunton, Mass. 






GERALDINE ANNE CLIFFORD 

Science. 205 No. Franklin St., Holbrook, Mass. Academy 3, 4; 

Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4. 

SHIRLEY COAKLEY 

Business. 122 Lynn St., Peabody, Mass. Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Scribunal 2, 3, 4, Bib Party 3. 





MiNN^ THERESE COFMAN 

Home Economics. 121 Summer St., Fitchburg, Mass. HiUel 1, 2, 
3, 4; Home Economics Club 2, 3, Treasurer 4; Outing Club 1; 
County Fair 3; May Breakfast 2; Daisy Chain 3; Baccalaureate 
3; Olde English Dinner 4; Commencement 3; Transfer Committee 
4; President's Reception 4; Dorm Council, House Chairman 3; 
Dorm Board 3. 



SYLVIA ANN COHEN 

English. 101 Foxcroft Rd., West Hartford, Conn. English Club 
], 2, 3, Treasurer 4; HiUel 1, 2, Mic 3, 4; News 2, 3, 4, Outing 
Club 1; Pan American 1; Simmons Review 4; Soph Luncheon 2; 
Junior Welcome 3; News Dance 3; Competitives 2. 



NANCY COLBURN 

Home Economics. 114 Grandview Ave., WoUaston, Mass. Glee 
Club 1; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; YWCA 3, 4; House Fire 
Captain 3, Assistant Fire Chief 3. 

M^RG^K£T M^Ry COLLINS 
Nursing. 483 Prospect Ave., Revere. 




104 




NANCY K. CONLIN 

Science. 156 Babcock St., Brookline, Mass. Anne Strong 3, 
Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pan American 1,2, 3; 
YWCA 2, 3; May Breakfast 3; Olde English Dinner 4. 

ELAINE CRAIG 

English. 365 Main St., Saco, Maine. News 1; Poster Committee 
1 ; Simmons Review 4; Orchestra 1 ; Soph Shuffle 2; Dorm Council, 
House Chairman 3, 4; Dorm Board 3- 



RUTH CRIMMINS 

Science. 303 Morton St., Stoughton, Mass. Ellen Richards 1, 2, 

3, 4; Newman 1, 2; Outing Club 1; YWCA 1, 3. 

JEAN CUTLER 

Prince. Transferred Michigan State College 3. 2150 Robinson Rd., 

East Grand Rapids, Mich. Prince Club 3, 4. 




CONSTANCE E. DAVIS 

Business. 104 West River St., Milford, Conn. Academy 3, 4; 
Glee Club 1; Student Government Assistant Treasurer 3; Honor 
Board 4; Chairman Soph Luncheon 2; Ring Standardization 
Committee 2; Junior Prom 3; Junior Welcome 3: Soph Chairman 
Red Feather Drive 2; House Senior 4. 



ANN DELVANNO 

English. Raymond Rd., So. Sudbury, Mass. Academy 3, 4 
English Club 3, 4; Simmons Review 4; Le Cercle Francais 1 
News 1, 2, 3, 4; Pan American 1; PCA 3; Junior Welcome 3 
Daisy Chain 3; Commencement 4; President's Reception 4 
News Dance 3. 







ELS A DELVECCHIO 

English. 92 Bowdoin St., Medford 55, Mass. Academy 3, 4; 
English Club 3, 4; Mic 3, .Assistant Literary Editor 4; NSA 3; 
Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Simmons Review 4; Commencement 3; Mic 
Dance 4. 



THERESA DEPIPPO 

Home Economics. 205 Chestnut St. 

Economics Club 3, 4. 



Lawrence, Mass. Home 



105 




MARGARET DEVENEY 

Business. 56 Cerdan Ave., W. Roxbury, 

Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Scribunal 4. 



Mass. Glee Club 1; 



BLANCHE MAY DODGE 

Science. 27 Arbor St., Wenham, Mass. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; 

Daisy Chain 3; Olde English Dinner 3; Fund Follies 3. 



DEBORAH DODGE . 

Business. Church St., Alton, N. H. Outing Club 1, 4; Pan Ameri- 
can 1; Scribunal 2, 3, 4; Treasurer Student Government 4; Soph 
Luncheon 2; Valentine Partv; Co-Chairman May Breakfast 2; 
Chairman Junior Prom 3; Bib Party 3; Daisy Chain 3; Olde 
English Dinner 3; Baccalaureate 3; Commencement 2, 3; Transfer 
Committee; President's Reception 3. 

POLLY ANN DONOVAN 

English. 12 Simmons Ave., Belmont, Mass. Newman 1; Sim- 
mons Review 4; County Fair 3; May Breakfast 2; Junior Welcome 
3; Daisy Chain 3; Executive Board Representative 1, 2, 3. 




KATHRYN COTTINGHAM DRAKE {MRS. WILLIAM W.) 
Prince. Canal Road, Bound Brook, N. J. Outing Club 1; Prince 
Club 2, 3, 4; YWCA 1; Junior Prom 3. 

ELIZABETH S. DRURY 

English. 11 Holyrood Ave., Lowell, Mass. English Club 4; 
Home Economics Club 2; Newman 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1; Poster 
Committee 2, 3; Simmons Review 4; Soph Luncheon 2. 






JEAN ERICKSON 

Business. 2129 Gerard Ave. S., Minneapolis, Minn. Glee Club 1; 
Mic 3, Circulation Manager 4; Scribunal 3, 4; Soph Luncheon 2; 
Fire Warden 4. 

MILDRED F. FELDMAN 

Preprofessional. 19 Browning Ave., Dorchester, Mass. Hillel 

1, 2, 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 4; IZFA 1, 2, 3, 4; Outmg Club 3. 



106 



MURIEL EILEEN FERRIS 

English. 5 Madison Ave., Newtonville, Mass. English Club 
2, 3, 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4, Tea Chairman 3; Simmons Review 4, 
junior Welcome 3; DaisvChain 3; Commencement 3; Mic Dance 

4. 

JEAN FRANKEL 

Retailing. 12 Parkman St., Brookline, Mass. Dramatic Club 1; 
Hillel 1, 2, 3; Prince Club 1, 3, 4; Junior Welcome 3; President's 
Reception 2. 






MURIEL P. FRANZ 

Business. 346 Cornell St., Roslindale, Mass. Mic Business Man- 
ager 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2; Scribunal 2, 3, 4, 
Program Committee 3; Daisy Chain 3; Commencement 3; Mic 
Dance 4. 

RACHEL GALLUP 

Library. 61 W. Hanover Ave., Morris Plains, N. J. IVCF 1, 3, 
Secretary-Treasurer 4. 




CONSTANCE LEE GARVEY 
Library. 50 Roslvn St., Salem, 
020 4. ' 



Mass. Academy 3, 4; News 2, 3; 



ELAINE HOPE GAVIN 

Business. 98 Babson St., Mattapan, Mass. Christian Science 1, 2, 

3, 4, Secretary 2, Chairman Soph Shuffle 2, Commencement 3- 



SHIRLEY FAITH GAVIN 

Business. 98 Babson St., Mattapan, Mass. Christian Science 
1, 2, 3, President 4; Scribunal 4; Soph Luncheon 1\ Stu-G Class 
Representative 1, 2. 

ALEXANDRA GINSBERG 

Preprofessional . 939 Broadwav, Chelsea, Mass. Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; 

IZFA3,4;PCA3, 4. 





■V 



'*'l$>- ■ 



107 



MARY ANN GIORI 

English. 79 Central Ave., Hyde Pa."-!:, Mass. Outing Club 1, 2; 

Pan American 1, 2. 

NORMA BERNICE GOLD 

Science. 2021 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. Ellen 
Richards 2, 3, 4; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; Lounge and Butt Room Assis- 
tant 3, 4. 





>!*? 





EDYTHE GORDON 

Home Economics. 18 Morse PI., Leominster, Mass. Hillel 1, 2, 
3, 4; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1. 2, 3; PCA 
3, 4; YWCA 1; Fire Warden 4. 

NANCY LEE GOWER 

Library. 155 Oakleigh Rd., Newton, Mass. Glee Club 1 ; 020 4. 




GRETCHEN GRIFFITH 

Retailing. Transferred Stephens College, Columbia, Mo. 



Port Nelson, Ontario, Canada 
Club 3, 4. 



Academv 4; Glee Club 3; Prince 



ISABEL GUDAS 

Retailing. 1753 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Mass. Dra- 
matic Club 1; Newman 1, 2, 3, A; Pan American 1, 2, 3; Prince 
Club 2, 3, 4; Soph Shuffle 2; Bib Party 3, Commencement 3. 



GERTRUDE J. HACKETT 

English. 119 Walnut Hill Rd., Chestnut Hill, Mass. English 
Club 3; Mic 3, Newman 1, 2, 3; Pan American 2, 3; Simmons 
Review 4. 

BARBARA KENWORTHY HANSON 

Library. 353 El Camino Real, Vallejo, Calif. 020 4; Pan American 

1;YWCA1. 





108 




MARY HARSCH 

Business. Transferred University of Tennessee 2. 65 Hammond 
Rd., Belmont, Mass. Outing Club 2, 3, 4, President 2;Scribunal 
2, 3, 4i YWCA2, 4. 

SHIRLEY IRENE HAWKES 

Science. 290 Main St., Saugus, Mass. Academy 3, President 4; 

Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, Junior Prom 3- 



MARY HELLER 

Preprofessional. 42 E. 74th St., New York, N. Y. English Club 

1, 2, President 3, Secretary 4; Glee Club 1; Mic 3; County Fair 3. 

PHYLLIS HELLMAN 

English. 63 Lawton St., Brookline, Mass. Dramatic Club 1; 

Hillcl 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 4, Outing Club 1; Simmons Review 4. 




LOIS ANN HERMANN 

Retailing. 28 Summit Rd., Hamden 14, Conn. Poster Committee 
], 2, 3, 4, Chairman 2; Prince Club 2, 3, 4; YWCA 3; Freshman 
Formal 1, Freshman-Junior Jamboree 2; Soph Luncheon 2: Dorm 
Council, House Chairman 1. 

NANCY HOAGLAND 

Business. Transferred Monticello College 2. 25 Frederick St., 
Newtonville, Mass. Glee Club 2, 4, Pan American 2; Scribunal 
3; Daisy Chain 3; Hobo Party Decorations 4i Fund Follies 3. 







ANNE DEJONG HOLT 

Retailing. 410 Memorial Dr., Cambridge, Mass. Anne Strong 1; 

Outing Club 1 ; Prince Club 3, 4. 

(ELIZABETH') CAROL HUNT 

Retailing. 14 Huntington Place, New Hartford, N. Y. Dramatic 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman 1, 2; Prince Club 2, 3, 4; County Fair 3; 
May Breakfast 3; Junior Welcome 3; Olde English Dinner 3; 
Competitives 1; Assembly Committee 2; Executive Board 2. 



109 





PATRICIA ANN HURLEY 

Science. Owenoke Pk., Westport, Conn. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; 

Outing Club 1; YWCA 1. 

ALICE E. HUSSEY 

Preprofessional. Modern Dance 2; NSA 3. 



BARBARA F. HUTCHINSON 

Preprofessional. 56 Lexington St., East Lynn, Mass. English 

Club 4; Le Cercle Francais 4; PCA 3, 4, Olde English Dinner 4. 

NANCY HYDE 

Business. 124 Main St., Yarmouth, Maine. Glee Club 1, 2, 3; 
Outing Club 1: Scribunal 2, 3, 4; May Breakfast 2; Daisy Chain 3; 
Baccalaureate 2, 3; Commencement 2, 3; Dorm Council, House 
Chairman 3, Secretary Dorm Board 3; Executive Board 1; Fund 
Follies 3. 




ELINOR HYLEN 

Home Economics. 24 Maple St., West Roxbury, Mass. Home 
Economics Club 2, 3, 4; IVCF 4; Mic 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3; 
Bib Party 3; Daisy Chain 3; Commencement 3; President's Re- 
ception 3 

BARBARA JAFFEE 

English. Madeley, Somerstown Rd., Ossining, N. Y. Glee Club 
1, Outing Club 1, 2, 3; Poster Committee 2; Simmons Review 4; 
Soph Luncheon 2. 





«*<^ 






NANCY K. JENKINS 

Preprofessional. Transferred Westbrook Junior College 3. 8 

St., Portland, Maine. Dramatic Club 3; PCA 3; YWCA 4. 



1 State 



VIRGINIA JOHNSON JOHNS QMrs. Thomas R.Johns It) 
Home Economics. Transferred West Virginia University 3- 725 
White Ave., Morgantown, W. Va. Home Economics Club 3; 
YWCA 3. 



110 



MARJORIE ALICE JOLLES 

English. Transferred Syracuse University 2. 100 Hawthorne 
Rd., Braintree, Mass. M/c 3, Technical Editor 4; Simmons Review 
4; Bib Party 3; Daisy Chain 3; Chairman M/c Dance 4. 

CAROLYN JONES 

Science. Storrs, Conn. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 3, 4; 
Outing Club 1; YWCA 1; Daisy Chain 3; Olde English Dinner 4, 
Fund Follies 4. 





/M 






DOROTHY MAY JONES 

English. 84 Ralston Ave., Hamden, Conn. Mic Photography 
Editor 4; Simmons Review 4; Freshman-Junior Jamboree 3; May 
Breakfast 2; Junior Prom 3; Bib Partv 3; Chairman Daisy Chain 
3; Olde English Dinner 3; Transfer Committee 4; Mk Dance 4; 
English Representative to Executive Board 4. 

MADELEINE M. JOULLIE 

Science. 16 Leite Leal, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Ellen Richards 1. 





ELYN KAHN 

Preprofessional. 1125 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. Hillel 1; 

Le Cercle Francais 1 ; Mic 1 ; Treasurer NSA 4. 



BARBARA LOUISE KELLY 

English. 78 Chester Rd., Belmont, Mass. English Club 3, 4; 020 
1, 2; Pan American 1; Simmons Review 4; YWCA 1, 3- 



ELIZABETH ROOT KLEIN 

Retailing. 51 West North St., Stamford, Conn. Pan American 
1, 2; Prince Club 2, 3, 4; YWCA 1; Freshman-Junior Jamboree 3; 
County Fair 3, May Breakfast 2; Junior Prom 3; Transfer Com- 
mittee 4; Dorm Council, House Chairman 3, House Senior 4; 
Executive Board 3, 4. 

DORIS J. KLOP 

Retailing. Transferred Lawrence College, Appleton, Wisconsin, 

3. 1222 Stamford Ave., Kalamazoo, Mich. Prince Club 3, 4. 




Ill 



BARBARA ALICE KRIDEL 
English, nil Park Ave., New York, 
Hillel 1; Simmons Review 4. 



N. Y. English Club 4; 



HELEN VERNON KRUTE (Mrs. Aaron Kride) 
English. 67 Greenbrier St., Dorchester, Mass. Academv 3, 4, 
English Club 2, 3, 4; Hillel 2, 3, 4^ IZFA 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; 
Associate Editor Mic 4; Simmons Review 4. 





HARRIET LEE LABOVITZ 

English. Transferred Ohio State University 2. 55 Thomas Rd., 
Swampscott, Mass. Hillel 2, 3; Editor Hillel News 4; IZFA 2, 
Political Action Chairman 3, 4; Mk 3, Publicity Director 4; 
NSA 3, 4j News 4; Simmons Review 4; PCA 3, Secretary 4; Mic 
Dance 4, Le Cercle Francais 4. 

PHYLLIS DOROTHEA LAMERE 

Home Economics. 43 Robertson St., Quincy, Mass. Home Eco- 
nomics Club 2, 3, 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, President 4; Outing Club 1; 
Bib Party 3; Daisy Chain 3; Commencement 3; Dorm Council, 
House Chairman 3. 




EDNA MAY LANDERS 

Home Economics. 68 Niagara St., North Tonawanda, N. Y. 
Home Economics Club 2,3,4: Outing Club 1,2; YWCA 1,2,3,4; 
Olde English Dinner. 

BARBARA ANN LEBLANC 

Business. 177 Jackson Rd., Newton 58, Mass. Home Economics 
Club 2; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1; Scribunal Treasurer 3, 
President 4; Bib Party 3; Junior Welcome 3; Daisy Chain 3; 
Commencement 3- 



JOAN JOSEPHINE LEWIS 

Science. 19 Fremont St., Taunton, Mass. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; 

YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4. 

KATHERINE HYPATIA LIACOS 

Business. Sparrow Lane, Peabodv, Mass. Scribunal 3, 4, PCA 3, 

4, Secretary 3; USSAl. 




112 




MARJORIE LINCOLN 

English. 72 Grozier Rd., Cambridge, Mass. Academy 3; Senior 
Representative to the Executive Board 4; Lc Cercle Francais 1, 2, 
3, 4, Secretary 2, Representative to the Cercle Francais Inter- 
universitaire 2; Pan American 1; Simmons Review 4; PCA 3, 
Vice-Chairman 4; Valentine Party 2; Bib Party 3- 

DIXIE B. IJNDGREN 

Preprofessional. Transferred Sophie B. Newcomb Memorial Col- 
lege, 231 Park Drive, Boston, Mass. New Orleans, La. 3. 



DORIS MUNROH LINNELL 

Business. 29 Cranch St., Quincy, Mass. Christian Science 1, 
Reader 2, President 3, 4; Scribunal 2, 3, 4; Student Government 
Class Representative 4; Soph Luncheon 2; Ring Committee 2; 
Co-Chairman May Breakfast 2; Junior Welcome 3; Daisy Chain, 
Baccalaureate, Commencement 3; Presidents Reception 3, 
Executive Board 3. 



THORA BERTHA LINSKY 

Preprofessional. Transferred Calvin Coolidge College 3. 46 Wil- 
liams St., Brookline, Mass. Hillel 3, 4; IZFA 3, 4, News 3, Daisy 
Chain 3. 





BETTY LITTLE 

Business. 19 Crofton Rd., Waban, Mass. Pan American 1, 2; 
Scribunal 2, 3, 4; Chairman Freshman Formal 1; Class Repre- 
sentative Ring Committee 2; Junior Welcome 3; Baccalaureate 2; 
Executive Board 1 ; Social Activities Board 3. 

GLORIA S. LOMBARDI 

Home Economics. 217 WiUomae Dr., Syracuse, N. Y. Home 
Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2; 
County Fair 3; Soph Luncheon 2; Daisy Chain, Baccalaureate, 
Commencement 3; Executive Board 3, 4; Fund Follies 3- 





f: 




PHYLLIS ANN LOUIS 

Business. Transferred L^niversity of Maryland 3- 1 Burke Ave., 
Towson, Md. Business Manager News 4; Scribunal 3, 4; Fund 
Follies 3. 

MAGDELAINE PETER LOUVIS 

Prince. 35 Beechwood Rd., Summit, New Jersey. Glee Club 1, 2; 

Orthodox Club 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2. 



113 




VIRGINIA B. LOWE 

Nursing. 417 Brook St., Framingham Ctr., Mass. Anne Strong 2, 

3; YWCA 1. 

JEAN M. McCUEN 

Science. Transferred Women's College of the University of North 
Carolina. 137 Sewall Ave., Brookiine, Mass. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 
4, Bib Party 3. 



^NN T. MACDONELL 

Nursing. 59 Commonwealth Rd., Watertown, Mass. Anne 

Strong 2, 3; Newman 1,2,3- 

IRENE MacKENZIE 

English. 30 High St., Lawrence, Mass. Glee Club 2. 





MARJORIE R. MACOMBERQMrs. Leslie B.Smirh, Jr.') 
English. Transferred U. of California, Berkeley 2. Center St., 
Pembroke, Mass. Academy 4, Promotions Director Mic 4; Sim- 
mons Review 4; Mic Dance 4. 

JEAN MACRAE 

English. 152 Main St., Bridgewater, Mass. Dramatic Club 2; 
English Club 3; Glee Club 1, 2; News 3, 4; Soph Luncheon 2; 
News Dance 3; Competitives 2. 






CARMELLA JOANNE MACRI 

Science. 67 Quebec St., Portland, Maine. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4, 

Le Cercle Francais 1; Newman 1, 2; Outing Club 4. 

EMILY METCALF MACY 

English. 63 FLillcrest Rd., Needham, Mass. English Club 1, 2, 3, 
4, News 1, 2, Managing Editor 3, Editor 4; Outing Club 1, 
Pan American 1, 1; Simmons Review 4; Freshman Formal Publici- 
ty Chairman 1, Freshman-Junior Jamboree 1, Soph Shuffle Pub- 
licity Chairman 2;Junior Welcome 3, Daisy Chain, Baccalaureate, 
Commencement 3; President's Reception 3; Mic Dance 1; News 
Dance 2, Chairman 3; Competitives Publicity 3; Fund Follies 3. 



114 



ESTHER MALETZ 

English. 200 Norwell St., Dorchester, Mass. NSA 3, Chairman 4; 

News 1, 2, 3, 4, Associate Editor 3; Simmons Review 4. 



LOIS MANCHESTER 

Prince. 43 Spencer St., Winsted, Conn. Pan American 1; Prince 

Club 2, 3, 4; YWCA 1, 2, 3; Hobo Party. 






ELLEN MANNING 

Prince. 10 Glenn Rd., Belmont, Mass. Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Pan 
American 2, 3, 4; Prince Club 2, 3, 4; Student Government Chair- 
man of Social Activities 4; Soph Shuffle 2; Junior Welcome 3; 
Daisy Chain, Baccalaureate 3; Commencement 2, 3, President's 
Reception 2, 3; Class Secretary 1, 2; Class Vice-President 3. 

VIRGINIA MARCUS 

Preprofessional . 1163 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. Glee Club 
1, 2; Hille! Social Committee 1, Executive Board 2, Vice-Presi- 
dent 3, President 4; IZFA 4; PCA 3; Commencement 3; Presi- 
dent's Reception 2, 3. 



-liii^v 





MARGARET PATRICIA MARTIN 

Science. 235 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. Ellen Richards 

2, 3, 4, yWCA 4; Lounge and Butt Room Assistant 3. 

M^JRy R. MASSA 

English. 71 Leyden St., East Boston, Mass. English Club 3, 4; 

Le Cercle Francais 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2, Treasurer 4; NSA 

3, 4; Newman 1,2,3, 4; Simmons Review 4; Commencement 3. 



CONNIE MATTIOLI 

Preprofessional. 17 Woodland St., Plainville, Conn. Glee Club 
1; Le Cercle Francais 3; YWCA 3, Secretary 4; Freshman-Junior 
Jamboree 3; Soph Luncheon 2; Olde English Dinner CaroUer, 
Waitress Chairman 3; Fire Warden Assistant 3, Warden 4. 

DOROTHY M. MEDLICOTT 

Home Economics. 176 Fairview Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. Home 
Economics Club 2, 3, 4, Publicity Chairman 3; YWCA 1; Daisy 
Chain, Baccalaureate, Commencement 3; President's Reception 
3; Dorm Council, House Chairman 3; Fund Follies 3. 





115 



DORIS KAUSCH MESSER 

Science. Transfer, University of South Dakota. Watertown, 

S. Dakota. Ellen Richards 3, 4. 

DOROTHY MILLS 

Business. 75 Mt. Vernon East, Weymouth Heights, Mass. New- 
man 1, 2, Vice-Pres. 3, 4; Outing Club 1; Scribunal 3, 4. 





VIRGINIA A. MILLER 

Nursing. 24 Murray Hill Rd., Roslindals, Mass. Anne Strong 2 

3, 4, Outing Club 1,2, 3,4. 

ALICE MONDEAU 

Nursing. 118 No. Bedford St., East Bridgewater, Mass. Anne 

Strong 2, 3, 4; Newman 3; Outing Club 2. 





ETHEL WINIFRED MULHOLLAND 

Business. 1172 77th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. Newman 1, 4; Outing 
Club 1; Scribunal 4; Freshman-Junior Jamboree 1 j Soph Luncheon 
2; May Breakfast 2. 

BEVERLY LORRAINE NELSON 

Science. Russell Ave., Troy, N. H. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4, Outing 

Club 1. 



MARTHA JEANNE NELSON 

Prince. 8 Sherburne Rd., Lexington, Mass. Glee Club 1; News 2; 
Prince Club 2, 3, 4; Bib Party 3; Daisv Chain, Baccalaureate 3; 
Olde English Dinner Hostess 3; Dorm Council, House Chairman 
3, 4; Dorm Board 4. 

SUSAN KEITH NICHOLS 

English. Transferred American International College. Aruba, 



Netherlands West Indies. Dramatic 
Review 4; Competitives 2, 3, 4. 



Club 2, 3, 4; Simmons 




116 




FRANCES IRENE NOONAN 

Nursing. 44 Elliot Ave., North Quincy, Mass. Anne Strong 2, 3; 

Newman 1, 2, 3. 

MRS. ENA E. PHIPPS 

Science. Smyrna Mills, Me. Anne Strong 1, 2; Ellen Richards 4. 



ALICE ANN NUGENT 

Business. 137 Eastern Ave,, Gloucester, Mass. Dramatic Club 1; 
Glee Club 1, 2; Mic 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 
3; Pan American 1, 2, 3; Scribunal 3, 4; Soph Luncheon Waitress 
1; Daisy Chain, Baccalaureate, President's Reception 3; Mic 
Dance 3, 4; Dorm Council, House Chairman 1. 

E. MARILYN OBERLE 

Science. 58 Parklawn Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. Ellen Richards 
2, Secretary-Treasurer 3, President 4, YWCA 3, 4;. Junior Wel- 
come 3; Daisy Chain, Commencement 3 




JOYCE SELDA OBERMAN 

Science. Transfer, Woman's College of the University of North 
Carolina. 322 Westwood Rd., Woodmere, L. I., N. Y. Ellen 
Richards 3, 4; HiUel 3, 4; Mic 4, Outing Club 3, 4. 

JOYCE KATHRYN O'NEIL 

Home Economics. 100 Rotch St., New Bedford, Mass. Home 
Economics Club 3, 4; Newman 4; Student Government Honor 
Board 2, 3; Dorm Representative 4; Junior Prom 3; Bib Party 3; 
Junior Welcome 3; Olde English Dinner Chairman 4; Class Vice- 
President 1. 






JANE PATTERSON 

Prince. Transferred St. Mary's of Notre Dame, 3. 7034 Chappel 
Ave., Chicago, 111. Glee Club 3; Newman 4, Prince Club 3, Social 
Activities Chairman 4; May Breakfast 3; Daisy Chain 3; Hobo 
Party; Transfer Committee 4; President's Reception 3; Fund 
Follies 3. 



REBECCA PAULDING 

Library Science. Maple Hill Rd., Huntington, 

Transferred Cazenovia Junior College 3- 020 4. 



L. I., N. Y. 



117 




ELAINE B. PEKARSKI 

Science. 119 Bellcvue Ave., Brockton, Mass. Ellen Richards 4; 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1. 

ANNE PETERSON 

Science. 35 Durant Ave., Dedham, Mass. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; 
Newman 1, 3; Soph Shuffle Decorating Committee 2; May Break- 
fast 2; Junior Prom Chairman of Orchestra and Programs 3; 
junior Welcome 3; Baccalaureate, Commencement 3, President's 
Reception 3; Dorm Council, House Chairman 1; Dorm Board 1; 
Executive Board 2, 3, 4; Class Social Activities 3, 4 



FRANCES POGER 

Science. 112 Florence St., Everett, Mass. Ellen Richards 2, 4, 

Hillel 1, 3, 4; IZFA 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3; USSA 1. 

ELEANOR PORRITT 

Home Economics. GofFstown, N. Y. Glee Club 2; Home Eco- 
nomics 2, 3, 4; IVCF 4i Daisy Chain 3. 



ELSIE ELIZABETH PRATT 

Business. 133 Fifth St., Stamford, Conn. Modern Dance 1, Pan 
American 1, 2;Scribunai 3, 4; Freshman-Junior Jamboree 1; May 
Breakfast Chairman of Decorations 2, Waitress 3; Junior Prom 3; 
Bib Partv Co-Chairman 3, Olde F.nglish Dinner 3; Transfer Com- 
mittee Chairman 4; Dorm Council, House Chairman 4; Dorm 
Board 4; Mimeographing Committee Chairman 4; Executive 
Board Business School Representative 4. 

NINA PRISHVA 

Preprofessional. Transferred George Washington University 2. 

146 Bloomingdale St., Chelsea, Mass. Daisy Chain 3. 





ALICE LOUISE PURCELL 

English. 11 Lincoln PL, West Newton, Mass. English Club Tea 
Chairman 3, President 4; Mic 1; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 
3; Simmons Review 4; Junior Welcome 3; Daisy Chain, Com- 
mencement 3; Mic Dance Usher 4. 

DORIS ANNE RAUNIO 

Science. 50 Harris St., Quincy, Mass. Academy 3, 4; Ellen Rich- 
ards 2, 3, 4; Poster Committee 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, 3; Soph 
Luncheon Decorations and Placecards 2; May Breakfast Publicity 
Chairman 2; Bib Party 3; Baccalaureate, Commencement 2. 



118 



JEANNETTE H. REA 

Home Economics. 671 Chestnut St., North Andovcr, Mass. Glee 
Chib 2, 3, 4; Home Economics Club 3, 4; Poster Committee 1; 
County Fair Fashion Show 3; Junior Welcome 3; Commence- 
ment 3; President's Reception 2, 3. 

LORRAINE REDPATH 

Business. 85 Otis St., Milton, Mass. Glee Club J, 2, 4, Outing 
Club 1; Scribunal 3, 4; YWCA 1; Valentine Party 3; May Break- 
fast 2; Junior Welcome 3, Daisy Chain, Commencement 3; 
President's Reception 3- 







JULIANNA RICHARDS 

Nursing. 40 Murray Hill Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 

ELIZABETH RIEGEL 

Preprofessional. Transferred Converse College 2. 25 Helena Ave. 

Larchmont, N. Y. Glee Club 3, President 4. 




CHRISTINE AILEEN ROSS 

Home Economics. Harvard, Mass. Home Economics Club 3, 4; 

IVCF 1,2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2. 

JACQUELINE EVE ROTH 

Preprofessional. 37 Sedgwick Rd., West Hartford, Conn. Dra- 
matic Club 1; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Board 1; Mic 4; Outing 
Club 1, 4, Junior Welcome 3. 



CAROL ANN RUGGIERO 

Business. 280 Fountain St., New Haven, Conn. Dramatic Club 
2, Treasurer 3j Newman 1; Student Government Honor Board 4; 
Freshman Formal 1; Junior Welcome 3; Competitives 2; Dorm 
Council, House Chairman 3; Dorm Board Secretary 3; House 
Senior for Freshman Campus 4. 

PATRICIA IRENE RUSSO 

Preprofessional. 454 Ward St., Newton Centre, Mass. English 
Club 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; PCA 3, 4; Junior Welcome 3; Daisy 
Chain, Baccalaureate, Commencement 3; President's Reception 3. 





119 



HELEN KYAN 

Preprofessional. 274 Washington St., Belmont 78, Mass. Le 
Cercle Francais 3, President 4; Mic 3, Literary Editor 4; PCA 3, 4; 
Mic Dance 4. 

SATENIG M. SAHJIAN 

Home Economics. 97 Fuller St., Brookline 46, Mass. Glee Club 1; 
Home Economics 2, 3, Secretary 4; Student Government Honor 
Board 4; YWCA 3, Executive Board 4; Dorm Council, House 
Chairman 3. 





JEAN A. SCHMIDT 

Library Science. Transferred William Smith College, Geneva, 
N. Y. 3. 101 Buffalo Rd., East Aurora, N. Y. 020 3, Secretary 
4; Pan American 3; Daisy Chain 3, Competitivcs 3- 

WILLOUGHBY SCOTT 

English. Transferred Wheaton College. 3. 21 Beach Street, Co- 
hasset, Mass. English Club 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 4; Pan Ameri- 
can 3; Simmons Review 4. 



MARIAN SHANNON 

Business. 1614 No. Hudson, Los Angeles, Calif. Dramatic Club 

3, 4; Outine Club 1; County Fair 3; Curriculum Committee 2. 



MERILYN SHAW 

Business. 50 Fuller St., Dedham, Mass. 020 2; Outing Club 1, 4i 

Pan American 1; Scribunal 4; Fire Warden 3- 



NAOMI SIMCKES 

Preprofessional. 1242 Blue Hill Ave., Mattapan, Mass. Academy 
4; English Club 1, 4; HiUel 1, 2, 4; IZFA 2, President 3, 4; NSA 
4; PCA 3. 

DIANE SLONIM 

Library Science. Transferred College of Idaho 3- Wildcliffe, New 

Rochelle, N. Y. Hillel 3, 4, 020 President 4. 




120 





MRS. H. WILLIAM SNYDER, JR. {Marjorit A.) 

Prince. 729 Derstine Ave., Lansdale, Pa. Outing Club 1; Pan 

American 1 ; Prince Club 3, 4; YWCA 1. 

LOIS MARJORIE STEWART 

English. 175 Shelton Rd., Quincy, Mass. English Club 4; Outing 
Club 1 ; Simmons Review 4. 



MARION ISABEL STOCKING 

Home Economics. Glee Club 3, Treasurer 4; Home Economics 

Club 3, 4. 

LUCY ANN STOTT 

Library Science. Transferred Wooster College, Wooster, Ohio. 
3. 2930 Ellicott St., Washington, D. C. Glee Club 3; 020 4; 
County Fair Decorations 3. 





MARGERY ANNE STROUD 

Library Science. High St., Pembroke, Mass. 020 2, 3, 4; County 

Fair 3; Daisy Chain, Commencement 3; Executive Board 3. 

CLARE P. SULLIVAN 

Nursing. 73 Monarch St., Fall River, Mass. Anne Strong 1, 2; 

Newman 1, 2. 





X^^. 




PATRICIA ELIZABETH SULLIVAN 
Home Economics. 34 Lincoln St., Dedham, 
nomics Club 2, 3, 4; Newman 2, 3, 4. 



Mass. Home Eco- 



HELEN V. SUPRENANT 

English. 5 High St., Shelbourne Falls, Mass. Newman 1; Sim- 
mons Review 4; Student Government College Voucher 4; Junior 
Welcome 3i Assembly Committee 3, Chairman 4; Dorm Council, 
House Chairman 3- 



121 




KUTH E. TABER 

Nursing. P.O. Box 19, Mount Hermon, Mass. Anne Strong 2, 3, 

4;YWCA3. 

ELEANOR F. TAYLOR 

English. 4 Dean Way, South Boston, Mass. English Club 4; 

Lc Cercle Francais 4; Simmons Review 4; PCA 3; YWCA 4. 



ANN TEWKSBURY 

Business. 194 Longvue Dr., Wethersfield, Conn. Glee Club 1; 

Scribunal 4; Junior Welcome 3; Executive Board 1. 

RUTH FRENCH THOMPSON 

Home Economics. 142 North Rd., Bedford, Mass. Glee Club 1, 2, 
Concert Manager 3; Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4, Assistant 
Foods Chairman 3; YWCA 1; Junior Welcome 3; Olde English 
Dinner Page 3i Baccalaureate, Commencement 1, 2, 3; Dorm 
Council, House Chairman 1; Class President 4. 





KAMAOLIPUA IRMGARD THOMPSON 

Preprofessional. 3358 Kilauea Ave., Honolulu, T.H. NSA 3, 4; 

Executive Board Preprofessional School Representative 3, 4. 

PAULINE TROY 

Prince. 23 Kilsyth Rd., Brookline, Mass. Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Pan American 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3; Prince Club 2, 3, 4. 






GERTRUDE S. N. TSEU 

Preprofessional. Transferred Bowling Green University 3- 2916 



Oahu Ave. 
3. 



Honolulu, T.H. NSA 3; YWCA 4; Commencement 



ELEANOR MAY TUFTS 

Business. 198 High St., Exeter, N. H. Outing Club 1 ; Pan Ameri- 
can 1; Scribunal 2, 3, 4; Student Government 3, President 4; 
YWCA 2; Freshman-Junior Jamboree 3; May Breakfast 2; Bib 
Party Co-Chairman 3; Junior Welcome 3; Daisy Chain 3: Bac- 
calaureate, Commencement 2, 3; President's Reception 2, 3; 
Class President 1, 2. 



122 



NAYDA VALLDEJULY 

Business. 118 Raina St., Ponce, Puerto Rico. Outing Club 2; 
Pan American 1, 2, Tea Chairman 3, President 4; Scribunal 4; 
International Club 3. 



WIS H. VALPEY 

Science. 21 Chapin Rd., North Andover, Mass. Ellen Richards 

3, 4; Glee Club 2; May Breakfast 2. 






NANCY RUTH WALTER 

Business. 131 Mount Jay PI., New Rochelle, N. Y. Glee Club 
1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Scribunal 2, 3, 4; YWCA 1; Olde 
English Dinner 3; Transfer Committee 3; Fire Warden 1. 

JUSTINE WARNKE 

Science. 78 Bond St., Norwood, Mass. Dramatic Club 1; Ellen 

Richards 2, 3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 1; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4. 




ELIZABETH LOUISE WEBB 

Library Science. Edwards, St. Lawrence County, N. Y. IVCF 3; 

020 3, 4. 

^NN£ MARIE WEBSTER 

Science. Transferred Trinity College, Washington, D. C. 2. 167 
D St., Lowell, Mass. Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; Newman 4; Daisy 
Chain, Baccalaureate, Commencement 3; Transfer Committee 3. 



MARILYN ELIZABETH WELCH 

Business. 22 Alandale Ave., Brockton, Mass. Academy 3, 4; 

NSA 3, 4; Scribunal 3, 4: Assembly Committee 4. 

BARBARA COOPER WIEBENGA 

Science. 203 Park Dr., Boston, Mass. Academv 3. Treasurer 4, 

Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4. 





123 



MARILYN JANETTE WILCOX 

English. 16 Maple St., Arlington, Mass. Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
English Club 3, 4; Glee Club 1,2; Mic 2, 3, 4, Assistant Circula- 
tion Editor 3; News 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1; Simmons Review 4; 
YWCA 1; Soph ShufBe 2; Soph Luncheon 2; Junior Welcome 3; 
Commencement 2, 3; Hobo Party; Competitives Make-up Chair- 
man 1, Assistant Director 2, 3, Director 4. 

SHIRLEY WILLIAMS 

Busmcss. Transferred Duke University 3. 54 Frothingham St., 

Milton, Mass. Pan American 3, 4; Scribunal 3, 4, Tea Chairman 

3. 






T/ZRG7N//( WILSON 

Prince. 20 Commonwealth Rd., Watertown, Mass. 

RUTH WINTER 

Preprofessional. 17 Hilltop Ave., Barre, Vt. Anne Strong 2, 3; 

Outing Club 2; Pan American 2. 




LOIS A. WOLF 

Business. 30 Chesbrough Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. Newman 

1,2,3, 4; Scribunal 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom 3, Bib Party 3. 

BARBARA WOODBURY 

Nursing. 338 Western Ave., Lynn, Mass. Anne Strong 2, 3, 4. 

Chairman Capping Ceremony 3. 



JUANITA JEWELL WRIGHTS 

Business. Transferred Washington State College, Pullman, Wash- 
ington 3- 1121-2nd Ave., Fairbanks 8, Alaska. Glee Club 3, 4; 
Pan American 3; Scribunal 3, 4; May Breakfast 2; Daisy Chain 3; 
Olde English Dinner CaroUer 3, 4; Transfer Committee Chair- 
man of Dutch Treat Supper 3. 

PATRICIA YELLE 

Science. 532 Worcester St., Welleslcy Hills, Mass. Ellen Richards 
4; Glee Club 1, 2; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Scribunal 2; Freshman- 
Junior Jamboree 1; Junior Welcome 3; Daisy Chain, Baccalaure- 
ate, Commencement 3; Class Vice-President 4, Fund Follies 3; 
Cap and Gown Chairman 4. 





124 





\ -^F* 




LOUISA DAVIS COGSWELL 

Preprofessional. 67 Walker St., Cambridge, Mass. Le Cercle 
Francais 2, President 3; Outing Club 1; Bib Party 3; Daisy Chain 
3; Commencement 3. 

LILLIAN M. SMITH 

Nursing. 96 Nantasket Ave., North Cohasset, Mass. Anne 

Strong 1, 2, President 3. „ 

SHIRLEY ZINK 

Science. 427 Farmington Ave., Plainville, Conn. Ellen Richards 

2, 3, 4; Outing Club 2; Junior Prom 3. 



KATHERINE HALLIE ELKINS 

Preprofessional. 2029 Connecticut Ave., Washington, D. C. 

LORRAINE FERRIS 

Nursing. 90 Ruggles St., Quincy, Mass. Anne Strong 2, 3, 4; 
Outing Club 2; Pan American 2; Poster Committee 2, 3; Soph 
Luncheon 2. 

GRACE FITZGERALD 

Preprofessional. 809 East Fifth St., South Boston, Mass. Newman 

1,2; Outing Club 1. 

MARGARET HOLGATE 

Library. 130 Beresford Ave., Highland Park, Mich. Transferred 

Michigan State Normal College 2. 



AUDREY HAYES 

Nursing. 169 Cottage Park Road, Winthrop, Mass. Anne Strong 

1, 2, 3; Newman 2, 3. 

MIN I HUANG 

Home Economics. 6/168 Nan Chang Rd., Shanghai, China. 

Transferred St. Johns University, Shanghai, 4. 

MRS. ROBERTA RODES 

Preprofessional. 35 Gorham St., Cambridge, Mass. Transferred 

University of Southern California 4. 

LUCY EDWARDS WELLINGTON 

English. 257-27th Ave. North, St. Petersburg, Fla. Transferred 

Florida State University 3; English Club 3. 










125 




MICROCOSM BOARD 



Associate Editor 
Helen Vernon Krute 



Literary Editor 
Helen Ryan 

Assistant Literary Editor 
Elsa DelVecchio 

Advertising Manager 
Catherine Arlauskus 



EDITOR 
M. THERESE BENSON 



Technical Editor 
Marjorie Jolles 

Art Editor 
Jane Church 

Circidation Manager 
Jean Erickson 



Business Manager 
Muriel Franz 



Publicity Director 
Harriet Labovitz 

Promotions Director 
Marjorie Macomber 

Photography Editor 
Dorothy Jones 




126 




DANCING AUDITORIUMS^ 



BALLROOM 



DEPHAMt AlASSACHUSETTS - ON THE CHARLES 



Compliments of a Friend 



For Poultry . . . 

There's no place like Holmes 
SAMUEL HOLMES, INC. 

FANEUIL HALL 



LONGWOOD PHARMACY 

Boston's Most Modern Drugstore 

SERVING LUNCHES and SNACKS 

411 BROOKLINE AVENUE 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Nathan L. Ullian, Pharmacist and Chemist 



Established 


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w. 


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FANEUIL HALL MARKET 






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SIMMONS SEAL JEWELRY 

by BALFOUR 



BRACELETS 

KEYS and CHARMS 

COMPACTS 



RINGS 

BILLFOLDS 

STATIONERY 



Balfour Dance Programs are different and unique. 
Visit or Write 

L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

Room 202 - 230 Boylston Street - Boston, Mass. 



Switch to Durland's 



Canadian Health Bread. 



A distinctive, different, 

fine flavored bread. 

n^aked by 

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Be 


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ASpinwall 7-5000 



Compliments of 

Thomas Fish Market, Inc. 



1343 BEACON STREET 
BROOKLINE, MASS. 



BENTLEY & SIMON, Inc. 

7 West 36th St., New York 18, N. Y. 

Manufacturers of 

CHOIR GOWNS 

PULPIT ROBES 

CAPS, GOWNS, HOODS ^ 

for All Degrees 

Outfitters to over 3000 Schools, Colleges, and Churches 



HIGH CLEANSERS 

• Send us your most delicate garments. 

• Careful cleaning and pressing. 

• Alterations of all kinds. 

• Also Rugs Cleaned LAUNDRY 

259 BROOKLINE Ave., Boston 15, Mass. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



jf^VAL FOODS, Inc. 

38 HENRY ST. 
CAMBRIDGE, MASS, 



Wholesale Qrocers 



'To Our Many Friends 

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A special "THANK YOU" 
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to our quality dairy prod- 
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wishes for success! 

WHITING MILK 

Company 

[Quality for Over a Century) 



Solid Intensive Training. Individual 
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Restauranting All Chinese Delectable Delicacies 


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are smart, popular, 
and fashion proud . . . 

so it's only natural 
that when they sew, 

their fabrics 
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COSTUMES for the Amateur Stage, 

Plays, Operas, Carnivals, Pageants, 

Masquerades 



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Daily sight-seeing to all historical points. 
Deluxe buses for local and inter-state 
charter work. 

When in need for better service, call — 

The Gray & Rawding Lines 

Room 19 Copley Plaza Hotel 
Boston, Mass. 

Telephone KE 6-2470 



DIEGES and CLUST 

E.st. 1898 

Jewelers 

Designers and Makers of 

SIMMONS COLLEGE 
STANDARD RINGS 



BEATTIE 

AND 

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Incorporated 

FAMOUS FOR 

Silks Woolens 

Cottons Rayons 

Hosiery 



Underwear 



29 Temple Place, Boston 

Liberty 2-5753 



BARNABY, Inc. 

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LOngwood 1-5615 

11 HARVARD STREET 
BROOKLINE, MASS. 



Collupy & 

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: Fish Dea ers 






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140 Atlantic Avenue - - BOSTON 
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SfieoicUdyU 




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Symphony Hall 

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Wednesday, May 25th 



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We Carry a Full Line of 

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577 WASHINGTON ST. - BOSTON, MASS. 



ENGRAVING - PRINTING 
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HARPER W. POULSON 

Social and Commercial Stationer 



GREETING CARDS 



GIFTS 



Tel. KE 6-7268 547 BOYLSTON ST. 
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The 




Boston's Nicest Eating Place 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Club Luncheons - Class Meetings 

Dinner Parties 

3 Boylston Place, (near Colonial Theatre, Boston) 



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Once again . . . 



MICROCOSM reflects the life and 

spirit of the students at 

Simmons College 



Complete photographic service by 

SARGENT STUDIO 



154 BOYLSTON STREET 
BOSTON 



^ 



Photography * Design * Technical Assistance 




A Book To Be Treasured . . . 



This annual is a -pertnanent record, in picture and prose, 
of the academic year 1948-1949 at Simmons College. Its 
value will increase as the years pass, and the quality of the 
printing ivtll contribute in great measure to its lasting worth. 

The Andover Press, Ltd., takes pride in its well-known 
craftsmanship ivhich, combined with the long hours of careful 
planning and painstaking editorial tvork by the AIICRO- 
COSM Staff, makes this a book to be treasured. 



The ANDOVER PRESS, J(^d. 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



This fortieth volume of 

MICROCOSM 

celebrates the fortieth anniversary of a yearbook and relates a history 
of Simmons College through the fifty years since its founding. Edited 
by the undergraduates of Simmons, Mic '49 was privately printed by 
letterpress in a limited edition of 400 copies, the type being 
distributed after use. The body type is Garamont No. 248, set 
by monotype, and the display type is Garamont bold italic, set by 
hand. The paper is eighty-pound enamel of the best grade, 
and the cover material is fabricoid. Printing plates 
are photoengravings on zinc and copper. This 
book is bound in sixteen page signatures 
and the volume was completed, bound, 
and distributed on May 16, 1949, 
in Boston, Massachusetts. 




DATE DUE 



NOT fO^ ClRGULATIOIi